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Walmart's leadership can be characterized as a blend of both normative and path-goal theories. Normative theory focuses on leaders setting standards for behavior, which aligns with Walmart's emphasis on corporate values and ethics. Path-goal theory, on the other hand, emphasizes the leader's role in clarifying goals and removing obstacles for employees, which is evident in how Walmart's leadership provides guidance and support to its workforce.

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Q: Is Walmart's leadership a normative or path goal theory?
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How to develop and example where you operationalize path-goal theory?

To operationalize path-goal theory, you can identify specific leadership behaviors (directive, supportive, participative, achievement-oriented) and link them to motivational factors (employee satisfaction, performance, goal achievement). For example, in a workplace setting, you can track how different leadership styles influence employee motivation and goal attainment, demonstrating the theory in action.


How does servant leadership differ from path goal theory?

Servant leadership focuses on leaders serving the needs of their followers to help them grow and reach their potential. Path-goal theory, on the other hand, emphasizes how leaders can help followers achieve their goals by providing guidance, support, and removing obstacles in the path to success. While servant leadership is rooted in humbly serving others, path-goal theory is about facilitating achievement through effective leadership behaviors.


What is the definition of path-goal theory?

Path-goal theory is a leadership theory that suggests a leader's effectiveness is determined by how well they help their followers achieve their goals by clarifying the path forward, removing obstacles, and providing necessary support and rewards. It focuses on how leaders can motivate followers to reach their objectives by adapting their leadership style to the needs and characteristics of their team.


What is the path goal theory?

Path-goal theory is about fit between motivation, behavior, environment, tasks, and reward (Evans, 1970; House, 1971). It traces its origins to expectancy theory, situational leadership and contingency theory, and builds upon all three. Path-goal theory is therefore about flexibility.


What does the path goal leadership theory entail?

The manager articulates the objectives (the goal) to be accomplished and how these can and should be completed (the path) to earn rewards. This theory encourages managers to facilitate job performance


What are the advantages and limitations of the path goal approach to leadership?

The advantage of the path-goal theory is that managers can select from many different leadership theories that are available. The limitation of the theory is that they will be limited in their selection of theories due to the job requirements and existing organizational culture.


The path-goal theory situational leadership theory and The multiple linkage model are examples of what theory?

The theory that leaders are not born, but can be trained as leaders, and that a leader can change behaviors based on situational or follower characteristics or contingencies.


What are the weakness of the path goal theory?

Path-goal theory is about fit between motivation, behavior, environment, tasks, and reward (Evans, 1970; House, 1971). It traces its origins to expectancy theory, situational leadership and contingency theory, and builds upon all three. Path-goal theory is therefore about flexibility. From expectancy theory, path-goal finds that motivation works best by encouraging followers in their strengths and rewarding them for their efforts. The leader identifies the development level of the followers as well as the supportive and directive behavior criteria to be filled. In the situational leadership model this corresponds to delegating, supporting, coaching and directing behaviors. Where path-goal deviates from situational leadership is in the leaders need to be able to adapt to the characteristics of the followers and the task at hand. Additionally flexibility is needed not only on the behavior of the leadership in understanding the needs of the followers, but also to the environment the organization is operating as well has the internal workings of the organization itself. This ability to adapt to environment and internal operational parameters is the foundation of contingency theory. The objectives that path-goal theory follows to evaluate the surroundings and personalities are (a) define goals, (b) clarifies path, (c) remove obstacles and provide support. Based in the typology, path-goal theory offers, "…a large set of predictions for how a leader's style interacts with subordinates' needs and the nature of the task. Among other things, it predicts that directive leadership [directive] is effective with ambiguous tasks, that supportive [coaching] leadership is effective for repetitive tasks, that participative [supporting] leadership is effective when tasks are unclear and subordinates are autonomous, and that achievement-oriented [delegating] leadership is effective for challenging tasks." (Northouse, 2004, p. 144) Strength of path-goal typology is therefore based on the situational framework of understanding how achievement-oriented (delegating), participative (supporting), supportive (coaching) and directive (directive) behaviors affect the productivity and satisfaction of the followers. Additionally path-goal theory integrates the motivation principles of expectancy theory with the adaptation to environment and internal organizational parameters of contingency theory. Though flexible in nature, path-goal theory in itself is also complex and counter intuitive; herein lies its criticism. "Path-goal theory encompasses so many interrelated sets of assumptions that it is hard to use this theory in a given organizational setting"


What are the weaknesses of the path goal theory?

Path-goal theory is about fit between motivation, behavior, environment, tasks, and reward (Evans, 1970; House, 1971). It traces its origins to expectancy theory, situational leadership and contingency theory, and builds upon all three. Path-goal theory is therefore about flexibility. From expectancy theory, path-goal finds that motivation works best by encouraging followers in their strengths and rewarding them for their efforts. The leader identifies the development level of the followers as well as the supportive and directive behavior criteria to be filled. In the situational leadership model this corresponds to delegating, supporting, coaching and directing behaviors. Where path-goal deviates from situational leadership is in the leaders need to be able to adapt to the characteristics of the followers and the task at hand. Additionally flexibility is needed not only on the behavior of the leadership in understanding the needs of the followers, but also to the environment the organization is operating as well has the internal workings of the organization itself. This ability to adapt to environment and internal operational parameters is the foundation of contingency theory. The objectives that path-goal theory follows to evaluate the surroundings and personalities are (a) define goals, (b) clarifies path, (c) remove obstacles and provide support. Based in the typology, path-goal theory offers, "…a large set of predictions for how a leader's style interacts with subordinates' needs and the nature of the task. Among other things, it predicts that directive leadership [directive] is effective with ambiguous tasks, that supportive [coaching] leadership is effective for repetitive tasks, that participative [supporting] leadership is effective when tasks are unclear and subordinates are autonomous, and that achievement-oriented [delegating] leadership is effective for challenging tasks." (Northouse, 2004, p. 144) Strength of path-goal typology is therefore based on the situational framework of understanding how achievement-oriented (delegating), participative (supporting), supportive (coaching) and directive (directive) behaviors affect the productivity and satisfaction of the followers. Additionally path-goal theory integrates the motivation principles of expectancy theory with the adaptation to environment and internal organizational parameters of contingency theory. Though flexible in nature, path-goal theory in itself is also complex and counter intuitive; herein lies its criticism. "Path-goal theory encompasses so many interrelated sets of assumptions that it is hard to use this theory in a given organizational setting"


What does the path-goal leadership theory entail?

The path-goal leadership theory focuses on how leaders can help followers reach their goals by providing direction, support, and motivation. It emphasizes that leaders should adapt their style to the needs of their followers and the situation at hand to enhance performance and job satisfaction. The theory suggests that leaders can achieve this by clarifying goals, removing obstacles, and offering rewards.


What are the advantages and limitations of the path-goat approach to leadership?

The path-goal theory of management is based on the leader's ability to choose the appropriate style for the organization in order to reach certain goals. The path-goal theory is based on the idea that specific actions will result in a known outcome.


What leadership is most appropriate when the group's purpose is to reach a particular goal?

instrumental leadership