Chemistry

Is a crushed can chemical or physical?

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2009-03-31 22:12:16
2009-03-31 22:12:16

physical because its still a can and can go back to its original form

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Crushing chalk is physical not chemical.







A can being crushed is definitely a physical change. Same properties, just a different shape!


Physical, if it became an entirely new substance it would be chemical




Physical change, because the chemical structure is not changed by crushing.




It's still the same substance, so it is a physical change.


When a aluminum can is crushed, it undergoes a physical change, because even though the object got crushed and misshaped it still has the same identity.The identity has never changed.


Nope. That is a physical change. a sugar cube that is crushed into powdered sugar is still sugar.


Yes, a crushed can has chemical properties. They are the same as those of the can before crushing. Crushing a can is a physical reaction and not a chemical one. For instance, if a soup can is made of steel, the steel can be chemically attacked by something like sulfuric acid. And this is true whether the can is crushed or not.



When this can was crushed did it undergo chemical or a physical reaction


Well you can't put it back together after it's been crushed, so it's a chemical change!


Crushing the graham crackers is a physical change, not chemical. *Chemical reactions and chemical changes are the same thing.


The same as in the non-crushed can.


The act of burying garbage itself is not really a physical change. If the garbage was crushed, that would be a physical change. When the garbage decomposes in the ground, that is a chemical change.


A crushed can is shiny, malleable, and hard. == == It is crushed. It is a can. It is probably dirty, depending on HOW it was crushed.




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