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Is a fiberglass pool better than a gunite pool?

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2011-08-24 06:51:28
2011-08-24 06:51:28

Yes, fiberglass pools have a smooth finish. Where a concrete pool was a pourus and rougher finish that gives alge something to grab on to. Also staining it. A low calcium level can pit a concrete pool, not a fiberglass, plus a fiberglass pool is more flexible,so ground movement wont crack it. In the long run the extra money you pay for fiberglass is worth it.

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A fiberglass pool requires less maintenance, less repairs structurally in the future, is quick to install, and is good for smaller pools. Gunite pools are better for a pool deeper than 8 feet, custom shapes, and is a bit harder on the feet than a fiberglass pool.

u can NOT convert one into another.... ud have to rip it out and start over... either gunite or fiberglass

Both pools have many features Both fiberglass and gunite swimming pools can have almost all the same custom accessories and great equipment. You can design any size or shape gunite pool shell and customize the surface to almost any color quite easily. A fiberglass pool shell manufacturer is like a boat dealer with a catalog of models produced and custom sizes are generally not available. A fiberglass pool can be installed a bit faster than a gunite pool but the major investment you will make in either project usually never warrants a decision based on a few weeks time built sooner. Your gunite pool can have a built in hot tub or water feature , but your fiberglass pool can also. You have more options with coping on a gunite pool than fiberglass, but your fiberglass pool can still be made to look like a gunite pool if you like. A fiberglass pool shell can have a lifetime warranty for factory defects and most gunite builders also offer a similar warranty, I always say though when is the last time you saw a defective bag of concrete or tub of fiberglass resin? The surfaces of both pools can be as diverse as the pools themselves, you can go with white polyester gel coat on fiberglass or white marcite on gunite, your choice can be a custom quartz finish with a fiberglass pool or a custom quartz finish with a gunite shell also, with each pool shell having a respective warranty for finish from as little as one year to as many as 10 full years or more. Both finishes are very dependent on your skills as a pool-owner to manage them, all information you learned when you bought your pool from a licensed , insured swimming pool professional. Fiberglass pool shells rarely get deeper than 8 foot the minimum standard for a diving pool, while a custom shell with gunite can be built to exceed many standards. The old myths of falty fiberglass and gunite swimming pools have been propagated by dealers long since gone out of business. If your looking for a reliable and safe pool that keeps its value backed by strong dealer sales and service networks fiberglass and gunite are equally great choices and readily available. It's never been a better time to be in the circle of pool ownership. getapool.com good swimming

I am researching the same question and this is what I have found so far: having a "freeze line" is not a good condition for fiberglass pools. Fiberglass pools are cheaper to install and use less chemicals to maintain. I was told the chemicals also do less damage to fiberglass, if any?, than to gunite pools. Fiberglass pools must be filled at all times to avoid "popping up". The only thing that still has me leaning towards gunite is a custom pool shape we have in mind. Hope this helps. I am also trying to decide between fibergalss and gunite. I have been told (by a gunite dealer) that there is a problem with staining in fiberglass pools. Besides a low water level, what else might cause a fiberglass pool to pop up?

Gunite will generally last longer than fibreglass (if you take care of the plaster, and "cure" the gunite properly when it is installed). You can also make a Gunite pool any shape and size that you like, whereas you're limited to the few molds that a fibreglass manufacturer has. Personally, I like the feel of a plaster (gunite) pool on my feet *much* better than paint or fibreglass. The biggest advantage of concrete over fiberglass is the structure. 8in. of concrete and steel versus 3/4 to1in. of fiberglass. I'll take concrete and steel every time. 30 yrs. in the biz. tell me so.

Although the maintenance and cost of construction is higher than of fiberglass, it will hold up probably years longer than fiberglass. Especially if you will be having kids around- they can be tough on things, and fiberglass can get expensive if you end up with enough scratches, etc.

No, because fiberglass can make you slip unlike concrete steps

yes they are easier to install and last much longer!

This very subject has been debated for years. I can tell with full confidence, that gunite is much better than shotcrete. Both are good depending on the builder.. I can tell you with full confidence, having worked for more than thirty years with both gunite and shotcrete that shotcrete is far superior to gunite. Shotcrete will test out stronger, to much room for human error with gunite.

there is a product called "pebble tec" that is great. better than both products you mentioned. it is a little more expensive, but looks and lasts much better. other wise i would stay with plaster. from what i understand it adhears better to the gunite.

Yes, this can be done however, basically the only thing you can use from your vinyl pool is the actual 'hole' and maybe equipment. The cost is not much less than having a new gunite pool built.

Fiberglass insulation is better than air, but closed cell foam is better.

In my opinion, none! Stick with Marcite. I completely disagree. With 19 years experience in the restoration of older swimming pools, I have learned that fiberglass swimming pools are the best of the best. My business is limited to older pools, so my expertise is in swimming pool longevity, therefor my answer is: If you expect to own the pool for more than 15 years, and if you can afford a gunite, concrete, or fiberglass pool, you should definitely choose fiberglass. On the other hand, if price is the issue, you should choose a vinyl liner pool which will cost about half that of gunite, concrete, or fiberglass. Unfortunately, when you decide to sell, a vinyl liner pool will actually detract from the value of the home. On a geographical basis, Florida is a great place for a fiberglass swimming pool, but so are the rest of the Continental United States. Location does not matter, regardless of what you may read in these forums. The only thing that does matter is that you never empty the pool without professional assistance. The same rule applies to vinyl liner pools. The only advantage to gunite and concrete pools is that you can usually get away with emptying the pool without help. But even concrete and gunite pools can be seriously damaged if the pool is emptied without consideration for hydrostatic pressure. Just like construction of a gunite, concrete, or vinyl liner pool is quite important, so is the installation of a fiberglass pool. It is not a DIY project for most people. Another important factor with fiberglass is the manufacturer of the pool. I consider the very best to be San Juan pools because no San Juan pool owner has ever contacted our company for restoration before the pool was at least 27 years old. Finally, there is no such thing as a surface that will last a "lifetime", unless you consider a lifetime to be 20 years or less (excluding only San Juan). Frankly, I thought 20 years was a "generation", but the pool manufacturer's and builders seem to have the two terms confused. Fiberglass requires considerably less chemicals and far less maintenance that any other pool currently in existence.

The gunite pool is basically what most people refer to as the in-ground concrete pool. Because this pool will shape to the contours of your yard, it is a great choice for those who want something more unique than the typical vinyl lined pools. The tile on the gunite pool can be cleaned with household tile cleaner when you are doing your deep cleaning of your pool. This requires that the pool be drained and rinsed thoroughly.

Far superior to an above ground pool, the fiberglass pool is still not cheap. If you install it yourself, depending on the various options, you will spend $12,000-$30,000. Add another $8,000-$20,000 to have it and a concrete barrier installed by a company.

The width of the wall of the pool, about the first 42" down from the top, depends on the type of pool. Excluding pools older than 40 years, gunite and concrete pool walls are 12" thicik; fiberglass pool walls are 5/8" thick, and most vinyl liner pool walls are 1/8" thick and made of galvanized steel. A very small percentage of vinyl liner pool walls fiberglass and 3/8" thick, plus an even smaller percentage are cypress wood about 8" thick.

The cost of a fiberglass or concrete pool depends on what part of the country you live in. In much the United States, especially southern regions, a fiberglass pool can cost more than a concrete pool. In the Midwest market that we build in a fiberglass pool will typically cost 10% - 20% less than a quality built concrete pool that is built be a reputable company. For other swimming pool questions you can visit my blog at signaturepoolschicago.com/blog.

Yes it can, but it will be very costly. A great alternative (and much less expense option) would be to coat the pool with a new fiberglass surface. The new fiberglass shell will be extremely strong, will not tear like the vinyl liners, and will last many more years than the liners do. Fiberglass can be applied over plaster, aggregate (pebble-tec), vinyl liners, and virtually any other surface. You can see a video here:http://www.advancedpoolcoatings.com/videos.html

100-150 ppm of calcium in a fiberglass pool has been shown to reduce staining and spotting. Other than that, I know of no other benefit.

All day long. Concrete pools have real tile instead of the fake liner tile look. You can update a concrete pool later on as styles change: with vinyl it's final.

A gunite pool shell IS waterproof before plastering. First, gunite/shotcrete is not water proof. The reason for the plaster is to make the pool water proof. You don't have to and should not water proof gunite because it will affect the bonding properties for the plaster. Contrary to the previous answer, Gunite is in fact "waterProof" when correctly applied. Unless there are improperly prep'd cold-joints (the point at which one application has stopped for some reason -perhaps rain, slow truck turnaround, etc- and begun at a later time), a Gunite pool could virtually be "painted", providing a high steel-trowel finish was applied to the Gunite. But, Gunite pops (begins to set and cure) faster than typically appied Marblite or Diamond Bright type cementitious finishes. Actually, the Gunite "finish" surface is purposely left fairly rouch, providing a better surface to which the finish/color material may bond.

My mobile home park is going through this right now, so I will give you what I have learned. A word of caution, I am still trying to find an unbiased answer myself all of my pros/cons come from the fiberglass or plaster contractors so of course they believe their product is better. From our pool maintenance company (the one unbiased answer I have) They recommend using fiberglass on our Spa to reduce the chance of black algae, and plaster on the pool for the ease of maintenance. >>Pro's for plaster. Underwater epoxy repairs can be made without draining the pool. More resilient than the Gel-Coat of the fiberglass. More readily available contractors. >>Pro's for fiberglass. Resists Black Algae. Resists rust stains from behind. Lasts longer than plaster. ---Con's for plaster. If Black Algae starts its roots go through the pourous plaster and embed in the gunite, and will always return. Plaster doesn't bond well to old plaster. ---Con's for fiberglass. Fiberglass companies go out of business because their products fail in a few years. Fiberglass contractors are hard to find. The only way to repair fiberglass is to drain the pool and apply a new Gel-Coat over the entire surface. Fiberglass is not waterproof at all, only the Gel-Coat is. A Plaster contractor said... "I have heard that the fiberglass fails in like 5 years and then the company goes out of business." A Fiberglass contractor said... "I have heard of huge sections of the plaster falling off, because the old layer of plaster was not completely removed and when it came off it took the new plaster with it, in court the contractor's stance was that their coat held on fine and that it was not their fault since their work was still sticking to the old plaster." I wish a neurtral party like a university would do a study on this. -signed Just as lost in the sauce as the original poster.

You have slightly less maintainence with fiberglass than other types which might require periodic refinishing and acid washing. In addition it's slightly easier to maintain the balance in a fiberglass pool. So there seem to be no real special maintainence problems with fiberglass and less trouble than some other types.

Depending on the requirements or applications that the flagpole is better fiberglass may be better. In general, fiberglass flagpoles and any object made of fiberglass will generally be more weather resistant, weigh less, and have the potential to be stronger then metal objects, but at the same time, these fiberglass objects may cost much more than the same objects made of metal.


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