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2011-11-04 19:40:09
2011-11-04 19:40:09

If the "Code of Whites" refers to anything racial, then I can answer definitively that no, the code of whites is NOT enforced in the Mormon Church. The Church turned its back on all racial issues in 1970, and they have not looked back.

If the "Code of Whites" has something to do with the white clothing that Mormons wear under their street clothes or in the temple, then I have no idea, and this answer should be copied to the discussion page, so that this question will appear unanswered for further contributors.

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