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Answered 2011-02-11 00:38:07

No, the Milky Way is a galaxy. It's the one we live in.

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Our Milky Way has several hundred billion stars; most of the stars you see in the sky are part of our Milky Way. Just check for the brightest star in each constellation, or the brightest stars (in apparent magnitude), to get a few names.Our Milky Way has several hundred billion stars; most of the stars you see in the sky are part of our Milky Way. Just check for the brightest star in each constellation, or the brightest stars (in apparent magnitude), to get a few names.Our Milky Way has several hundred billion stars; most of the stars you see in the sky are part of our Milky Way. Just check for the brightest star in each constellation, or the brightest stars (in apparent magnitude), to get a few names.Our Milky Way has several hundred billion stars; most of the stars you see in the sky are part of our Milky Way. Just check for the brightest star in each constellation, or the brightest stars (in apparent magnitude), to get a few names.


Well, the Milky Way doesn't only include stars but it includes planets too.


The Milky Way is a galaxy made up of billions of stars of which our solar system is a part. A constellation is a grouping of stars in apparent proximity that form identifiable patterns. Both are made up of stars.


All stars that you can see (and thus constellations) are part of the Milky Way Galaxy.


No. A constellation is a collection of stars that form a recognizable shape. All the stars we see in the constellations are in our own galaxy, the Milky Way.


Yes, all the stars that make up the constellation Sagittarius are part of our galaxy, the Milky Way.


All stars and constellations that we can see are in the Milky Way galaxy.


galaxy well... the milky way itself is a constellation but we live in what we call the milky way galaxy.,


Yes. All of the individual stars that you can see are part of the Milky Way, which is our galaxy. So, every star that forms a constellation is also part of the Milky Way.


the milky way is the galaxy in which we stand. it has constellations in it but is not in a constellation


Obviously, the Milky Way is our Galaxy (or the huge band of stars with that same name) and Centaurus is only a constellation. To be fair to the questioner, Centaurus is in an area of the sky that does contain part of the band of stars called the Milky Way.


No. The Milky Way is the name for our galaxy. Orion is just a constellation.


The Milky Way is the plane of our galaxy NOT a constellation. We can see it because we are part of it.


Yes. All of the stars we can see with the naked eye are in the Milky Way galaxy.


Bad definition, but you probably mean the Milky Way bar.


The constellation norma is a L shaped constellation in the sky. It runs throught the milky way The constellation norma is a L shaped constellation in the sky. It runs throught the milky way


The Milky Way is out nearest Galaxy. It is not a constellation.


the difference is that the milky way is a big group of stars and much more and the big dipper is just a plain old constellation


About 100 billion in that it is nearly a twin of our Milky Way Galaxy.


All of the stars visible to the naked eye are members of the Milky Way Galaxy.


Yes because its a constellation. you can only see it at night because of the stars.


Yes. All constellations are in the Milky Way. Note that the Andromeda constellation is not to be confused with the Andromeda Galaxy.


All stars visible with the naked eye are in the same Galaxy. Our galaxy, the Milky Way.


Aries is a constellation, a perceived arrangement of stars in the night sky. The constellation Aries is merely a PATTERN; it isn't anything real. The stars that make up the pattern are all in the Milky Way galaxy.



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