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Is there sweat in milk?

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2007-05-10 17:33:16
2007-05-10 17:33:16

Although the primary constituent of milk -- that is, water -- is the same as the primary constituent of sweat, there is no sweat in milk.

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None of the aliens that I know sweat milk -- but the platypus and the spiny anteater do. This is the beginnings of the mammary glands - enriched sweat.


No. Pigs don't sweat at all.


No. The production of milk is not related to how sweat is created and excreted via sweat-glands. The udder is not even made up of sweat glands in the first place!


No animals "sweat milk". This question possibly arises from the misconception that platypuses (which are not even remotely related to otters) sweat milk. Neither platypuses, nor otters, nor any other mammal sweats milk. The mammary glands which supply milk are essentially just modified sweat glands in all mammals.


No, they definitely do not. Cross that out. Think about female humans, do we sweat milk? Cows make milk for their offspring, not just body fluids. To be honest... I do not think cows even sweat. :p Hope this helped.


Milk is an extreme minor amount of sweat since it is mostly water with only 0.2%-1.0% mineral, lactate or urea.


See what you do is you go out side run alot and then produce sweat. and in doing that you stipp off your cloths and dripp you ball sweat into the milk thus cause condesed milk.


Yes, it is very common that Hamsters sweat sometimes even in their urine ( PEE ) .


Yes and no. In monotremes, which includes the platypus, there are mammary glands but no teats. When producing the milk, the mother excretes milk out of pores in the skin and the young platypuses lick the milk off the abdomen. The mother has grooves specifically designed to keep milk that is excreted out. These glands from which the milk is secreted are modified sweat glands on the platypus's abdomen. In all mammals, the mammary glands are really little more than modified sweat glands, but it's the the absence of nipples which is more obvious in platypuses. Interestingly, the male platypus's venom gland is also a modified sweat gland.


Enough to fill a pint of milk.


Both of them are exocrine glands i.e. they have duct systems that accept the glands' secretions; milk and sweat.


toothpaste, milk, sweat, washing powder, dry cleaner


Platypus, they sweat milk and it's children lick it's fur, unlike most mammals that have nipples.


Neither the male nor the female really sweats milk. The female produces milk for her young, but all mammals' mammary glands are just modified sweat glands. The difference is that female platypuses exude milk from several glands over their abdomen and since they do not have teats, the young have to drink it from the grooves into which it collects.


Mammary glands are modified sweat glands and are the distinctive feature in mammals.


water, milk, sugar, mud, sweat, droppings


Because they don't have properly formed nipples, so the milk oozes straight through the skin in certain spots.


Both the hippopotamus and pig cannot sweat due to the fact that they have no sweat glands. The platypus is the only mammal that does not have live young; they lay eggs. Lastly, every mammal produces milk, it's part of what classifies them as mammals (but then again, so is having live young, but that's been proven wrong). By the way, the female platypus will produce milk for her young.


yes they do it is pink and rich they also sweat it is also pink


The main distinguishing feature of mammals is that the females of each species has mammary glands that produce milk. Females lactate only once pregnant; and the milk is used to suckle their infants. The mammary glands usually issue the milk from teats (aka nipples), but in the earlier mammals and monotremes (such as the duck-billed platypus, the milk simple oozes out of the gland and through the fur.The mammary glands are derived from sweat glands; and it follows that mammals must have sweat glands. However, some mammals, such as dogs, have lost their sweat glands, even though they retain mammary glands.So how was milk discovered? Answer: by hungry infant mammals.


Yes and no. In monotremes, which includes the platypus, there are mammary glands but no teats. When producing the milk, the mother excretes milk out of pores in the skin and the young platypuses lick the milk off the abdomen. The mother has grooves specifically designed to keep milk that is excreted out.


It's a modified sweat gland. Milk is essentially modified sweat, which is produced by mammary glands. Sebaceous glands produce sebum, which is this oily substance designed to lubricate skin and hair. This prevents the cells from drying out.


Sweat glands exhibit a glandular type called an exocrine gland. Other examples of exocrine glands are milk, saliva and digestive juices.


sperm, saliva, blood, and breast milk. sweat will not transmit aids


No. Echidnas do not have nipples, but exude milk from specialised sweat glands which run into grooves on their abdomen.



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