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Answered 2008-09-13 19:01:47

our garage burned down and it was insured for 19,000. If we only replace it with a shed, do we get the balance?

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In a simple mortgage,the mortgagor without delivering possession of the mortgaged property binds himself personally to pay the mortgage money and agrees expressly or impliedly that if he fails to pay the debt and interest in terms of the mortgaged deed, the property will be sold and the proceeds applied in payment to the mortgaged money.In an English mortgage,a mortgagor binds himself to repay the mortgaged money on certain date and transfers the mortgaged property absolutely to the mortgagee subject to the provision that he will re-transfer it to the mortgagor upon payment of the mortgaged money as agreed.


When A Hotel Or House Is Mortgaged, you get the money they serve you... then if anyone comes to it, they wont pay you


On the back of your property card you will see a Mortgage Amount (MA). To mortgage a property flip it over, and take the MA from the bank. If someone lands on the mortagaged property, they do not have to pay rent. However, when you own all the properties in one color, you double the original rent on the property card; even if one of the cards in the set of one color is mortgaged, the rent is still doubled (remember though, you do NOT collect rent on the actual mortgaged property). To un-mortgage a property, flip it back over and pay the MA back to the bank; also add 10% interest on the money you pay back to the bank. Then you can go back to using your property as normal. P.S. You can trade/sell a mortgaged property to another player. The property stays mortgaged though. As soon as they get that property, they must pay 10% interest of the MA to the bank EVEN if they DON'T want to unmortgage the property yet. If they elect to just pay the interest, but not the MA, the property stays mortgaged. Then when they want to un-mortgage it, they must pay the MA as well as another 10% in interest.


I doubt that the law requires it, but your mortgage company certainly does - if your house is damaged beyond repair and you depart, the company will want the means to get its money back.


total property damage was estimated at $81 billion (2005 USD)


1. Your insurance agency, if you don't have it, your paying for the car yourself 2. A property damage lawyer, so you don't get sued for ridiculous amounts of money


if your property is damaged, an icon will appear on the page that says repair cost. if you have enough money and click repair, the life of the property will be back to full.


Most policies will pay for roof damage on an "Actual cash value" basis until the roof is replaced. Then, IF you have replacement cost coverage they will make up the difference of the amount paid under actual cash value and actual replacement cost, LESS the amount of your deductible. If you elect not to repair or replace the roof, your insurance company could exclude your roof from further damage or additional payments until you show the monies paid to you were used to repair or replace as indicated by their estimate and claim payment. Otherwise, the money is yours unless the home is mortgaged. If it is mortgaged, the check should have been made to you and the mortgagee, and if the mortgagee endorses it it is yours.


The loan doesn't 'override the will'. It is a matter of rights in property and debts. The debts of a testator must be paid before any property is distributed to the heirs. In the case of a mortgaged property, the testator doesn't own the property free and clear so she can't give it to her heirs. She conveyed it to a bank in return for a large sum of money while she was living. The bank owns a security interest in the property until the money has been repaid. The heirs have the option of paying the loan on the property (if they want to keep it), conveying their interest to the bank or or allowing the bank to take possession by foreclosure.


Return to the court and request a judgment lien. It can be recorded in the land records and any real property owned by the defendant cannot be mortgaged or sold until the lien is paid. The judgment lien can also be used by the sheriff to seize any other personal property to satisfy the amount owed.Return to the court and request a judgment lien. It can be recorded in the land records and any real property owned by the defendant cannot be mortgaged or sold until the lien is paid. The judgment lien can also be used by the sheriff to seize any other personal property to satisfy the amount owed.Return to the court and request a judgment lien. It can be recorded in the land records and any real property owned by the defendant cannot be mortgaged or sold until the lien is paid. The judgment lien can also be used by the sheriff to seize any other personal property to satisfy the amount owed.Return to the court and request a judgment lien. It can be recorded in the land records and any real property owned by the defendant cannot be mortgaged or sold until the lien is paid. The judgment lien can also be used by the sheriff to seize any other personal property to satisfy the amount owed.


If there is any damage to the rented property he can get additional money to compensate; otherwise he is limited to the rent owed.


This property or money is referred to as "bond."


ANSWERIn most states the statue of Limitations is:1). Personal Injury- 2 years2). Property Damage- 3 years


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Asian carp could seriously damage commercial fishing by crowding out other species in the U.S., costing fishermen and companies money.


The noun 'damage' is a concrete noun as a word for physical harm caused to something so that it is broken, ruined, or injured.The noun 'damage' is an abstract noun as a word for harm to property or a person; the estimated money equivalent for loss or injury sustained; a word for a concept.


Of course not. Insurance is supposed to put you back to the same position you were in before the damage occurred. Your not "entitled" to make money on a claim. If your property was repaired the contract was fulfilled.


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No. What you suggest is wrong on many levels. There would not be full disclosure on your part. It is assumed that you will execute a purchase and sale contract in which you agree to deliver marketable title free and clear of defects and encumbrances except those listed. If you didn't list the mortgage you would be committing a fraudulent act. Also, when you signed your mortgage you agreed that the lender is entitled to full payment of the outstanding balance upon any transfer of the title. By keeping money from the sale and not paying off the mortgage you would be in breach of the mortgage contract. What you suggest in your question is dishonest.


According to news, Charlie caused around $50 million (1951 USD, $380 million 2005 USD) in crop and property damage, 152 deaths, injured 2,000, and left 25,000 homeless.


You got it! If you've got uninsured motorists property damage, then your company will pay for the damage to your vehicle caused by the uninsured motorcycle operator. You may have a small detuctible, $200-$300, and the the insurance company will sue the at-fault party to recover both the money they spent and your deductible, this process is called subrogation. The process works the same if you don't have the uninsured motorists property damage coverage but do have collision.


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