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Ten things that were not rationed?

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2010-05-03 06:38:28
2010-05-03 06:38:28

Water was not rationed. Potatoes were not rationed because they were plentiful in the USA but in England they were rationed. Depending on which country or area where you lived pork meats were not rationed. Things like salt. baking soda, spices, vanilla, baking powder were not on the ration lists. Some medicines were not rationed but antibiotics and medicines needed in the war front were rationed amongst the medical facilities. In the USA some vegetables and fruit did not need to be rationed but the people were encouraged to grow victory gardens so the vegetables and fruits used in the military forces' rations and kitchens could be plentiful. In England they had rationing for ten years and it was for an extensive list of things. Cars were not rationed because they discontinued building cars in both countries. The gasoline was rationed as well as tires. Blackout Drapery and Curtains were not rationed. Sand bags were not rationed. Things like dishes, photos, stationary, etc were not rationed.

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