Possessive Nouns

The shoes of a man---give possessive nouns?

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2013-04-30 21:46:44
2013-04-30 21:46:44

The possessive phrase are the man's shoes.

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"The shoes of the horse" is not a sentence, it is a noun phrase; the phrase has no verb. There is no possessive noun is the phrase. The possessive form for the phrase is: "The horse'sshoes...".


A possessive noun is used to show ownership, possession, purpose, or origin of that noun for someone or something.Possessive nouns are formed by adding an apostrophe -s to the end of the noun, or just an apostrophe to plural nouns that already end with -s.Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's assignmentthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of my neighbor = my neighbor's houseExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoesthe houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses


Possessive nouns are formed by adding an apostrophe -s to the end of the noun, or just an apostrophe to some singular and plural nouns that already end with -s.Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of my neighbor = my neighbor's housethe frame of the glasses = the glasses' frameExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoes


Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of the neighbor = my neighbor's housethe flag of France = France's flag


A possessive noun is formed by adding an apostrophe -s to the end of the word, or just an apostrophe to plural nouns that already end with -s. Example singular possessive nouns: the cover of the book = the book's cover the teacher of our class = our class's teacher the shoes of the man = the man's shoes the house of my neighbor = my neighbor's house Example plural possessive nouns: covers of the books = the books' covers the assembly of the classes = the classes assembly the shoes for men = men's shoes the houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses Possessive nouns indicate ownership or possession. the car of my mother = my mother's car the teacher of our class = our class's teacher the coats of the children = the children's coats the covers of the books = the books' covers Possessive nouns indicate origin or purpose. children's shoes; not shoes belonging to children, shoes intended for children ladies' room; the room isn't owned by a group of women, it's a room intended for their use Shakespeare's plays are not possessed by Shakespeare, they're plays by Shakespeare. today's newspaper, today can't own or possess, the newspaper originated today


The punctuation to show possession is an apostrophe.Singular possessive nouns are formed by adding an apostrophe s to the end of a noun.For plural nouns that end in -s, the possessive are formed by adding an apostrophe after the existing -s.For irregular plural nouns that don't end with -s, the possessive is formed by adding the apostrophe s, the same as a singular noun.Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of my neighbor = my neighbor's houseExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoesthe houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses



Words that show ownership are possessive nouns an possessive pronouns.Possessive nouns are formed by adding an apostrophe -s to the end of the word, or just an apostrophe to plural nouns that already end with -s.Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of the neighbor = my neighbor's houseExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assignmentthe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoesthe houses of the neighbors = the neighbors’ housesThere are two types of possessive pronouns:Possessive pronouns are words that take the place of a noun that belongs to someone or something.The possessive pronouns are: mine, yours, hers, his, its, ours, theirs.Possessive adjectives are words that describe a noun as belonging to someone or something. Possessive adjectives are usually placed just before the noun they describe.The possessive adjectives are: my, your, his, hers, its, our, their.Example sentences:Possessive pronoun: The Browns live on this street. That house is theirs.Possessive adjective: The Browns live on this street. That is their house.


For singular nouns, an apostrophe s ('s) is placed at the end of the word. For plural noun that already end with an s, place an apostrophe (') after the ending s.Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of the neighbor = my neighbor's houseExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoesthe houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses


The fixture's screws are loose. - singular possessive.The fixtures' screws are all loose. - plural possessive.


The possessive form for 'the shoes of the horse' is the horse's shoes.


Yes, an apostrophe is used to show possession.A possessive noun is formed by adding an apostrophe -s to the end of the word, or just an apostrophe to plural nouns that already end with -s.Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of my neighbor = my neighbor's houseExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoesthe houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses


Possessive nouns indicating ownership or possession:the car of my mother = my mother's carthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coats of the children = the children's coatsthe covers of the books = the books' coversPossessive nouns indicating origin or purpose:children's shoes; shoes intended for childrenladies' room; a room intended for the use of womenShakespeare's plays; plays by Shakespeare.today's newspaper; the newspaper originated today


The possessive form of the plural noun shoes is shoes'.Examples: These shoes' prices are really high.


Possessive nouns are formed by adding -'s for singular possessives and plurals not ending in -s, and -' for the possessive of plurals that end in -s .Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of my neighbor = my neighbor's houseExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men'sshoesthe houses of the neighbors - the neighbors' housesPossessive pronouns never have an apostrophe. There are two types of possessive pronouns:Possessive pronouns take the place of a noun that belongs to someone or something.They are: mine, yours, his, hers, its, ours, theirs.Example:The chicken is yours and the tuna is mine.Possessive adjectives describe a noun as belonging to someone or something. A possessive adjective is placed just before the noun it describes.They are: my, your, his, her, their, its.Example: How is yourchicken? My tuna is delicious.


The possessive pronoun form: the diver's shoes.


Plural possessive nouns are two or more people, places, or things that show ownership


Example singular possessive nouns:baby's bottlechurch's steeple


A possessive noun is a noun indicating ownership, possession, purpose, or origin.Possessives are formed by adding an apostrophe -s ('s) to the end of the word, or just an apostrophe to plural nouns that already end with -s.Forming a plural possessive noun is dependent on whether the plural noun ends with an -s or does not.Example plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoesthe houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses


Yes, an apostrophe is used to change a noun into a possessive form.Singular possessives are formed by adding an apostrophe s ('s) to the end of a noun.For plural nouns that end in s, the possessive is formed by adding an apostrophe after the existing s (')For irregular plural nouns that don't end with s, the possessive is formed by adding the apostrophe s ('s) to the end of the word, the same as for a singular noun.Example singular possessive nouns:the cover of the book = the book's coverthe teacher of our class = our class's teacherthe coat of the child = the child's coatthe shoes of the man = the man's shoesthe house of my neighbor = my neighbor's houseExample plural possessive nouns:the covers of the books = the books' coversthe assembly of classes = the classes' assemblythe coats of the children = the children's coatsshoes for men = men's shoesthe houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' housesNote: The possessive forms of pronouns do not use an apostrophe to indicate possession.


Possessive nouns describe something in the sentence as belonging to that noun.Possessive pronouns take the place of a noun that belongs to someone or something.The pronouns that are possessive adjectives are more similar to possessive nouns in that they describe a noun as belonging to someone or something.Both possessive nouns and possessive adjectives are placed just before the noun that they describe.EXAMPLESpossessive noun: The Brown's house is on the corner.possessive adjective: Their house is on the corner.possessive pronoun: The house on the corner is theirs.possessive nouns: Jane's mother is also John's aunt.possessive adjectives: Her mother is also his aunt.possessive pronoun: Jane's mother is also mine. Jane is my sister.


Possessives are formed by adding an apostrophe -s to the end of the word, or just an apostrophe to plural nouns that already end with -s. Example singular possessive nouns: the cover of the book = the book's cover the teacher of our class = our class's teacher the coat of the child = the child's coat the shoes of the man = the man's shoes the house of the neighbor = my neighbor's house Example plural possessive nouns: the covers of the books = the books' covers the assembly of classes = the classes' assembly the coats of the children = the children's coats shoes for men = men's shoes the houses of the neighbors = the neighbors' houses


Possessives are formed by adding an apostrophe -s ('s) to the end of the word, or just an apostrophe (') to plural nouns that already end with -s. Example singular possessive nouns: the cover of the book = the book's cover the teacher of our class = our class's teacher the coat of the child = the child's coat the shoes of the man = the man's shoes the house of Mr. Morris = Mr. Morris's house Example plural possessive nouns: the covers of the books = the books' covers the assembly of classes = the classes' assembly the coats of the children = the children's coats shoes for men = men's shoes the house of the Morrises = the Morrises' house


Examples of three possessive nouns are:my mother's carthe city's skylinethe dog's collar




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