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Answered 2010-11-22 15:09:45

False. It was President Abraham Lincoln during the USA Civil War Between the States, (in 1863), who made Thanksgiving a national holiday in the USA.

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George Washington proclaimed Thursday, November 26, 1789 to be a national day of thanksgiving.


In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November.


George Washington proclaimed a National Day of Thanksgiving to be November 26th, 1789. It was not an annual holiday however.


George washington, in 1789 declared November 26 a day of thanksgiving


President George Washington proclaimed Thursday, November 26, 1789 to be "a day of public thanksgiving and prayer". He proclaimed a second Thanksgiving Day on Thursday, February 19, 1795. It wasn't until 1863 that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday of November of every year to be "a day of Thanksgiving". In June 1870 it legally became a paid holiday for federal employees working within the District of Columbia. In 1885 the law was expanded to apply to federal employees nationwide. In 1939 and 1940, in order to help retail businesses by making the Christmas shopping season longer, President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaimed Thanksgiving Day to be the third Thursday of November. So many people protested the change in the Thanksgiving tradition that, as a compromise, Congress passed a bill making the fourth Thursday of November Thanksgiving Day. President Roosevelt signed the bill into law on December 26, 1941, and it remains in effect to this day.




In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed that the final Thursday of November would be celebrated as a day of Thanksgiving. Presidents followed his lead and it became the tradition to celebrate the Thanksgiving Day at this time. In 1941, Congress formally declared that Thanksgiving Day would be celebrated on the fourth Thursday in November.


George Washington declared the first national day of Thanksgiving, but that was a one-time thing. Abraham Lincoln restarted it. It was originally the last Thursday in November, but in 1941, it officially became the fourth Thursday in November (sometimes November has five Thursdays). And technically, it still has to be proclaimed by the President every year, although that is a given.


In the middle of the US Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln, prompted by a series of editorials written by Sarah Hale, proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day, to be celebrated on the final Thursday in November 1863. It has been celebrated anually since. However President George Washington was the first President to issue a Proclamation that declared a National Day of Thanksgiving on October 3, 1789.


George Washington [February 22, 1732-December 14, 1799], as the first U.S. President, issued a proclamation on October 3, 1789. By that proclamation, he asked the nation to observe a national day of Thanksgiving. He set the date for November 26th.


President George Washington proclaimed the first national day of thanksgiving in 1789, but it was president Abraham Lincoln who officially declared the last Thursday in November Thanksgiving, beginning in 1863. It was during the Civil War, and Lincoln's proclamation advised people to make this holiday a special time for family, religion, and community. Much later, President Franklin Roosevelt moved Thanksgiving to the third Thursday of November to create a longer Christmas shopping season. But in 1941, Congress made Thanksgiving fall on the fourth Thursday in November, and it's been that way ever since!


Since Abraham Lincoln proclaimed Thanksgiving an official holiday in 1863, there has not been a president who didn't celebrate Thanksgiving. Traditionally, Thanksgiving fell on the last Thursday in November. In 1939, President Roosevelt broke this tradition. That year, November had five Thursdays, so Roosevelt declared that Thanksgiving should be celebrated on the fourth Thursday of the month. He did this because the country was suffering from the Great Depression, and he thought the economy could use an extra week of holiday shopping between Thanksgiving and Christmas.


Why Thursday? Because President Washington wanted it that way. Back in 1789, President George Washington declared Thursday, November 26, to be a national holiday of Thanksgiving. This was the first official American Thanksgiving to be held as a holiday. Thanksgiving was then held every year on the last Thursday of November. (Before that, different colonies, then states, held thanksgiving when they wanted.) In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared that Thanksgiving would be the second-to-last Thursday of November rather than the last. Why? Because that gave more shopping days between Thanksgiving and Christmas.


Lincoln proclaimed a national day of thanksgiving in 1863. Franklin Roosevelt got Congress to make Thanksgiving a federal holiday in 1941. FDR had the day moved up a week wnenever November had 5 Thursdays.[[Which president legalized thanksgiving&action=edit|]] [Discuss:Which_president_legalized_thanksgiving ] [javascript:getUpdates(1); ]Read more: [[Which president legalized thanksgiving#ixzz16ANW45R1|http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Which_president_legalized_thanksgiving#ixzz16ANW45R1]]


President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed, in 1863, a national Thanksgiving day for the last Thursday in November. he hoped that having a national celebration would help re-unify the North and the South .Thanksgiving days were celebrated since the beginning of America but before 1863, states set their dates for Thanksgiving.In 1941, Franklin Roosevelt got Congress to move the date to always be the fourth Thursday in November


October 3, 1789 was the date on which first U.S. President George Washington [February 22, 1732-December 14, 1799] proclaimed a national day of Thanksgiving. He identified that day as November 26th. The holiday continued to be observed, but not on a national level. Its observance tended to be in New England. But the date varied widely, from sometime in October to sometime in January.


Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving date in 1863 and it was traditionally celebrated on the last Thursday in November. In 1941 Franklin Roosevelt got Congress to declare a federal holiday on the fourth Thursday in November which moved it up a week in those years that have five Thursdays in November.


Why did president Abe Linccon move Thanksgiving day to the fourth thursday of November?


President Abraham Lincoln


President Franklin Delano Roosevelt changed Thanksgiving to be the fourth Thursday in November as opposed to the third.


US President Franklin Delano Roosevelt changed the Thanksgiving date to the fourth Thursday in November.


If you want to know "Why Thursday?"...It wasn't until the third year of the Civil War, on October 3, 1863, that Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving. After the war, in 1865, the last Thursday in November was proclaimed the national Thanksgiving day. But in 1951, because of public outcry, the US Congress named the fourth Thursday of November as the official Thanksgiving Day, and it has remained ever since. Similarity of November 25, Thanksgiving; December 25, Christmas Day. Both a blissful holiday.


President George Washington was the first president to proclaim a national day of Thanksgiving, in 1789 and 1795, but each proclamation applied only to that single year. President John Adams did the same thing in 1798 and 1799 and President Madison in 1814 and 1815. After that, individual states, if they wished to, declared their own days of Thanksgiving, until 1863. Author Sarah Josepha Hale had written letters to politicians and editorials for around 40 years trying to make Thanksgiving an official holiday. President Lincoln, influenced by this and by a desire to foster a sense of unity among all the states during the Civil War, proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day, to be celebrated on the final Thursday in November 1863. Lincoln's successors as president followed his example of annually declaring the final Thursday in November to be Thanksgiving. A small change was made In 1939, when November had five Thursdays. President Franklin D. Roosevelt declared the fourth Thursday, rather than the last one, in November as Thanksgiving. hoping that the longer post-Thanksgiving, pre-Christmas gift-buying period would help the economy, still suffering from the Great Depression. None of the presidential declarations of Thanksgiving Day were legally binding; a President is not allowed to make law, just execute those passed by Congress. Therefore, Thanksgiving did not become an official legal holiday until 1941, when Congress passed a resolution requiring that Thanksgiving be observed nationally on the fourth Thursday of November, and President Roosevelt signed it.


The first Thanksgiving was on Thursday, November 26, 1789, and the second Thanksgiving was on Thursday, February 19, 1795. In 1863, President Lincoln proclaimed that Thanksgiving Day be observed every year on the last Thursday of November, which is the Thursday after Nov. 23 and before Dec. 1. From 1863 through 1938, there were only two years in which Thanksgiving was not observed on the last Thursday of November. In 1939 and 1940, during the Great Depression, President Franklin Roosevelt made Thanksgiving the third Thursday of November (Nov. 16, 1939 and Nov. 21, 1940) in the hopes of boosting the economy by making the Christmas shopping season longer. So many people were against the change that Congress passed a bill in 1941 which, as a compromise, made Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday of November, which is the Thursday after Nov. 21 and before Nov. 29. President Roosevelt signed it into law on Friday, December 26, 1941.