Wasps and Hornets

What are murder hornets?

Sounds awful. Are they really all that bad?

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Brielle Cruickshank
2020-05-11 15:41:13

Asian giant hornets, terrifyingly nicknamed "murder hornets," are really nasty creatures. At up to an inch and a half in length, they're the largest hornets in the world. They prey on beehives, decapitating their victims and then sticking around to eat the immature bees in a horrifyingly named process called "slaughter and occupy." Murder hornets, indeed.

Their sting is very painful to humans, but they don't typically bug people unless they're provoked. The bigger concern with their introduction to America is that they threaten bee populations that are already on the decline. Asian honeybees have defenses against the murder hornets—if one gets into their hive, they gather around it and vibrate their flight muscles, making too much heat and carbon dioxide for the hornet to survive. This defense gets the deceptively cute nickname of "bee ball." Honeybees in the U.S. don't make bee balls, however, and are thus really vulnerable to the murder hornets, which is why beekeepers are trying to get rid of them.

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sam swierz
2020-05-12 17:20:46

Asian giant hornets, terrifyingly nicknamed "murder hornets," are really nasty creatures. At up to an inch and a half in length, they're the largest hornets in the world. They prey on beehives, decapitating their victims and then sticking around to eat the immature bees in a horrifyingly named process called "slaughter and occupy." Murder hornets, indeed.

Their sting is very painful to humans, but they don't typically bug people unless they're provoked. The bigger concern with their introduction to America is that they threaten bee populations that are already on the decline. Asian honeybees have defenses against the murder hornets—if one gets into their hive, they gather around it and vibrate their flight muscles, making too much heat and carbon dioxide for the hornet to survive. This defense gets the deceptively cute nickname of "bee ball." Honeybees in the U.S. don't make bee balls, however, and are thus really vulnerable to the murder hornets, which is why beekeepers are trying to get rid of them.

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danielolabodeoguntuyi30034
2020-05-16 06:29:54

Murder hornets so called in my dialect; Agbón, because of its virulent act, it stings and destroys every other less ants around it. These hornets are likewise beneficial as they aid pollination.

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the war of destiny
2020-05-16 05:23:02

Mosquitoes bite when they're hungry. Asian giant hornets sting when they're scared

Like wasps and bees, the Asian giant hornet probably doesn't sting people unless it feels threatened. If you left it alone, it likely wouldn't bother you, Reeves said -- antagonize them at your own peril.

Mosquitoes, though, bite because they're hungry. Female mosquitoes rely on blood to load up on the protein they need to make their eggs (ah yes, baby mosquitoes -- the last thing we need!).

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Christ Ballerina
2020-05-18 17:38:38

Wow these things are painful don't let these guys sting you.

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Anonymous
2020-05-13 18:43:42

murderous wasp things

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Anonymous
2020-05-12 15:22:48

hfrt

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Anonymous
2020-05-19 21:50:31

swarm

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Anonymous
2020-05-15 15:21:00

History of murder hornets

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Anonymous
2020-05-14 13:46:59

really bad bees

i havent seen any because they havent made it to where i live yet

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Anonymous
2020-05-14 09:36:45

murderous wasp things that want to kill bees

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Anonymous
2020-05-12 18:55:45

the are another spechies of wasps and the sting really really badly!


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