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What are the advantages and disadvantages of a fiberglass swimming pool lining in a gunite pool?

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2008-11-10 18:34:19
2008-11-10 18:34:19

There are no disadvantages if the pool is properly prepared and, most importantly, the right materials are used to create the fiberglass shell. It is up to the consumer to demand the specific resin, fiberglass mat weight, and gelcoat that will be used in the application. When the materials are delivered, no matter who delivers it, the consumer must demand the Material Data Safety Sheets MSDS, and verify that they represent the exact materials ordered. Then the MSDS must be compared to the Chemical Manufacturers labels before the shipment is accepted. Once you accept it, you're stuck. Assuming the right (which happen to be the most expensive) chemicals and fiberglass are used, and the gelcoat is applied in a timely fashion, (to achieve a chemical bond), the pool will not leak for at least 30 years. The maintenance and chemical usage will be reduced by more than 50%, and the pool will look new and beautiful once again. Between 12 and 18 years later, depending upon pool use and care, the pool will need to be re-gelcoated. Salt water chlorination increases the longevity of the original gelcoat toward the upper end of the term.

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Either gunite or fiberglass will work well for an indoor pool.

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A fiberglass pool requires less maintenance, less repairs structurally in the future, is quick to install, and is good for smaller pools. Gunite pools are better for a pool deeper than 8 feet, custom shapes, and is a bit harder on the feet than a fiberglass pool.

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Swimming pool types include above-ground pools, fiberglass pools, vinyl-lined, gunite and poured-concrete pools. Learn the pros and cons of each type of pool.

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Both pools have many features Both fiberglass and gunite swimming pools can have almost all the same custom accessories and great equipment. You can design any size or shape gunite pool shell and customize the surface to almost any color quite easily. A fiberglass pool shell manufacturer is like a boat dealer with a catalog of models produced and custom sizes are generally not available. A fiberglass pool can be installed a bit faster than a gunite pool but the major investment you will make in either project usually never warrants a decision based on a few weeks time built sooner. Your gunite pool can have a built in hot tub or water feature , but your fiberglass pool can also. You have more options with coping on a gunite pool than fiberglass, but your fiberglass pool can still be made to look like a gunite pool if you like. A fiberglass pool shell can have a lifetime warranty for factory defects and most gunite builders also offer a similar warranty, I always say though when is the last time you saw a defective bag of concrete or tub of fiberglass resin? The surfaces of both pools can be as diverse as the pools themselves, you can go with white polyester gel coat on fiberglass or white marcite on gunite, your choice can be a custom quartz finish with a fiberglass pool or a custom quartz finish with a gunite shell also, with each pool shell having a respective warranty for finish from as little as one year to as many as 10 full years or more. Both finishes are very dependent on your skills as a pool-owner to manage them, all information you learned when you bought your pool from a licensed , insured swimming pool professional. Fiberglass pool shells rarely get deeper than 8 foot the minimum standard for a diving pool, while a custom shell with gunite can be built to exceed many standards. The old myths of falty fiberglass and gunite swimming pools have been propagated by dealers long since gone out of business. If your looking for a reliable and safe pool that keeps its value backed by strong dealer sales and service networks fiberglass and gunite are equally great choices and readily available. It's never been a better time to be in the circle of pool ownership. getapool.com good swimming

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u can NOT convert one into another.... ud have to rip it out and start over... either gunite or fiberglass

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Some of the benefits of Gunite swimming pools are extnded warranty and reliability. They are a great brand.

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I am researching the same question and this is what I have found so far: having a "freeze line" is not a good condition for fiberglass pools. Fiberglass pools are cheaper to install and use less chemicals to maintain. I was told the chemicals also do less damage to fiberglass, if any?, than to gunite pools. Fiberglass pools must be filled at all times to avoid "popping up". The only thing that still has me leaning towards gunite is a custom pool shape we have in mind. Hope this helps. I am also trying to decide between fibergalss and gunite. I have been told (by a gunite dealer) that there is a problem with staining in fiberglass pools. Besides a low water level, what else might cause a fiberglass pool to pop up?

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gunite is a type of sprayed sand cement used for the bottoms and sides of pools then fiberglass panels are fitted in to form the complete side to the top Fiberglass pools are also produced as complete pools and shipped to site by truck. the obvious difference here is that one pool is made from reinforced cement "Gunite", reinforced concrete, "shotcrete" and reinforced fiberglass and all kinds of systems in between.

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Gunite and concrete pools can be insulated by resurfacing with fiberglass. Because fiberglass is non-porous, heat is not lost through the plaster finish. If the pool is already fiberglass, there is nothing further that can be done, unless the pool is not yet installed in which case a spray of insulating material can be given to the outside of the fibreglass pool prior to installation.

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How to resurface a gunite (or concrete) pool with fiberglass is explained in "Pool Resurfacing Made Easy" written in 1999 by Bill Nash, CEO of UGlassIt Pool Resurfacing, Inc. It can be ordered online at uglassit.com/order_book.htm. The company provides all the material and supplies necessary for the resurfacing of all kinds of swimming pools, plus telephone help is available 7 days weekly.

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Hum, not sure if you can actually plaster a fiberglass pool. The glass would have to be removed first. You will have to consult a pool builder, a company that installs fiberglass shells or a company that installs fiberglass in plastered pools - thus converting a gunite/plaster pool into a gunite/fiberglass pool. The later uses the old pool shell as the sub-grade or foundation so to speak. k

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No. They should perform equally well in any state that has similar weather conditions.

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I think gunite, they stay looking good for longer and when they they tart to look a bit lack luster in time you can refurbish them to look like new again far more easily then fiber glass. they also sit in the ground better. however there are many people that are very happy with fiberglass pools.

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I doubt it, Gunite is normally used in swimming pool structures and it could very well look like asphalt

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According to an ad for a fiberglass pool company, it is because of the abrasiveness of gunite and for being in the pool too long. I am still looking for other answers and solutions to this question as well.

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Although the maintenance and cost of construction is higher than of fiberglass, it will hold up probably years longer than fiberglass. Especially if you will be having kids around- they can be tough on things, and fiberglass can get expensive if you end up with enough scratches, etc.

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Gunite Swimming Pools are the best type of swimming pool out there, provided that the pool is correctly built they can be installed anywhere in the world without any damage being done to them. As far as servicing of the pool standard service applies e.i. brushing vacuuming chemically treating. And if the necessary care is taken a gunite can last you 20 + years. Vinyl Liner pools also have there place in the swimming pool market place, they are typically cheaper and quicker to install but on the down side there isn't much customization you can do to them. And to replace a liner can run you anywhere between 3 to 5 thousand dollars. That brings us to fiberglass AKA Bathtub in the ground ( that's all i can say about that.

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In my opinion, none! Stick with Marcite. I completely disagree. With 19 years experience in the restoration of older swimming pools, I have learned that fiberglass swimming pools are the best of the best. My business is limited to older pools, so my expertise is in swimming pool longevity, therefor my answer is: If you expect to own the pool for more than 15 years, and if you can afford a gunite, concrete, or fiberglass pool, you should definitely choose fiberglass. On the other hand, if price is the issue, you should choose a vinyl liner pool which will cost about half that of gunite, concrete, or fiberglass. Unfortunately, when you decide to sell, a vinyl liner pool will actually detract from the value of the home. On a geographical basis, Florida is a great place for a fiberglass swimming pool, but so are the rest of the Continental United States. Location does not matter, regardless of what you may read in these forums. The only thing that does matter is that you never empty the pool without professional assistance. The same rule applies to vinyl liner pools. The only advantage to gunite and concrete pools is that you can usually get away with emptying the pool without help. But even concrete and gunite pools can be seriously damaged if the pool is emptied without consideration for hydrostatic pressure. Just like construction of a gunite, concrete, or vinyl liner pool is quite important, so is the installation of a fiberglass pool. It is not a DIY project for most people. Another important factor with fiberglass is the manufacturer of the pool. I consider the very best to be San Juan pools because no San Juan pool owner has ever contacted our company for restoration before the pool was at least 27 years old. Finally, there is no such thing as a surface that will last a "lifetime", unless you consider a lifetime to be 20 years or less (excluding only San Juan). Frankly, I thought 20 years was a "generation", but the pool manufacturer's and builders seem to have the two terms confused. Fiberglass requires considerably less chemicals and far less maintenance that any other pool currently in existence.

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Age doesn't really matter, as long as the pool is gunite or concrete. But never acid wash a fiberglass pool, or a fiberglass lining in a gunite or concrete pool. I suppose I should explain why, because so few pool pro's understand fiberglass, you will probably receive considerable conflicting information. The finish coat on all fiberglass pools manufactured in a factory is swimming pool gel coat. Unfortunately, this is not true of all fiberglass linings in gunite and concrete pools, although it should be. Gel coat is non-porous which is why it's such a fantastic finish, at least for the first 18-20 years, after which it becomes porous and must be removed and replaced. Using muriatic acid on non-porous gel coat will cause it to become porous, at which time it becomes worthless, and must be removed then replaced with new gel coat. Once it's replaced, you're good for another 18-20 years, unless muriatic acid is again used. -Bill

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Yes, fiberglass pools have a smooth finish. Where a concrete pool was a pourus and rougher finish that gives alge something to grab on to. Also staining it. A low calcium level can pit a concrete pool, not a fiberglass, plus a fiberglass pool is more flexible,so ground movement wont crack it. In the long run the extra money you pay for fiberglass is worth it.

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Our experience shows that gunite or fiberglass are good. Gunite would probably last the longest. CONCRETE tends to crack over years with normal ground shifts. Had two pools with concrete, so many cracks after 10 years, buried the thing, the repair costs were astronomical.


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