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This is an exercise in logic. If an unstoppable force exists, then an immovable object cannot exist, because it would be able to be moved by the unstoppable force, and vice versa. Sideways Logic The unstoppable force does not "stop", the immovable object does not move : the unstoppable force ricochets off the immovable object!

2009-08-29 05:10:41
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Related Questions

What were to happen if an immovable object was collided by an unstoppable force?

Quite simply, there is no such thing as an "immovable object" or an "unstoppable force". In general, what happens when a force acts on an object is described by Newton's Second Law.


What happens when an unstopabul force meat an emovebal object?

Obviously you can't have both an unstoppable force and an immovable object. If the force moves the object, then the object isn't unmovable. If the force doesn't move it, then the force isn't unstoppable.


What do you use lube for?

What happens when an unstoppable force hits an immovable object? You need a bit of lube, that's what.


What net force is acting on an immobile object?

It would have to be an unstoppable force if the object was immovable.


How do you use immovable in a sentence?

The immovable object met the irresistible force- and the sparks really flew.


What happens when an object that cannot be stopped collides with and object that cannot be moved?

You mean what happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object? Well... that is a paradox. In a world where there is an unstoppable force, by definition, there cannot be an immovable object, and vice versa. And let's just say there were such things. When the collide, there will be an infinite transfer of energy. The unstoppable force will have infinite momentum and the immovable object will have infinite inertia. And when they collide, because according to the law of conservation of energy, energy is never created or destroyed, the energy will be constantly exchanged among the two hypothetical objects.


What would happen if an immovable object got hit by an unstoppable force?

If the unstoppable object was smaller, then it would pierce a hole through the immovable object, not moving the object, and not stopping.


A sentence using the word irresistible?

I would like to see what happens when an immovable object meets an irresistible force. Her perfume was irresistible.


Is there a question that cannot be answered that doesnt have to do with science?

Basic paradoxes are examples of questions that cannot be answered. For example, what happens when an immovable object meets an unstoppable force? Since neither an immovable object nor an unstoppable force exist in reality, there is no way to determine what would happen in this theoretical situation. Source: personal experience


What would happen if an irresistible force met an immovable object?

nothing would happen...


What type of muscle contraction occurs when force is exerted against an immovable object?

isometric


What are the release dates for Broken Toy - 2009 Unstoppable Force Immovable Object 2-8?

Broken Toy - 2009 Unstoppable Force Immovable Object 2-8 was released on: USA: 6 February 2013


What is the connection between gunpowder and fireworks?

there is no difference lol thats just like asking what happens when an unstoppable force hits an immovable object - IT TURNS AROUND just because its unstoppable doesnt mean its immovable THE MORE YOU KNOW /god


How do you stop an unstoppable force?

You can't. Hence the name 'unstoppable'. An unstoppable force, upon hitting something, would push the other object aside and continue onwards. The only problem is if you have both an unstoppable force and an immovable object. The force can't push the object aside, and the object can't stop the force. The solution is fairly simple, however - the unstoppable force is deflected off to the side when the two collide. It isn't stopped, but continues in a different direction. The immovable object doesn't move. Easy. Alternately, the following happens: the unstoppable force continues straight onwards, and the object doesn't move. Since the two can't change in their actions, space itself is twisted to allow the force to pass through the object without moving it in any way. Having an unstoppable force and an immovable object is both theoretically and practically impossible anyway, so this entire line of questioning is fairly pointless.


What would happen if an unstoppable force strikes an immovable object?

here are a few ideas. (assuming that you break a couple laws of everything.)*The unstoppable force would change the direction of motion.*The Unstoppable force would pass through it.*And the most probable (in this impossible situation): nothing, pure unadulterated nothing.*This is a paradox and it is impossible.The irresistible force paradox, also called the unstoppable force paradox, is a classic paradox formulated as "What happens when an unstoppable force meets an immovable object?" This paradox is a form of the omnipotence paradox, which is a simple demonstration that challenges omnipotence: ("Can God create a stone so heavy that not even God is strong enough to lift it?"). The immovable object and the irresistible force are both implicitly assumed to be indestructible, or else the question would have a trivial resolution ("it destroys it"). Furthermore, it is assumed that they are two separate entities, since an irresistible force is implicitly an immovable object, and vice versa.The paradox arises because it rests on two premises-that there exist such things as irresistible forces and immovable objects-which cannot both be true at once. If there exists an irresistible force, it follows logically that there cannot be any such thing as an immovable object, and vice versa


What would happen if an unstoppable force hits an immovable object?

AnswerThere is no such thing as an unstoppable force, or an immovable object. Things like nuclear explosions or planets come close, but not close enough.AnswerThis is known as the 'Irresistible Force Paradox'.An irresistible force would have to possess (effectively) infinite energy, which is impossible for a finite universe. Also, for a universe in which irresistible forces are possible, immovable objects would not be (therein lies the crux of the paradox). For the sake of the question, we would also have to assume that both are indestructible, subverting the obvious answer that both would be destroyed.This is related to the 'Omniscience Paradox' - the question "can God create a stone that is too heavy for even Him to lift?"If an irresistible force meets an immovable object, the immovable object moves and the irresistible force stops. This is one rational answer for an irrational question.


What happens when an innoposable force hits an unmovable object?

In order to pose your question, you've invented an irresistible force, which can't exist, and an immovable object, which also can't exist. You're doing so well with fiction, you might as well go ahead and postulate a result as well.


What happens when an immovable object is struck by an unstoppable force?

Since these are extremes that cannot be acheived due to the laws of physics, it cannot happen. However, If it could happen, I suspect a paradox would occur.


What happens when a unstoppable force meats an immovable object?

Since these are extremes that cannot be acheived due to the laws of physics, it cannot happen. However, If it could happen, I suspect a paradox would occur.


What happens when applied force on an object is equal to frictional force?

the object will not move


What happens to an object with an unbalanced force?

The object will accelerate.


What would happen if you put an anti-gravity field around a black hole?

That's an excellent question, sort of like "What happens when the Irresistible Force meets the Immovable Object?" We don't know.


What happens to the force after it accelerates an object?

I can say that a force is the ONLY thing that can accelerate an object.


What hapPens to the net force of the object if it is at rest?

In that case, the net force on the object is zero.


Does hydrochloric acid break down pepsin?

No, pepsin being the hardest substance known to man (apart from Obama, the black Chuck Norris), it is completely impervious to everything. The Immoveable Object of the Immovable Object vs. Unstoppable Force match. Buy your tickets for the Unstoppable Force, Chuck Obama, vs. the great Immovable Object, pepsin, only $99.99 at Ticketek.