answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2010-08-10 03:09:57
2010-08-10 03:09:57

Once your insurance has paid, you are responsible for the rest.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


When you cause an accident that damages another vehicle or hurts someone


You are the one legally in the care, custody, and control of the vehicle and therefore are the one who will be cited for driving without insurance. This is just the beginning of your trouble though. If you were at fault, you are also responsible for the damages done in the accident which may include injuries and damages to the vehicle you hit.


Nothing happens if a person that hits someone in their vehicle and their insurance is covered through another state than the accident happened at. Car insurance companies will pay for damages no matter where they happen at.


Usually, if the driver had the owner's permission to drive. What happens if the car is owned by the person that has the accident but the insurance is in your name? However you no longer want to be in that relationship or to have to pay that insurance?


Well Someone will sue you and the insurance will do something about it!


When someone causes an accident and he has no insurance, he is liable to pay for the damages out of his own pocket. Some of the costs may be too much to bear and that is why people are better off having insurance.


When you allow someone to drive your car, you are giving them the coverage of your insurance. If they were to get into an accident, your policy would pay first.


The only thing you can do is pay for all your damages out of pocket. After all it was your decision to drive without insurance.


Your insurance policy most likely has a clause that protects you up to a certin amount if you are in an accident with an uninsured driver. You can also hire a lawer and sue the other driver for any damages (along with lawer and court fees).


Liability insurance pays for someone else's damages if an accident is your fault but won't cover your vehicle. Full coverage provides liability insurance as above but will also cover your damages to your own vehicle in an accident regardless of whose at fault, as well as theft, fire, etc.


Yes. All registered drivers are required to hold liability insurance, which means that if they cause an accident, their insurance will pay for damages to the other peoples' cars. So, if the person does hold the required insurance, and is entirely at fault, your damages will be covered.


== == == == Car insurance follows the car. If someone was injured they can go after the driver if they weren't the owner of the vehicle.


If someone is seeking damages from an injury as a result of an auto accident and they are not satisfied with the offer from the insurance company I would suggest that a lawyer be consulted.


Insurance stays with the vehicle, barring any policly exclusions to the contrary, the insurance that covers the vehicle covers that vehicles actions. If you allow someone to drive your vehicle and they have an accident that is their fault your insurance will be the one that takes care of the damages.


If you have insurance on your car, and someone else is driving it, and has an accident your insurance rate will go up but it will cover the damages to the other persons vehicle.


The other person can sue you because you are at fault for the accident.


Technically, You are responsible for the car because the car insurance is in your name and not theirs. You can also go to court and they will investigate to see who should pay for accidental damages on the car but the Judge can also make the driver pay your cars insurance. It can go either way you or them depending on evidence of the accident.


If there is insurance coverage on the at fault vehicle, there should be no reason to file small claims. If the at-fault party does not have insurance, then small claims is an option.


You can be sued for injuring someone, even unintentionally (as when someone gets hurt on your property). Then you are liable for damages. Liability insurance pays the damages if you lose a lawsuit.


If you have no insurance you may get a ticket, but you will want a police report on the accident to claim their insurance, if they were at fault. so call the cops


No, liability insurance is when there are injuries involved. If you are injured in an accident when someone else is driving your car, your liability insurance would cover your medical costs. Comprehensive and collision insurance on the car you were driving should pay for damages to the vehicle.


Whether you are insured or not, the most important thing in your accident is who is determined to be at fault. If you are at fault you (or your insurance company) will be required to pay for any property damages or medical expenses incurred in an accident. The same would be true for the other person if they were found to be at fault. That is the "civil law" side of things. If you have no insurance and you are driving, you are breaking some pretty serious criminal laws, so legally you could be in a lot of trouble.


In ontario, The person that hits you's insurance has Accident benifits, and they will pay for your medical bills if they were at fault. But if you were drviing without insurance.. consider yourself screwed. Pretty much the same in most states in the U.S. If they were at fault their insurance may pay for your damages but you can still be fined for driving without coverage, license suspended or revoked etc.


You each walk away with nothing - your only recourse is to take the person who hit you to court and sue for damages. However, chances are if that person has no insurance, they have no job, and thus no income which to pay you the damages should the court award in your favor.


It really depends on the type of coverage you have. Normally if that person had permission to drive the vehicle, you have full coverage/collision insurance, and that person was at fault your insurance will cover damages. If someone else caused the accident, you would still receive damages from their insurance if they were insured. Sometimes however the driver's insurance would cover your damages under certain circumstances. As always, it is really best to ask your insurance carrier or refer to your most recent coverage letter from the company.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.