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What is a federal tax lien?


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Answered 2010-09-27 04:13:55

A tax lien is when the IRS files a lien against a tax payer in the courthouse where the taxpayer lives. This lien will attach the the property the tax payer owns. The lien will stay in place until the lien is satisfied or the liability is paid. The lien does not need to be renewd.

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Federal tax lien takes priority over all. Federal tax lien is the center of all federal action taken by the IRS.


The best place to get information on a federal tax lien is a tax agent. They are trained to be able to provide you with the tax information that you require.


Yes, there will be a federal tax lien put on your house that is in forclosure. The bank or person that buys your house will have the option to pay that lien off.


Not without satisfying the lien or you can subordinate a tax lien in order to sell the house. Sometimes, the IRS will allow you to do this, if they believe it will help you to pay your tax liability.


The best way to avoid a federal tax lien is to pay your federal taxes on time. However if you are unable to pay, contact the IRS and they will negotiate a payment plan with you for a small fee.


The IRS files the Notice of Federal Tax Lien (NFTL). The purpose of this is to establish the Government's right of priority against specific third parties.


i dont believe they can state has nothing to do with federal.... atleast i think. the state can touch the state tax but not federal


An individual can get help with a Federal tax lien by visiting the offical irs website and contacting the irs by email or telephone through the contact us page located on the irs website.


Yes the IRS is supposed to do this but if they do not do it you can use the below information for this purpose.Go to the IRS.gov web site and use the search box for Publication 1450 Instructions on How to Request a Certificate of Release of Federal Tax Lien go to page 2 for the below information.Section 6325(a) of the Internal Revenue Code directs us to release a Federal Tax Lien after a tax liability becomes fully paid or legally unenforceable. We alsomust release a lien when we accept a bond for payment of the tax. If we haven't released the lien within 30 days, you can ask for a Certificate of Release of Federal Tax Lien.Requesting a Copy of the CertificateIf you have paid the tax you owed and have not received a copy of the Certificate of Release of Federal Tax Lien, you may call 1-800-913-6050.If you prefer to write, see page 2 for the address to which your request should be mailed or faxed.Click on the below related link


Usually these are filed with the county court.


No, only the IRS can take that action.


The town or county can file a property tax lien. The state can file a state income tax lien.The town or county can file a property tax lien. The state can file a state income tax lien.The town or county can file a property tax lien. The state can file a state income tax lien.The town or county can file a property tax lien. The state can file a state income tax lien.


It depends on the type of lien. A lien for unpaid property taxes does not expire. A lien for federal income taxes lasts ten years plus a grace period for rerecording. State income tax liens vary in their statutes of limitations.It depends on the type of lien. A lien for unpaid property taxes does not expire. A lien for federal income taxes lasts ten years plus a grace period for rerecording. State income tax liens vary in their statutes of limitations.It depends on the type of lien. A lien for unpaid property taxes does not expire. A lien for federal income taxes lasts ten years plus a grace period for rerecording. State income tax liens vary in their statutes of limitations.It depends on the type of lien. A lien for unpaid property taxes does not expire. A lien for federal income taxes lasts ten years plus a grace period for rerecording. State income tax liens vary in their statutes of limitations.


You must pay within 1 year after the tax lien has been filed. Any violation will lead to a federal transgression.


what is this tax lien for


The statute of limitation for a federal tax lien is 10 years from the assessment date. Various exceptions may extend the time periods so you should obtain legal advice before assuming the lien has become unenforceable.The statute of limitation for a federal tax lien is 10 years from the assessment date. Various exceptions may extend the time periods so you should obtain legal advice before assuming the lien has become unenforceable.The statute of limitation for a federal tax lien is 10 years from the assessment date. Various exceptions may extend the time periods so you should obtain legal advice before assuming the lien has become unenforceable.The statute of limitation for a federal tax lien is 10 years from the assessment date. Various exceptions may extend the time periods so you should obtain legal advice before assuming the lien has become unenforceable.


where do I get a national tax lien directory


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Tax liens whether federal or state always take priority.


Here some info you'll like;IRS will issue a Release of the Notice of Federal Tax Lien: * Within 30 days after you satisfy the tax due (including interest and other additions) by paying the debt or by having it adjusted, or * Within 30 days after we accept a bond that you submit, guaranteeing payment of the debt. In addition, you must pay all fees that a state or other jurisdiction charges to file and release the lien. These fees will be added to the amount you owe. Refer to Publication 1450 (PDF), Request for Release of Federal Tax Lien. Usually 10 years after a tax is assessed, a lien releases automatically if IRS has not filed it again. If they knowingly or negligently do not release a Notice of Federal Tax Lien when it should be released, you may sue the federal government, but not IRS employees, for damages.


A creditor can put a lien on federal income tax refunds and usually will when the debt is that of a student loan or child support. Other creditors can if the right paperwork is filed within a specified time frame to the IRS.


That tax lien would need to be paid



Not necessarily. The old adage of "first in time, first in line" comes into play. To expand, let me explain that, for example, at a real estate closing where both reps of the IRS and State are in attendance, this situation will be discussed by all concerned parties. Usually, it has been predetermined by the attorneys (and tax reps) who is getting what and why. Now, if we are talking about personal property, it doesn't really matter who filed first, but rather who executes first. The existence of a Federal Tax Lien or that of a State tax lien will not prevent either jurisdiction from taking action on personal property. As a matter of fact, the IRS doesn't even need a filed Federal Tax Lien to take action on most personal property, if not all personal property. A Lien arises (non filed) from the mere refusal/inability to pay federal taxes


Here is all the information you need to read for dealing with a Federal Tax Lien http://www.irs.gov/businesses/small/article/0,,id=108339,00.html#appeal Regarding help with the forms, I used these guys cause of the free consultation but I am sure you can shop around: http://www.taxdebtaid.com/tax_lien.html



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