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What is a lolcat?

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2010-06-28 22:00:55
2010-06-28 22:00:55

itz ah pichor or an animal and it has writing on it .. often misspelt ..and makes the picture seem more funny than it is...

nom nom nom ..when a cat is eating....

drugz iz bad .....when a cat has wide eyes or something ...

basicly there there to make you LOL (:

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Your mother is the funniest LOLcat.

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Rickroll and lolcat are examples of acronyms

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LOLCAT is one of the many internet memes, but this one consists of an entirely new language. icanhascheezburger.com is a great website to see many LOLCAT pictures.

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yes...yes i am --- I am too. ------------ me to BOW DOWN TO MY LOLCAT POWA! strange people u r. -jsn.wndsr

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I iz a legendary lolcat...i haz known no bady else who haz born before meh. I think i iz the furst lolcat. And rite now u iz reding wht i haz written. Bye.

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A lolcat is made every time a cat's picture is taken. But you can make one on [/http]www.icanhascheezburger.com[http] i believe that's the URL.

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After a little research I found that lolcat cards are simply funny pictures of cats made to look like a trading card - flickr has a ton listed.

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Usually Impact or Arial Black.

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a whole lotta milk lolcat monkey

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they use there hands, and its scientists what are you some sort of LOLcat.

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read the lolcat bible, and you shall be enlightened. may the light of ceiling cat shine upon you!

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there is a walk-through you just clik it where the play button is.

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She has syphilis.They have syphilis.It has no chance of survival.Dogs typically have tongues.Can I have a cheeseburger?Lolcat can has cheeseburger?

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Now we are just missing a picture of a cute kitten and you'd be a lolcat. how about checking what you write. how many years does you has?

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That is a tough one. On one side we have Roflcopter who is skilled in martial arts, but he's still a 69 year old man. On the other hand we have Lolcat who is 26 but he sings like a little schoolgirl. I would have to go with Roflcopter on this one.

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A lolcat is created when a picture of a cat (usually doing something "cute" or in some sort of action) is fitted with text (usually misspelled in a humorous gesture) to make it appear humorous.Check this site for quite a bit of lolcats: http://icanhascheezburger.com/ or try http://lolcats.com/ but the best website is ucanlol.webs.com/Also, when saying the actual term, be sure to say it like cats, not cats. Just to avoid confusion and embarrassment.

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Lolcats: A study Languages stem from a mother language, in the case of Lolcat, it stemmed from English (which has stemmed from Latin, but that's another story). The culture then creates words for different situations, usually stealing from another culture's language and taking it's funnies for it's own, for a less funny effect. IE: "Im in ur base, fixin ur cumpooters" in which case, the cat is in your base of opporations, fixing your computer. May you have more than one, it's uncertain.

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The internet is a series of tubes transmitting cats. Now, sometimes, these tubes leak and the leaked cats become LOLCats. They are capable of speaking, but usually in impaired english. Some people feel as though they should return them to their native habitat, the internet. They do so by taking pictures of these felines and posting them online. Some LOLCats actually do funny - but suprisingly human - things upon returning to their home. But, sadly, LOLCats aren't everyone's bucket of mustard. They were dark times, son-- Dark times. Some people were not amused by LOLCats' zooming popularity and awesomeness. They attacked these felines-- they deemed them "not funny" and "very stupid"; and, unfortunately for us, they succeeded, growing stronger with every attack. Eventually, few were left, and three of the internet's awesomest people, Notch (creator of minecraft), Philosoraptor, and Captain Falcon had to team up. With Notch's pixelization, Philosoraptor's curiosity, and Captain Falcon's box of strawberry Pop-Tarts, they created....... Nyan Cat. He has the strength of five tigers, the speed of seven cheetahs, and the flavor of a strawberry Pop-Tart. He vanquished these LOLCat haters-- he banished them to the darkest corners of the internet. But just to be safe, he flew across the galaxy, patrolling for any more of these anti-LOLCat scum. To this day, he flies across the galaxy, whilst pooping a rainbow. THE END

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Usually, moon cakes are common - a simple dough filled with various things, including jam; red bean paste; dried lotus seed paste; salted duck egg yolks; jujube (date) paste; seed paste including watermelon seeds, sesame seeds, peanuts, almonds, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, and occasionally winter melon, jinhua ham, or rock sugar; or yam paste. Also, pomelos are eaten - a yellow-green citrus, bigger than a grapefruit, with sweet flesh and a thick spongy rind. The flesh tastes similar to a sweet grapefruit, with a bitter membrane. The spongy rind is not eaten. Some dry the skins and use them for lanterns, while others wear the skin as an improvised hat (see the first LOLcat here: http://smillas.unambitio.us/limecat.jpg I personally think that's a pomelo, even though some say it's a lemon or lime). Other foods are eaten, but ... I don't know them. Hope that helps!

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Oh Hi KittyThis achievement takes a nod to the lolcat meme that has been spreading around in the intenet (hence the name). To unlock this, play a quick match in the frostbite stage. You will notice that by observing the left and right sides of the giant spike-ridden gap in the center of the stage (near the bridges), the "roof" is actually a giant mass of snowy land. Climb up on top of it (you need to position your jump properly) and walk straight to the center of the snow covered platform. From there, simply jump straight up, a hidden jump boost will send you flying into the lolcat image hidden in the stage. Be sure to have plenty of health before doing this and once you climb up, quickly run to the center of the platform as the stage will slowly drain your life. After accomplishing this, you will unlock the lolcats mode.Love is BlindThis trophy can only be unlocked in the tutorial stage of the human campaign. To trigger it, simply play through the stage as you normally would. Once the game reaches the part where it teaches you about jump platforms, do the task and run back to the platform. The sequence where your trainer will point out an incoming missile will begin. At this point, be sure to be standing near the jump boost panel. Wait for the missile to explode then try to go back up to the spawn point. It should be noted that doing this is not as easy as it sounds -the jump boost panel is near your feet, accidentally triggering it will toss you down the stage and unable to unlock the secret unless you retry.After you manage to climb back up, go back to the very first area and you will find that the computers in the background of the stage seems to have been affected by the missile blast -triggering the dancing heart sequence. Doing this will unlock the 4x Health Mode.I Hate NatureTo get this, you must play a quick match in the Facility stage. Head to the lower left part of the stage near the gate where the facility opens up to the underwater area. Here you will find a small group of trees with their branches and leaves reaching all the way up to the roof. In capture the flag and domination matches, a flag or base can be found here. Unlock the achievement by shooting all your ammunition at the leaves above you -this will take some time to accomplish and will consume a good lot of your ammunition so be prepared. Fortunately, there are several weapon spawn points nearby that you can make use off.After shooting enough bullets, the achievement will be awarded and players will unlock the Unlimited Ammo mode.Reach for the SkyLike the love is blind achievement, this one can only be obtained by playing a particular stage. To do this, play the human campaign up to the fourth stage: Cause and Effect. Once you reach this point, head to the extreme left portion of the stage and look for the jump boost pad near the top. Using this boost pad will launch you towards the center of the stage (and you even get an invulnerability power-up on the way too). Once you land, fire a couple of bullets straight up. If the achievement does not unlock at this point, then move a step to the right and keep shooting up - continue the process of stepping right and shooting straight up to finally unlock it.Obtaining reach for the sky will allow players to access the Moon Corpses mode -for those wondering, moon corpses will change the physics of dead players and make their bodies float and stay in the air longer. This is more than just a slight visual tweak, having corpses floating around will affect gameplay as they can still absorb bullets.

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Here's a long list i found:# Afrikaans - haai (hello) pronounced Ha-i# Albanian - tungjatjeta pronounced To-gyat-yeta it means heave a long life or c'kemi (hi)# A'Leamona - tél nìdõ (good day) pronounced tehl-neye-doe# Arabic - subbah-el-kheir (good morning), masaa-el-khair (good evening): note that Kh is pronounced from the back of the throat. mArHAbAn (Hello) pronounced Mar-ha-ban# Armenian - barev or parev# Azerbaijani - salam (hello) pronounced Sa-lam# Bahamas - hello (formal), hi or heyello (informal), what you sayin', Buyh? (very informal - slang)# Basque - kaixo (pronounced Kai-show), egun on (morning; pronounced egg-un own), gau on (night; pronounced gow own)# Bavarian and Austrian German - grüß Gott (pronounced gruess gott), servus (informal; also means "goodbye"; pronounced zair-voos)# Bengali - aas salamu alaay kum (In Botswana Dumeleng [formal]), wareng (Bangladesh [informal]), namaskar (In West Bengal, India)# Bremnian - koali (pronounced kowalee)# Bulgarian - zdravei, zdraveite (to many), zdrasti (informal), Dobro utro (morning), Dobar den (day), Dobar vecher (evening)# Burmese - jacoblarbar# Cambodian - Sour Sdey (informal), Jum Reap Sour (formal), good morning, Arun Sour Sdey, good afternoon Tivea Sour Sdey, good evening Sayoan Sour Sdey, good night Reatrey Sour Sdey, good bye Lea Hoy (informal), Jum Reap Lea (formal)# Cape-Verdean Creole - oi, olá# Catalan - hola (pronounced o-la), bon dia (pronounced bon Dee-ah)good morning, bona tarda (bona tahr-dah) good afternoon, bona nit (bona neet)good night. You can also say just "Bones (bo-nahs) to make it informal.# Chamorro - hafa adai (hello/what's up?), hafa? (informal), howzzit bro/bran/prim/che'lu? (informal), sup (informal)and all other English greetings# Chichewa - moni bambo! (to a male), moni mayi! (to a female)# Chinese - 你好, Cantonese nei ho or lei ho (pronounced nay ho or lay ho) Mandarin 你好 (pronounced ni hao), 早上好(pronounced zao shang hao; good morning!)# Congo - mambo# Cree - Tansi (pronounced Dawnsay)# Croatian - bok (informal), dobro jutro (morning), dobar dan (day), dobra večer (evening), laku noć (night)# Czech - dobré ráno (until about 8 or 9 a.m.), dobrý den (formal), dobrý večer (evening), ahoj (informal; pronounced ahoy)# Danish - hej (informal; pronounced hey), god dag (formal), god aften (evening; formal), hejsa (very informal).# Double Dutch - hutch-e-lul-lul-o (hello), gug-o-o-dud mum-o-rug-nun-i-nun-gug (good morning; formal), gug-o-o-dud a-fuf-tut-e-rug-nun-o-o-nun (good afternoon; formal), gug-o-o-dud e-vuv-e-nun-i-nun-gug (good evening; formal)# Dutch - hoi (very informal), hallo (informal), goedendag (formal)# English - hello (formal), hi (informal), hey (informal,)# Esperanto - saluton (formal), sal (informal)# Estonian - tere'# Egyptian Arabic - Salaam Alekum'(sulam ulakume) (Goodbye) Ma Salaama (ma sulama) the "U" is pronounced its usual way(Example:up)# Fijian - bula uro# Finnish - hyvää päivää (formal), moi or hei (informal), moro (Tamperensis)# French - salut (informal; silent 't'), bonjour (formal, for daytime use; 'n' as a nasal vowel), bonsoir (good evening; 'n' is a nasal vowel), bonne nuit (good night). There is also "ça VA", but this is more often used to mean "how are you?"# Gaelic - dia duit (informal; pronounced gee-ah ditch; literally "God be with you")# Georgian - gamardjoba# German - hallo (informal), Guten Tag (formal; pronounced gootan taag), Tag (very informal; pronounced taack).# Gujarathi - kem che# Greek - yia sou (pronounced yah-soo; informal), yia sas (formal)# Hausa - Ina kwaana? (How did you sleep? - informal) or Ina uni? (how's the day? - informal). Ina kwaanan ku? (formal) or Ina unin Ku (formal)# Hawaiian - aloha# Hebrew - shalom (means "hello", "goodbye" and "peace"), hi (informal), ma kore? (very informal, literally means "whats happening" or "whats up")# Hindi - नमस्ते, namaste (pronounced na-mus-thei)# Hungarian, Magyar - Jo napot (pronounced yoh naput; daytime; formal), szervusz (pronounced sairvoose; informal), szia (pronounced seeya; informal)# Icelandic - góðan dag (formal; pronounced gothan dagg), hæ (informal)# Igbo - nde-ewo (pronounced enday aywo), nna-ewo (pronounced enna wo)# Indonesian - halo (hello), selamat pagi (morning), selamat siang (afternoon), selamat malam (evening)# Italian - ciào (pronounced chow; informal; also means "goodbye"), buon giorno (pronounced bwohn geeornoh; good morning; formal), buon pomeriggio (pronounced bwohn pohmehreejeeoh; good afternoon; formal), buona sera (pronounced bbwoonah sehrah; good evening; formal)# Japanese - おはよう ございます ohayoou gozaimasu (pronounced o-ha-yo (go-zai-mass); good morning), こんにちは konnichi WA (pronounced kong-nee-chee-WA; daytime or afternoon), こんばんは konbanwa (pronounced kong-ban-WA; evening); もし もし moshi moshi (pronounced moh-shee moh-shee; when calling/answering the phone); どうもう doumo (pronounced doh-moh; informal way of thanking/greeting, but means countless other things as well so only use when context makes sense)# Jibberish - huthegelluthego, h-idiguh-el l-idiguh-o (formal), h-diguh-i (informal), h-idiguh-ow a-diguh-re y-idigah-ou? (meaning "how are you?")# Jamaican(slang)- Yow Wah gwaan (pronounced WA-gwaan)# Kanien'kéha (Mohawk) - kwe kwe (pronounced gway gway)# Kannada - namaskara# Kazakh - Salem (hello), Kalay zhagday (How are you?)# Klingon - nuqneH? [nook-neck] (literally: "what do you want?")# Korean - ahn nyeong ha se yo (formal; pronouned ahn-yan-ha-say-yo), ahn nyeong (informal; can also be used to mean "goodbye")# Kurdish - choni, roj bahsh (day; pronounced rohzj bahsh)# Lao - sabaidee (pronounced sa-bai-Dee)# Latin (Classical) - salve (pronounced sal-way; when talking to one person), salvete (pronounced sal-way-tay; when talking to more than one person), ave (pronounced ar-way; when talking to one person; when talking to someone respected), avete (pronounced ar-way-tay; when talking to more than one respected person)# Latvian - labdien, sveiki, chau (informal; pronounced chow).# Lingala - mbote# Lithuanian - laba diena (formal), labas, sveikas (informal; when speaking to a male), sveika (informal; when speaking to a female), sveiki (informal; when speaking to more than one person).# Lojban - coi# Lolcat - Ohai!# Luxembourgish - moïen (pronounced MOY-en)# Malayalam - namaskkaram# Maldivian (Dhivehi) - kihineth (meaning "how" - the common way of greeting)# Maltese - merħba (meaning "welcome"), bonġu (morning), bonswa or il-lejl it-tajjeb (evening)# Maori - kia ora (kia o ra), tena koe, ata Marie, morena (good morning)# Marathi - namaskar# Mongolian - sain baina uu? (pronounced saa-yen baya-nu; formal), sain uu? (pronounced say-noo; informal), ugluunii mend (morning; pronounced ohglohny mend), udriin mend (afternoon, pronounced ohdriin mend), oroin mend (evening; pronounced or-oh-in mend)# Nahuatl - niltze, hao# Navajo - ya'at'eeh# Niuean - faka lofa lahi atu (formal) fakalofa (informal)# Neapolitan - cia, cha# Nepalbhasha - Jwajalapa, ज्वजलपा# Nepali - namaskar, namaste, k cha (informal), kasto cha# Northern German - moin moin# Northern Shoto - dumelang# Norwegian - hei ("hi"), hallo ("hello"), heisann ("hi there"), god morgen ("good morning"), god dag ("good day"), god kveld ("good evening").# Oshikwanyama - WA uhala po, meme? (to a female; response is ee), WA uhala po, tate? (to a male; response is ee) nawa tuu? (response is ee; formal), ongaipi? (meaning "how is it?"; informal)# Oromo(Afan Oromo) - asham (hi')akkam? (how are you?),nagaa (peace, peace be with u)# Persian - salaam or do-rood (see note above - salaam is an abbreviation, the full version being as-salaam-o-aleykum in all Islamic societies)# Pig Latin - eyhay (informal), ellohay (formal), atswhay upay? ("what's up?")# Polish - dzień dobry (formal), witaj (hello) cześć (hi, pronounced, "cheshch")# Portuguese - oi, boas, olá or alô (informal); bom dia or bons dias (good morning, used before noon or before the noon meal); boa tarde or boas tardes (good afternoon, used after noon or after the noon meal, until twilight); boa noite or boas noites (good evening and good night, used after twilight).# Punjabi - sat sri akal# Rajasthani (Marwari)- Ram Ram# Romanian - salut, buna dimineata (formal; morning) buna ziua (formal; daytime) buna searaformal; evening), buna (usually when speaking to a female pronounced boo-nhuh)# Russian - Privet! pronounced as pree-vyet (informal), zdravstvuyte (formal; pronounced ZDRA-stvooy-tyeh)# Samoan - talofa (formal), malo (informal)# Scanian - haja (universal), hallå (informal), go'da (formal), go'maren (morning), go'aften (evening)# Scottish, hi (informal) hello the noo (hello)# Senegal - salamaleikum# Serbian - zdravo, ćao (informal), dobro jutro (morning, pronounced dobro yutro), dobar dan (afternoon), dobro veče (pronounced dobro vetcheah evening), laku noć (night), do viđenja (see you soon)# Sinhala - a`yubowan (pronounced ar-yu-bo-wan; meaning "long live")Kohomada? (ko-ho-ma-da meaning how are you?)# Slovak - dobrý deň (formal), ahoj (pronounced ahoy), čau (pronounced chow) and dobrý (informal abbreviation)# Slovenian - živjo (informal; pronounced zhivyo), dobro jutro (morning), dober dan (afternoon), dober večer (evening; pronounced doh-bear vetch-air)# South African English - hoezit (pronounced howzit; informal)# Spanish - hola (pronounced with a silent 'h': o-la), alo, qué onda (South America;very informal, like "what's up"; pronounced keh ondah), qué hay, (South America; very informal), qué pasa (Spain, informal), buenos días ("good morning"), buenas tardes (afternoon and early evening), buenas noches (late evening and night). These three forms can be made informal by saying "buenas". Also Qué Transa (Mexico;very informal, like "what's up" pronounced keh trahansa). Qué tál, meaning "what's up", pronounced "kay tal".# Sulka - marot (morning; pronounced mah-rote [rolled r and lengthened o], mavlemas (afternoon; v is pronounced as a fricative b), masegin (evening; g is pronounced as a fricative)# Swahili - jambo, Habari (hello), Habari gani (How are you?)# Swedish - tja (very informal; pronounced sha), hej (informal; pronounced hey), god dag (formal)# Swiss German - grüzi (pronounced grew-tsi)# Tagalog (Pilipino - Philippines) - Kumusta po kayo? (formal, means "How are you, sir or madam", pronounced "kuh-muh-stah poh kah-yoh"), Kumusta ka? (informal, means "how are you?", "kuh-muh-stah kah"). You can also add na when talking to someone you haven't see in a while, Kumusta na po kayo? or Kumusta ka na?. Magandang umaga po (Good morning, pronounced "mah-gan-dang oo-mah-gah poh"), Magandang hapon po (Good afternoon, "mah-gan-dang ha-pon poh"), Magandang gabi po (Good evening or night, "mah-gan-dang gah-beh poh"), Magandang tanghali po (good day, literally midday or noon, "mah-gan-dang tang-ha-leh poh"); NOTE: to make these informal greetings, drop po from the end and add the person's first name. Still, some people use words like mare or pare (very informal greeting, mare pronounced "mah-reh" for a close female friend; pare pronounced "pah-reh" for a close male friend). You may add it either before or after the greeting. Example, Mare, kumusta ka na? or Kumusta ka na, pare?# Tahitian - ia orana# Tamil - vanakkam# Telugu- namaskaram# Telugu - baagunnara (means "how are you?"; formal)# Tetum (Timor - Leste) - bondia (morning), botarde (afternoon), bonite (evening)# Thai - sawa Dee-ka (said by a female), sawa Dee-krap (said by a male)# Tongan - malo e lelei# Tshiluba - moyo# Tsonga (South Africa) - minjhani (when greeting adults), kunjhani (when greeting your peer group or your juniors)# Turkish - merhaba selam (formal), selam (Informal)# Ukranian - dobriy ranok (formal; morning), dobriy den (formal; afternoon), dobriy vechir (formal; evening), pryvit (informal)# Uzbek - Assalomu Alaykum (Formal) Salom(Informal) YM# Ung Tongue - Hello (This is a made-up language, like Pig latin. This is pronounced Hung-ee-lung-lung-oh.)# Urdu - adaab ir salam (waley-kum)# Vietnamese - xin chào# Welsh - shwmae (North Wales; pronounced shoe-my)OR Helo# Yiddish - sholem aleikhem (literally "may peace be unto you"), borokhim aboyem or gut morgn (morning), gutn ovnt (evening), gutn tog (day), gut shabbos (only used on the Sabbath)# Zulu - sawubona

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Afrikaans - haai (hello) pronounced Ha-iAlbanian - tungjatjeta pronounced To-gyat-yeta it means heave a long life or c'kemi (hi)A'Leamona - tél nìdõ (good day) pronounced tehl-neye-doeArabic - subbah-el-kheir (good morning), masaa-el-khair (good evening): note that Kh is pronounced from the back of the throat. mArHAbAn (Hello) pronounced Mar-ha-banArmenian - barev or parevAzerbaijani - salam (hello) pronounced Sa-lamBahamas - hello (formal), hi or heyello (informal), what you sayin', Buyh? (very informal - slang)Basque - kaixo (pronounced Kai-show), egun on (morning; pronounced egg-un own), gau on (night; pronounced gow own)Bavarian and Austrian German - grüß Gott (pronounced gruess gott), servus (informal; also means "goodbye"; pronounced zair-voos)Bengali - aas salamu alaay kum (In Botswana Dumeleng [formal]), wareng (Bangladesh [informal]), namaskar (In West Bengal, India)Bremnian - koali (pronounced kowalee)Bulgarian - zdravei, zdraveite (to many), zdrasti (informal), Dobro utro (morning), Dobar den (day), Dobar vecher (evening)Burmese - mingalarbaCambodian - Sour Sdey (informal), Jum Reap Sour (formal), good morning, Arun Sour Sdey, good afternoon Tivea Sour Sdey, good evening Sayoan Sour Sdey, good night Reatrey Sour Sdey, good bye Lea Hoy (informal), Jum Reap Lea (formal)Cape-Verdean Creole - oi, oláCatalan - hola (pronounced o-la), bon dia (pronounced bon Dee-ah)good morning, bona tarda (bona tahr-dah) good afternoon, bona nit (bona neet)good night. You can also say just "Bones (bo-nahs) to make it informal.Chamorro - hafa adai (hello/what's up?), hafa? (informal), howzzit bro/bran/prim/che'lu? (informal), sup (informal)and all other English greetingsChichewa - moni bambo! (to a male), moni mayi! (to a female)Chinese - 你好, Cantonese nei ho or lei ho (pronounced nay ho or lay ho) Mandarin 你好 (pronounced ni hao), 早上好(pronounced zao shang hao; good morning!)Congo - mamboCree - Tansi (pronounced Dawnsay)Croatian - bok (informal), dobro jutro (morning), dobar dan (day), dobra večer (evening), laku noć (night)Czech - dobré ráno (until about 8 or 9 a.m.), dobrý den (formal), dobrý večer (evening), ahoj (informal; pronounced ahoy)Danish - hej (informal; pronounced hey), god dag (formal), god aften (evening; formal), hejsa (very informal).Double Dutch - hutch-e-lul-lul-o (hello), gug-o-o-dud mum-o-rug-nun-i-nun-gug (good morning; formal), gug-o-o-dud a-fuf-tut-e-rug-nun-o-o-nun (good afternoon; formal), gug-o-o-dud e-vuv-e-nun-i-nun-gug (good evening; formal)Dutch - hoi (very informal), hallo (informal), goedendag (formal)English - hello (formal), hi (informal), hey (informal,)Esperanto - saluton (formal), sal (informal)Estonian - tere'Egyptian Arabic - Salaam Alekum'(sulam ulakume) (Goodbye) Ma Salaama (ma sulama) the "U" is pronounced its usual way(Example:up)Fijian - bula uroFinnish - hyvää päivää (formal), moi or hei (informal), moro (Tamperensis)French - salut (informal; silent 't'), bonjour (formal, for daytime use; 'n' as a nasal vowel), bonsoir (good evening; 'n' is a nasal vowel), bonne nuit (good night). There is also "ça VA", but this is more often used to mean "how are you?"Gaelic - dia duit (informal; pronounced gee-ah ditch; literally "God be with you")Georgian - gamardjobaGerman - hallo (informal), Guten Tag (formal; pronounced gootan taag), Tag (very informal; pronounced taack).Gujarathi - kem cheGreek - yia sou (pronounced yah-soo; informal), yia sas (formal)Hausa - Ina kwaana? (How did you sleep? - informal) or Ina uni? (how's the day? - informal). Ina kwaanan ku? (formal) or Ina unin Ku (formal)Hawaiian - alohaHebrew - shalom (means "hello", "goodbye" and "peace"), hi (informal), ma kore? (very informal, literally means "whats happening" or "whats up")Hindi - नमस्ते, namaste (pronounced na-mus-thei)Hungarian, Magyar - Jo napot (pronounced yoh naput; daytime; formal), szervusz (pronounced sairvoose; informal), szia (pronounced seeya; informal)Icelandic - góðan dag (formal; pronounced gothan dagg), hæ (informal)Igbo - nde-ewo (pronounced enday aywo), nna-ewo (pronounced enna wo)Indonesian - halo (hello), selamat pagi (morning), selamat siang (afternoon), selamat malam (evening)Italian - ciào (pronounced chow; informal; also means "goodbye"), buon giorno (pronounced bwohn geeornoh; good morning; formal), buon pomeriggio (pronounced bwohn pohmehreejeeoh; good afternoon; formal), buona sera (pronounced bbwoonah sehrah; good evening; formal)Japanese - おはよう ございます ohayoou gozaimasu (pronounced o-ha-yo (go-zai-mass); good morning), こんにちは konnichi WA (pronounced kong-nee-chee-WA; daytime or afternoon), こんばんは konbanwa (pronounced kong-ban-WA; evening); もし もし moshi moshi (pronounced moh-shee moh-shee; when calling/answering the phone); どうもう doumo (pronounced doh-moh; informal way of thanking/greeting, but means countless other things as well so only use when context makes sense)Jibberish - huthegelluthego, h-idiguh-el l-idiguh-o (formal), h-diguh-i (informal), h-idiguh-ow a-diguh-re y-idigah-ou? (meaning "how are you?")Jamaican(slang)- Yow Wah gwaan (pronounced WA-gwaan)Kanien'kéha (Mohawk) - kwe kwe (pronounced gway gway)Kannada - namaskaraKazakh - Salem (hello), Kalay zhagday (How are you?)Klingon - nuqneH? [nook-neck] (literally: "what do you want?")Korean - ahn nyeong ha se yo (formal; pronouned ahn-yan-ha-say-yo), ahn nyeong (informal; can also be used to mean "goodbye")Kurdish - choni, roj bahsh (day; pronounced rohzj bahsh)Lao - sabaidee (pronounced sa-bai-Dee)Latin (Classical) - salve (pronounced sal-way; when talking to one person), salvete (pronounced sal-way-tay; when talking to more than one person), ave (pronounced ar-way; when talking to one person; when talking to someone respected), avete (pronounced ar-way-tay; when talking to more than one respected person)Latvian - labdien, sveiki, chau (informal; pronounced chow).Lingala - mboteLithuanian - laba diena (formal), labas, sveikas (informal; when speaking to a male), sveika (informal; when speaking to a female), sveiki (informal; when speaking to more than one person).Lojban - coiLolcat - Ohai!Luxembourgish - moïen (pronounced MOY-en)Malayalam - namaskkaramMaldivian (Dhivehi) - kihineth (meaning "how" - the common way of greeting)Maltese - merħba (meaning "welcome"), bonġu (morning), bonswa or il-lejl it-tajjeb (evening)Maori - kia ora (kia o ra), tena koe, ata Marie, morena (good morning)Marathi - namaskarMongolian - sain baina uu? (pronounced saa-yen baya-nu; formal), sain uu? (pronounced say-noo; informal), ugluunii mend (morning; pronounced ohglohny mend), udriin mend (afternoon, pronounced ohdriin mend), oroin mend (evening; pronounced or-oh-in mend)Nahuatl - niltze, haoNavajo - ya'at'eehNiuean - faka lofa lahi atu (formal) fakalofa (informal)Neapolitan - cia, chaNepalbhasha - Jwajalapa, ज्वजलपाNepali - namaskar, namaste, k cha (informal), kasto chaNorthern German - moin moinNorthern Shoto - dumelangNorwegian - hei ("hi"), hallo ("hello"), heisann ("hi there"), god morgen ("good morning"), god dag ("good day"), god kveld ("good evening").Oshikwanyama - WA uhala po, meme? (to a female; response is ee), WA uhala po, tate? (to a male; response is ee) nawa tuu? (response is ee; formal), ongaipi? (meaning "how is it?"; informal)Oromo(Afan Oromo) - asham (hi')akkam? (how are you?),nagaa (peace, peace be with u)Persian - salaam or do-rood (see note above - salaam is an abbreviation, the full version being as-salaam-o-aleykum in all Islamic societies)Pig Latin - eyhay (informal), ellohay (formal), atswhay upay? ("what's up?")Polish - dzień dobry (formal), witaj (hello) cześć (hi, pronounced, "cheshch")Portuguese - oi, boas, olá or alô (informal); bom dia or bons dias (good morning, used before noon or before the noon meal); boa tarde or boas tardes (good afternoon, used after noon or after the noon meal, until twilight); boa noite or boas noites (good evening and good night, used after twilight).Punjabi - sat sri akalRajasthani (Marwari)- Ram RamRomanian - salut, buna dimineata (formal; morning) buna ziua (formal; daytime) buna searaformal; evening), buna (usually when speaking to a female pronounced boo-nhuh)Russian - Privet! pronounced as pree-vyet (informal), zdravstvuyte (formal; pronounced ZDRA-stvooy-tyeh)Samoan - talofa (formal), malo (informal)Scanian - haja (universal), hallå (informal), go'da (formal), go'maren (morning), go'aften (evening)Scottish, hi (informal) hello the noo (hello)Senegal - salamaleikumSerbian - zdravo, ćao (informal), dobro jutro (morning, pronounced dobro yutro), dobar dan (afternoon), dobro veče (pronounced dobro vetcheah evening), laku noć (night), do viđenja (see you soon)Sinhala - a`yubowan (pronounced ar-yu-bo-wan; meaning "long live")Kohomada? (ko-ho-ma-da meaning how are you?)Slovak - dobrý deň (formal), ahoj (pronounced ahoy), čau (pronounced chow) and dobrý (informal abbreviation)Slovenian - živjo (informal; pronounced zhivyo), dobro jutro (morning), dober dan (afternoon), dober večer (evening; pronounced doh-bear vetch-air)South African English - hoezit (pronounced howzit; informal)Spanish - hola (pronounced with a silent 'h': o-la), alo, qué onda (South America;very informal, like "what's up"; pronounced keh ondah), qué hay, (South America; very informal), qué pasa (Spain, informal), buenos días ("good morning"), buenas tardes (afternoon and early evening), buenas noches (late evening and night). These three forms can be made informal by saying "buenas". Also Qué Transa (Mexico;very informal, like "what's up" pronounced keh trahansa). Qué tál, meaning "what's up", pronounced "kay tal".Sulka - marot (morning; pronounced mah-rote [rolled r and lengthened o], mavlemas (afternoon; v is pronounced as a fricative b), masegin (evening; g is pronounced as a fricative)Swahili - jambo, Habari (hello), Habari gani (How are you?)Swedish - tja (very informal; pronounced sha), hej (informal; pronounced hey), god dag (formal)Swiss German - hallo (informal), grüezi (formal, pronounced kind of grew-tsi), grüessech (informal, used in the capital "Berne" pronounced grewe-thech)Tagalog (Pilipino - Philippines) - Kumusta po kayo? (formal, means "How are you, sir or madam", pronounced "kuh-muh-stah poh kah-yoh"), Kumusta ka? (informal, means "how are you?", "kuh-muh-stah kah"). You can also add na when talking to someone you haven't see in a while, Kumusta na po kayo? or Kumusta ka na?. Magandang umaga po (Good morning, pronounced "mah-gan-dang oo-mah-gah poh"), Magandang hapon po (Good afternoon, "mah-gan-dang ha-pon poh"), Magandang gabi po (Good evening or night, "mah-gan-dang gah-beh poh"), Magandang tanghali po (good day, literally midday or noon, "mah-gan-dang tang-ha-leh poh"); NOTE: to make these informal greetings, drop po from the end and add the person's first name. Still, some people use words like mare or pare (very informal greeting, mare pronounced "mah-reh" for a close female friend; pare pronounced "pah-reh" for a close male friend). You may add it either before or after the greeting. Example, Mare, kumusta ka na? or Kumusta ka na, pare?Tahitian - ia oranaTamil - vanakkamTelugu- namaskaramTelugu - baagunnara (means "how are you?"; formal)Tetum (Timor - Leste) - bondia (morning), botarde (afternoon), bonite (evening)Thai - sawa Dee-ka (said by a female), sawa Dee-krap (said by a male)Tongan - malo e leleiTshiluba - moyoTsonga (South Africa) - minjhani (when greeting adults), kunjhani (when greeting your peer group or your juniors)Turkish - merhaba selam (formal), selam (Informal)Ukranian - dobriy ranok (formal; morning), dobriy den (formal; afternoon), dobriy vechir (formal; evening), pryvit (informal)Uzbek - Assalomu Alaykum (Formal) Salom(Informal) YMUng Tongue - Hello (This is a made-up language, like Pig latin. This is pronounced Hung-ee-lung-lung-oh.)Urdu - adaab ir salam (waley-kum)Vietnamese - xin chàoWelsh - shwmae (North Wales; pronounced shoe-my)OR HeloYiddish - sholem aleikhem (literally "may peace be unto you"), borokhim aboyem or gut morgn (morning), gutn ovnt (evening), gutn tog (day), gut shabbos (only used on the Sabbath)Zulu - sawubonaHope this helped :D


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