History, Politics & Society
Roman Empire

What is a province and how was it used in rome?

Answer

Wiki User
05/26/2011

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.

Wiki User
05/26/2011

A Roman province was a territory acquired by Rome either by conquest, treaty or inheritance. This is what made Rome an empire. The provinces were ruled by Roman law under a governor who was usually an ex-consul or ex-praetor. Most of Rome's revenue came from the provinces in the form of taxes, as Roman citizens paid little or no taxes themselves. In addition to being used as a cash cow for Rome, the provines also were trade bases and provided troops for the army. In return the provinces received the benefits of Roman law, and the benefits of Roman engineering, such as roads, aqueducts, baths, etc.