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Answered 2011-05-26 14:11:18

Wire size determines how much current can be safely conducted. Insulation type and rating determines other factors, such as where the wire can be used and maximum voltage.

It should be noted that the high voltage lines that are hanging from the really large electrical towers are among a class of wires that have NO insulation around the outside of the wire. They are instead, connected to the towers with large insulators that prevent electrical energy from being lost through the towers.

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It depends on a lot of factors. Generally speaking, if the insulation is THHN then the rating is 350 amps. If the insulation is THWN then the rating is 310 amps. The ampere rating for wire depends on the temperature of the environment it will be used in, the insulation rating and the number of circuits installed in a conduit. There are also other factors to consider... like voltage drop in long runs.


It is ok to use a fuse with a higher amperage rating and not ok to use a fuse with a smaller amperage rating why?


A #3 copper wire with insulation rating of 90 degrees C has an amperage rating of 105 amps.


20 Amperes per NEC A #12 copper wire, insulation rating of 90 degree C, has an amperage rating of 20 amps.


A #8 copper wire insulation rating of 90 degrees C is rated at 45 amps. At 75 C = 45 amps, at 60 C = 40 amps.


A 500 MCM conductor with an insulation factor of 75 or 90 degrees C is rated at 380 and 430 amps respectively.


What limits the use of a transformer is its operating temperature, as excessively-high temperature will act to break down its insulation. The temperature reached by a transformer is a function of its rating (expressed in volt amperes), so operating a transformer below its rating is perfectly okay.


A 750 MCM aluminum wire with an insulation factor of 75 or 90 degrees C is rated at 385 and 405 amps respectively.


A 750 MCM copper conductor with an insulation factor of 75 and 90 degree C is rated at 475 and 500 amps respectively.


In regards to the capacity of a conductor, the rating is in amperage. Voltage is an insulation factor which refers to the amount of voltage that can be applied to an insulated conductor before the insulation breaks down. A break down of insulation is the main factor of creating a short circuit condition.


The four main conductor insulation rated temperatures that are used in the electrical trade are 60, 75, 90, and 105 degrees C.


Usually the current rating for a circuit is higher than the current usually taken. This leaves a little margin for safety.


The maximum amperage that can be applied to a #14 wire is 15 amps. The 600 volts is just an insulation rating. Check the nameplate on the dryer to see what the amperage and voltage the manufacturer recommends. If the nameplate just states a wattage use the following formula to find the amperage. Amps = Watts/ Volts.


No, a fuse of a higher amperage rating will not usually have a higher melting point link. The higher amperage fuse will use a wider link or a link of larger diameter.


It depends what you mean by a 'high rating'!If you mean a high 'voltage rating' then, yes, you will require thicker insulation. But if you mean a high 'power rating', then, not necessarily, because the voltage can be low, while the current is high.Remember, the thickness of insulation depends on the voltage, while the type of insulation (how it withstands higher temperatures) depends on the current.


V90 is a higher temperature rating than V75. V90 cables can conduct more current without over heating/melting its insulation. V110 is a higher rating than V90.


The amperage rating is dependent upon the insulation rating. A pair of 25mm squared wires touching each other are rated at 131 amps. Three 25mm squared wires touching each other are rated at 110 amps.


This answer is if you are referring to the sizing of electrical conductors in North America using the AWG for sizing. An American Wire Gauge sizing of 600 refers to the cross sectional area of the conductor.This amperage value is for a single copper conductor.A 600 MCM copper conductor with an insulation rating of 75 or 90 degrees C is rated for 690 and 780 amps respectively.This amperage value is for not more than three copper conductors in a conduit or raceway.A 600 MCM copper conductor with an insulation rating of 75 or 90 degrees C is rated for 420 and 475 amps respectively.This amperage value is for a single aluminium conductor.A 600 MCM aluminium conductor with an insulation rating of 75 or 90 degrees C is rated for 545 and 615 amps respectively.This amperage value is for not more than three aluminium conductors in a conduit or raceway.A 600 MCM copper conductor with an insulation rating of 75 or 90 degrees C is rated for 340 and 385 amps respectively.


A #6 AWG copper wire with 60 degree Celsius insulation rating can carry 55 amps, 75 degree Celsius insulation rating can carry 65 amps, and a 90 degree Celsius insulation rating can carry 75 amps. If it is aluminum or copper-clad aluminum the ampacity for the three temperature ratings would be 40, 50, and 60 respectively.


I have never heard of the electrical term intimated conductor. Conductors are rated on their insulation factor. The number that is stamped on the conductor's insulation is the maximum ambient temperature that the conductor can be submitted to. Most home building cables are rated at 75 and 90 degrees C.


Look in your owner's manual or on the fuse panel to see the correct amperage rating for the fuse. The fuse itself will have the amperage rating, but it is possible that someone (at one point in time) put the wrong amperage fuse in, so verify that with the owner's manual or the fuse panel.


A #6 copper conductor with an insulation factor of 75 or 90 degrees C both have an amp rating of 65 amps. If the #6 conductor is connected to a breaker having a 90 degree C rating then the conductor can carry an amperage of 75 amps


A #3 copper wire with an insulation rating of 90 degree C has the capacity to receive 105 amps. This is the most common or standard insulation that most calculations are based on. It is the insulation that governs the rating of the voltage. House wiring cables are insulation rated at 300 volts. Most other wiring insulation is rated at 600 volts. Special wires have a insulation factor of 1000 volts. The higher the insulation temperature factor is the higher the rating of current through the wire becomes. #3 at 60C is 55 amps, at 75C 65 amps, at 90C 105 amps, at 110C 120 amps, at 125C 130 amps, and at 200C 145 amps.


The ambient insulation rating of wires and cables is imprinted on the wire and cables. The labels on the cables will tell you the wire size, number of conductors and temperature rating of the wires and cables. The higher the cable and wire temperature ratings the higher the amount of current that is allowed to be drawn by the wire and cable according to the electrical code book.


5.1v is the Voltage, You need to also look at what the Amperage rating is on the charger. 500ma, 1000ma, etc. How many Milliamps?



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