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Answered 2016-07-20 21:23:32

If you know average speed then you cannot determine the acceleration: the very nature of being a average hides all the increases and decreases in speed which are the accelerations (technically, acceleration is change of speed in a direction).

All average speed tells you is the constant speed at which you require to travel to cover the given distance in the given time; as the speed is constant, the acceleration is zero.

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Answered 2016-07-20 19:04:53

If you know only average speed and time, you don't have enough information.You need to work with VELOCITIES - not with speeds.

And you need to know the DIFFERENCE between the final velocity and the initial velocity. Knowing the average velocity doesn't help (for a given average velocity, the acceleration could be anything).

The calculation is to divide the difference in velocity (i.e., final velocity minus initial velocity) by the time elapsed. That will give you the AVERAGE ACCELERATION.

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Either acceleration, average speed, direction, or instantaneous speed.


Will you settle for average speed ?The general method for solving any problem is to use what you do know in orderto find the answer. Generally, you never use something you don't know, right ?Well, you told us what you don't have, but neglected to mention what you do have.If you know starting and ending speed, then average speed = 1/2 (starting speed + ending speed).If you know distance and acceleration, then time = sqrt( 2 x distance / acceleration).Then you have time and distance, and you can find average speed.



No. For you to know acceleration you need the rate of change of speed and the direction.


Not enough information. You also need to know:* The initial speed * How long it takes to speed up If you divide the difference in speed by the time it takes to speed up, you get the average acceleration for that time period.


If speed does not change, then acceleration is 0 To find acceleration, you must also know the time Speed = metres per second. Acceleration = meters per second, per second Therefore you can use the equation m/s2 to find the acceleration. change in speed/ change in time.


I need to know the answer to this question my science grade depends on it!!!!


The speed or velocity of a train has no bearing on its acceleration.


No and yes. Acceleration is the action of Speeding up while speed is Distance over time. Speed yes. Acceleration. No one would ever know


You have to know how long it takes to get to 90 mph to solve this. Speed = acceleration x time


If you know the initial speed (u), acceleration (a) and time (t), then the final speed, v = u + at.



I'm pretty sure its the acceleration. If its not that, its the Velocity.



Magnitude of average acceleration = (change of speed) divided by (time for the change)Average 'A' = (16 - 6) / 240 seconds = 10/240 = 1/24 meter per second2-- That's the average over the 4 minutes. We don't know anything about thevalue of the acceleration at any particular instant during the 4 minutes..-- We're working entirely with scalars ... speed, not velocity, and magnitude ofacceleration ... since we don't know anything about the car's direction at anypoint in time during the whole event.


Magnitude of average acceleration = (change of speed) divided by (time for the change)Average 'A' = (6 - 4) / 20 = 2/20 = 0.1 meter per second2-- That's the average over the 20 seconds. We don't know anything about thevalue of the acceleration at any particular instant during the 20 seconds.-- We're working entirely with scalars ... speed, not velocity, and magnitude ofacceleration ... since we don't know anything about the runner's direction atany time during the whole event.


Not enough information. You also need to know how much the acceleration is. Once you know that, calculate the final speed, then calculate the average speed as (initial speed + final speed) / 2, and multiply that by the time to get the distance.


well i know that according to you sir it is 33.69 jizeseconds a blipmeter according to science.


Not enough information. If you also know an object's mass, you can use Newton's Second Law to find the acceleration. Then simply multiply acceleration x time to get the speed (assuming that the initial speed is zero).


Magnitude of average acceleration = (change of speed) divided by (time for the change)Average 'A' = (35 - 65) / 10 = -30/10 = -3.5 meters per second2-- That's the average over the 10 seconds. We don't know anything about thevalue of the acceleration at any particular instant during the 10 seconds.-- We're working entirely with scalars ... speed, not velocity, and magnitude ofacceleration ... since we don't know anything about the arrow's direction at anytime during the whole event.


I'm pretty sure it is not possible to find acceleration using mass and distance, however there is another similar equation to find speed using distance and time. speed=distance/time for example: find the average speed of a vehicle that travelled 500m in 30 seconds. speed=d/t. 500m/30s = averages to 17 metres per second therefore the average speed of the vehicle was 17m/s. but in this doesn't answer the rate of deceleration. to find acceleration we must first know the initial speed u and final speed v. so if we assume that the vehicle began the 500m from a stand still then the initial (u) velocity will be 0 and we know its final velocity(v) was 17m/s. so using this equation v=u+at where a is acceleration and t is time we can say 17=0+a*30 or 17=a*30, we can now divide 17 by 30 to end up with a final rate of acceleration. 17/30= 0.6m/s/s this is the acceleration of the vehicle over a 500m distance in 30s.


To know the speed of an object you have to know the distance travelled and the time it took to travel that distance


If the speed is zero at the beginning of the given time ... the object acceleratesfrom rest ... thenDistance (here comes the formula you need to keep for later) = 1/2 a T2Multiply each side of the equation by 2 :2 D = a T2Divide each side by T2 :2D/T2 = aAcceleration = 2 x Distance/Time2And that's the answer to your question "How . . . ".If you ran into this problem on a test and you didn't know that formula up therein the third line, you'd immediately run out of steam and your palms would beginto sweat fiercely.Here's where that formula comes from. If you can get a grip on yourself andthink clearly, here's how to build it whenever you need it:-- You know the Distance the object moved and the Time it took, and you knowthat it started from rest and accelerated uniformly.-- "Acceleration" means how much speed it picks up every second. If it startsfrom zero, then its speed at the end of 'T' is [ a T ].-- The object's average speed during that time is distance/time . . . that's thedefinition of speed.-- The "average" means 1/2 (beginning speed + ending speed). But thebeginning speed was zero, so the average = 1/2 (ending speed).-- Three steps ago: ending speed = a T-- Two steps ago: Average speed = distance/time-- One step ago: Average speed = 1/2 (ending speed) = 1/2 (a T)-- You have two expressions for the average speed, so the expressions are equal:Distance/time = 1/2 (a T)Multiply both sides by the time:Distance = 1/2 a T2And that's the formula up in the third line. The solution for the accelerationcontinues under it.


i dont know but it slithers


To know how fast your going



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