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Answered 2013-02-02 21:27:32

This law hasn't a chemical equation !

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Yes, after the Law of definite proportions; but now it is clear that this law is not applicable to all known chemical compounds.


The three Laws Of Chemical combination are > Law Of Conversation Of Matter > Law Of Definite Composition > Law OF Proportion by.. LaiŽa The three Laws Of Chemical combination are > Law Of Conversation Of Matter > Law Of Definite Composition > Law OF Proportion by.. LaiŽa



The chemical composition of nonstoichiometric compounds do not respect the law of definite proportions.


This law is not valid for all chemical compounds (ex. nonstoichiometric compounds).


A simple definition is: a chemical compond has the elemental components in a fixed ratio.


The law of definite proportions states that a chemical compound always contains exactly the same proportion of elements by mass. An equal statements is the law of constant composition.


As per the law of definite proportions, any mass of a chemical compound always features the same elemental composition. It is also referred to as Proust's Law.



The law of definite composition states that the elements in a given compound are always combined in the same proportion by mass.


The laws governing chemical reactions are laws of nature that are pertinent to chemistry. Three laws governing chemical reactions are the law of conservation of mass, the law of definite composition and the law of multiple proportions.


The law of conservation of matter hasn't a chemical equation.


There are two basic laws of chemical composition. These are The law of Conservation of Mass and The Law of Constant Proportion.



For example the law of definite proportions.


The law of definite composition (proportions) states that the proportions of the elements in a compound are fixed. In other words, water is always H2O and carbon dioxide is always CO2.


In chemistry, the law of definite proportions, sometimes called Proust's Law, states that a chemical compound always contains exactly the same proportion of elements by mass. An equivalent statement is the law of constant composition, which states that all samples of a given chemical compound have the same elemental composition by mass. For example, oxygen makes up about 8/9 of the mass of any sample of pure water, while hydrogen makes up the remaining 1/9 of the mass. Along with the law of multiple proportions, the law of definite proportions forms the basis of stoichiometry.



formation of water and hydrogen peroxide , carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide are the big examples of law of definite proportion


In chemistry, the law of definite proportions and also the elements, sometimes called Proust's Law, states that a chemical compound always contains exactly the same proportion of elements by mass. An equivalent statement is the law of constant composition, which states that all samples of a given chemical compound have the same elemental composition.This observation was first made by the French chemist Joseph Proust based on several experiments conducted between 1798 and 1804. Based on such observations, Proust made statements like this one, in 1806:


Well the difference is, TRIANGLE IS THE ANSWER TO EVERYTHING!


The law of definite proportions states that all chemical compounds have constant proportions of their components.


Joseph Louis Proust (1754-1826), In 1799 Proust stated that "Compounds always contain the same elements in a constant proportion by mass." This statement is now called law of definite composition or the law of constant proportion.


There is no chemical equation for the first law of thermodynamics, which is that energy can be neither created nor destroyed. This is a more general principle than any chemical equation.


"The Law of Definite Composition states that the elements in a given compound are always combined in the same proportion by mass."All of the students in our class had different values for the mass of the hydrate and anhydrous salt, but all calculated the same formula for the hydrate. By everyone calculating the same formula for the hydrate, the law of definite composition was proved.