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Answered 2010-12-18 01:28:07

There is no such thing as an access specifier in Java.

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No, because there is no such thing as an access specifier in Java. There are access modifiers, and security is their entire purpose, so of course you get it when you use them.


Java supports both specifiers and modifiers that can dictate the access.An access specifier that can be applied to any identifier like variables, methods and classes but modifiers cannot be applied to every identifier, there are limitations. For example, the modifiers applied to variables cannot be used with classes and similarly with methods also. Modifiers comes just before the class name.


instance variables:the variables which are declared in class these variables can have access modifiers local variables: the variables which are declared in method these variables should not have access modifiers/specifiers except final answer by divya puvvada


There is no such thing as an access specifier in Java. There are access modifiers.The default access modifier if unspecified is to allow access to classes in the current package only, except within an interface where the default is 'public'.


Java has the same access specifiers as C++ which work in the same way. The only difference is the way in which default access works. In C++, default access is private for class structures and public for struct structures. In Java, default access lies between protected and private, allowing access from the class itself as well as from other classes within the same package, however subclasses have no access unless contained in the same package.


Just googling "java access specifiers" brings up relevant hits. It shouldn't, because there is no such thing. There are access modifiers.This link:http://staff.science.uva.nl/~heck/JAVAcourse/ch4/ss2_2.html(which is wrong because it talks about access specifiers) has a useful table:Summary of Access ModifiersThe following table summarizes the access level permitted by each modifier. Situation public protected default private Accessible to classfrom same package? yes yes yes no Accessible to classfrom different package? yes no, unless it is a subclassno noNote the difference between the default access which is in fact more restricted than the protected access. Without access specifier (the default choice), methods and variables are accessible only within the class that defines them and within classes that are part of the same package. They are not visible to subclasses unless these are in the same package. protected methods and variables are visible to subclasses regardless of which package they are in.


No.In Java, the private access modifier restricts member access to the class in which the member is declared. But in C++, private members are also accessible to friends of the class in which they are declared. The rough equivalent in Java would be package private access.Not that Java doesn't have access specifiers, it has access modifiers. When no modifier is specified, default access is implied, which is package private for classes and public for interfaces.


At the simplest level, a structure is a class where the default access specifier is public, instead of private.Formally, a structure is a class that has no methods, be they constructor, destructor, or otherwise, nor access specifiers. I make this distinction because some C++ compilers do not differentiate, and will allow you to create them, but structures with methods or access specifiers are outside the language definition.


"Inheritance" has nothing to do with "access modifiers". So there is no public inheritance or private inheritance


The different types of access modifiers are:publicprivateprotecteddefault (package)


Three types of access specifier private , public ,protected


There are no access specifiers in C. All functions and data are public.


One of the techniques in object-oriented programming is encapsulation. It concerns the hiding of data in a class and making them available only through its methods. In this way the chance of making accidental mistakes in changing values is minimized. Java allows you to control access to classes, methods, and fields via so-called access modifiers. The access to classes, constructors, methods and fields are regulated using access modifiers i.e. a class can control what information or data can be accessible by other classes. To take advantage of encapsulation, you should minimize access whenever possible.Java provides a number of access modifiers to help you set the level of access you want for classes as well as the fields, methods and constructors in your classes. A member has package or default accessibility when no accessibility modifier is specified.Access Modifiers1. Private2. Protected3. Default4. PublicPublic is the most liberal access modifier and Private is the most restrictive access modifier. NB there is no such thing as an 'access specifier' in Java, only access modifiers.


the access modifiers are private ,public, private..........


Data hiding is the process by which access modifiers are used to hide the visibility of java methods and variables. They access modifiers are: public, private and protected. Abstraction is the process by which we define a specific behavior by beans of abstract classes and methods which form the skeleton for any class that would be extending this class.


They both mean the same. An Access Modifier is a key word in java that determines what level of access or visibility a particular java variable/method or class has. There are 4 basic access modifiers in java. They are: 1. Public 2. Protected 3. Default and 4. Private Private is the most restrictive access modifier whereas public is the least restrictive. Default is the access protection you get when you do not specifically mention an access modifier to be used for a java object. Java programming does not run by just a single piece of class that has the whole functionality. You have hundreds of classes that interact with one another, passing data between them and returning output to the user of the system. So it is very important for members of one class to access members of another. Here members may refer to variables, methods and even classes. So, this is where the access modifiers come into picture. The modifier associated with every member of the class determines what level of visibility that member has.


Visibility is another term used for Acess Specifiers for java variables and objects.One of the techniques in object-oriented programming is encapsulation. It concerns the hiding of data in a class and making them available only through its methods. In this way the chance of making accidental mistakes in changing values is minimized. Java allows you to control access to classes, methods, and fields via so-called access specifiers. The access to classes, constructors, methods and fields are regulated using access modifiers i.e. a class can control what information or data can be accessible by other classes. To take advantage of encapsulation, you should minimize access whenever possible.Java provides a number of access modifiers to help you set the level of access you want for classes as well as the fields, methods and constructors in your classes. A member has package or default accessibility when no accessibility modifier is specified.Access Modifiers1. Private2. Protected3. Default4. PublicPublic is the most liberal access specifier and Private is the most restrictive access specifier.


These are all access modifiers in Java. a. Public - these are accessible anywhere. This is the least restrictive access specifier. b. Private - these are accessible only inside the declaring class. This is the most restrictive access specifier. c. Protected - these are in between public and private. These are accessible to all classes that inherit this class d. Package - this is the default access specifier. These are accessible to all classes that are present in the same package as the contained class.


An Access Modifier is a key word in java that determines what level of access or visibility a particular java variable/method or class has. There are 4 basic access modifiers in java. They are: 1. Public 2. Protected 3. Default and 4. Private Private is the most restrictive access modifier whereas public is the least restrictive. Default is the access protection you get when you do not specifically mention an access modifier to be used for a java object.


An Access Modifier is a key word in java that determines what level of access or visibility a particular java variable/method or class has. There are 4 basic access modifiers in java. They are: 1. Public 2. Protected 3. Default and 4. Private Private is the most restrictive access modifier whereas public is the least restrictive. Default is the access protection you get when you do not specifically mention an access modifier to be used for a java object


An Access Modifier is a key word in java that determines what level of access or visibility a particular java variable/method or class has. There are 4 basic access modifiers in java. They are: 1. Public 2. Protected 3. Default and 4. Private Private is the most restrictive access modifier whereas public is the least restrictive. Default is the access protection you get when you do not specifically mention an access modifier to be used for a java object.


An Access Modifier is a key word in java that determines what level of access or visibility a particular java variable/method or class has. There are 4 basic access modifiers in java. They are: 1. Public 2. Protected 3. Default and 4. Private Private is the most restrictive access modifier whereas public is the least restrictive. Default is the access protection you get when you do not specifically mention an access modifier to be used for a java object.


Access specifiers are public, hidden, and protected (as well as the default access specifier, used when none of these words are used), to specify from where you can have access to a class, or to its members.


public private internal protected internal protected


One of the techniques in object-oriented programming is encapsulation. It concerns the hiding of data in a class and making them available only through its methods. In this way the chance of making accidental mistakes in changing values is minimized. Java allows you to control access to classes, methods, and fields via so-called access specifiers. The access to classes, constructors, methods and fields are regulated using access modifiers i.e. a class can control what information or data can be accessible by other classes. To take advantage of encapsulation, you should minimize access whenever possible. Java provides a number of access modifiers to help you set the level of access you want for classes as well as the fields, methods and constructors in your classes. A member has package or default accessibility when no accessibility modifier is specified. Access Modifiers in Java: 1. Private 2. Protected 3. Default 4. Public



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