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2010-08-06 18:16:06
2010-08-06 18:16:06

The Second Law of Thermodynamics.

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Entropy, i.e. the second law of thermodynamics.


They don't. What they do support is that the Universe must have had a beginning. This is because, according to the Second Law of Thermodynamics, there are irreversible processes in nature - the Universe can't remain the way it is forever.


The First Law is Conservation of Energy (stated in the language of Thermodynamics). Energy can neither be created nor destroyed. The Second Law has many formulations; one of them is that entropy increases. Another is that there are irreversible processes in the Universe - irreversible in the sense of energy processes. In other words, useful energy is constantly being converted into unusable energy.



Every reaction in the universe increases the disorder, or entropy, of the universe. This is because energy that goes into a reaction is usable energy, but after the reaction, the energy is not usable anymore.


The Second Law of Thermodynamics means that useful energy is continuously converted into useless energy. In other words, there are irreversible processes in the Universe. One important implication is that the Universe can't have existed forever, nor can it sustain life forever in the future.


Wasted energy will increase the amount of useless, or unusable, energy, and reduce the amount of usable energy in the Universe. The wasted energy is related to entropy - one way to express the Second Law of Thermodynamics is to say that there are irreversible processes (in terms of energy), another is that "entropy increases". However, entropy is not energy; it is not measured in Joule, but in Joule/Kelvin. In any case, you might say that when energy is wasted, entropy increases.Wasted energy will increase the amount of useless, or unusable, energy, and reduce the amount of usable energy in the Universe. The wasted energy is related to entropy - one way to express the Second Law of Thermodynamics is to say that there are irreversible processes (in terms of energy), another is that "entropy increases". However, entropy is not energy; it is not measured in Joule, but in Joule/Kelvin. In any case, you might say that when energy is wasted, entropy increases.Wasted energy will increase the amount of useless, or unusable, energy, and reduce the amount of usable energy in the Universe. The wasted energy is related to entropy - one way to express the Second Law of Thermodynamics is to say that there are irreversible processes (in terms of energy), another is that "entropy increases". However, entropy is not energy; it is not measured in Joule, but in Joule/Kelvin. In any case, you might say that when energy is wasted, entropy increases.Wasted energy will increase the amount of useless, or unusable, energy, and reduce the amount of usable energy in the Universe. The wasted energy is related to entropy - one way to express the Second Law of Thermodynamics is to say that there are irreversible processes (in terms of energy), another is that "entropy increases". However, entropy is not energy; it is not measured in Joule, but in Joule/Kelvin. In any case, you might say that when energy is wasted, entropy increases.


First Law of Thermodynamics is also known as Conservation of Energy. Second Law of Thermodynamics means that useful energy is continuously being converted into unusable energy - there are irreversible processes in our Universe, with respect to energy. Read the Wikipedia articles for a more thorough discussion.


The first law of thermodynamics is often called the ''Law of Conservation of Energy''. This law suggests that energy. can be transferred from one system to another in many forms. Also, it can not be ''created'' or ''destroyed''. Thus, the total amount of energy available in the Universe is constant.Second Law of ThermodynamicsAs a result of this fact of thermodynamics, natural processes that involve energy transfer must have one direction, and all natural processes are irreversible. This law also predicts that the entropy of an isolated system always increases with time. Entropy is the measure of the disorder or randomness of energy and matter in a system.Third Law of ThermodynamicsThe third law of thermodynamics states that if all the thermal motion of molecules kinetic energy could be removed, a state called absolute zero would occur. Absolute zero results in a temperature of 0 Kelvins or -273.15° Celsius


The second law captures the observations that natural changes always result in an increase in the entropy of the universe.


That would be the implication of the second law of thermodynamics.


It is expressed in several ways which happen to be equivalent; for example, that entropy in an "isolated system" can increase but not decrease, and that there are processes in the Universe that are irreversible (with respect to energy).


Whatever the "end of the Universe" is, that doesn't seem likely. You don't even need to know exactly how the Universe will end. In any case, there are lots of irreversible processes - to read more about this topic, read the Wikipedia article, or perhaps some other sources, on "Second Law of Thermodynamics". There is no known way to revert such processes; there probably never will be.


No. What is killing the Universe is the Second Law of Thermodynamics.


The entropy of the universe is increasing


The Universe is continuously expanding. The distance between galaxies increases. The amount of space in the Universe increases.



The Second Law of Thermodynamics applies to all processes in our Universe. It is not restricted specifically to food. In any process, the amount of unusable energy will increase. In extreme cases it might remain unchanged, but this is rather unlikely, since this implies 100% efficiency.


Because of entropy. The Second Law of Thermodynamics postulates that there is a physical quantity called entropy that increases in all processes irreversibly. Physicists identify entropy as a measure of the disorder or complexity of a system. (The First Law of Thermodynamics states that the amount of energy in the universe is constant; energy cannot be created or destroyed but can be transformed from one form to another.) Thus, if we ask: What was the entropy of the universe yesterday compared with today's and tomorrow's? The answer is: Yesterday, entropy was less than today; tomorrow, it will be greater than today. As time flows from past to future, entropy always increases in the same direction, irreversibly. So there is a distinction between past, present, and future; changes do occur through the passage of time and the Second Law provides a measure of these changes through the concept of entropy. Stated differently, today's world looks different to us from yesterday's because of all the increases in entropy due to the processes, transformations, events and happenings since then. From: Time Travel: Possible, or Impossible? by Jack Hokikian, Ph.D. http://www.losfelizpublishing.com/Time%20Travel.htm


No - living systems release heat to their surroundings as they undergo their organizing processes so although they may become more organized locally, the entropy of the universe is still increasing.


Entropy has to do with everything. The Laws of thermodynamics govern everything in the known universe.


The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that the state of entropy of the entire universe, as an isolated system, will always increase over time. The second law also states that the changes in the entropy in the universe can never be negative.


this increase in organization over time in no way violates the second law. The entropy of a particular system, such as an organism, may actually decrease, so long as the total entropy of the universe-the system plus its surroundings-increases. Thus, organisms are islands of low entropy in an increasingly random universe. The evolution of biological order is perfectly consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.


The total energy of the universe is constant. It can change form but it will never increase nor decrease.


It forbids heat to move from a cold region to a hot regions spontaneously (you have to "pump" it there - meaning you have to do work to get it to move that direction). Alternatively - it forbids any natural/spontaneous process to DECREASE the entropy of the universe.



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