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What liquids are less dense than water?

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2008-03-23 09:50:40
2008-03-23 09:50:40

Some of the liquids that are less dense than water ( that I know of) include oil, alcohol and Hexane(:

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No, for example, ice is less dense than liquid water, which is why it floats.


Of course there may be individual differences, but in general, gases are less dense than liquids.Of course there may be individual differences, but in general, gases are less dense than liquids.Of course there may be individual differences, but in general, gases are less dense than liquids.Of course there may be individual differences, but in general, gases are less dense than liquids.


No. Several liquids, including gasoline, oil and alcohol, are less dense.


some solids are more dense than liquids (they sink) but others are less dense which is why not all solids sink


No. Gases are less dense than their corresponding liquids.


Kerosene and turpentine are less dense than engine oil. So is water and rubbing alcohol and other common liquids.


That depends on the specific situation. Assuming the liquids just mix, and don't have some other reaction: * Adding water to a liquid that is denser than water will result in a liquid that is less dense (than the liquid that is not water). * Adding water to a liquid that is less dense than water will result in a liquid that is more dense.


Yes. Not on air, but on top of others. Low viscosity liquids, such as oil, can float on water because they are less dense than water.



Playdoh can float depending on how dense it is. It also depends on what your floating it on. If you float it on water than it has to be less dense than the water, same with other liquids.


If you are asking if a solid is more dense than a liquid, the answer is ... you cannot tell for sure. Some liquids are more dense than some solids (mercury is more dense than paper), and some liquids are less dense than solids (alcohol is less dense than lead).


Water does because the water is less dense than other liquids like soda.


yes, gases are less dense than liquids and solids because the mass of gas particles can be neglected according to liquids and solids according to gaseous theory


There are many liquids more dense than water. The most commonly thought of is probably Mercury.


yes it is a cork is less dense than water


A wooden block can be less dense than water.


water is less dense man


Yes. liquids are less dense than solids because the particles in a liquid have more energy than those in a solid, so they have more space in between them.


Helium is a gas and water is a liquid. Helium is much less dense than water.


Oil is less dense than water. That is why oil floats on water.


Any liquid that is less dense than water will float on top of it. For example, oil or gas .


Sodium is slightly less dense than water.


Oil IS already less dense than water.


Yes, argon is much less dense than water.


Yes, there are many. For example, anything that floats on water is less dense than liquid water. A number of solids are less dense than liquids. The most common example is ice. Ice (frozen water) is less dense than its liquid counterpart for some very specific reasons. Many other solids are less dense than liquids, as well. Using water as the liquid, you'll find that cork, wood (most kinds) and styrofoam will all float on it. As the liquid becomes more dense, the range of items that will float on it increases. Mercury, for example, is a liquid metal at room temperature. Because it is so dense, many things will float on it. Lead is one example of something that will float on liquid mercury. For a question about substances that are less dense in their solid form than those same substances in their liquid form, use the link below to the related question.



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