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Kid Rock

What percentage of homeschooled kids go to college?

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July 17, 2015 5:46PM

College Bound Homeshoolers

There are a few problems to answering your question - one is the fact that no one actually knows how many homeschoolers are out there. There are estimates ranging between 1 and 2 million, but these are estimates only.

Another problem is the fact that no one actually knows how many college students were homeschooled. Many homeschoolers attend some High school to have transcripts and avoid questions. Others list their home school as a private school - actually they are forced to be listed as private schools in many states by law. Still others attend Junior college concurrently with homeschooling - just as some state funded highschoolers do. This gives them college transcripts. Many Universities will take college transcripts without asking for high school transcripts if they have enough (often equivalent to a year's worth or even a semester's in some cases).

A third problem is there is a small (but growing) segment within homeschoolers that homeschool college.

A fairer question would be "what percentage of homeschoolers who apply to a college are accepted"?

As I understand it. In many schools including Ivy League Universities, Homeschoolers are actually more likely to be accepted than Public Schoolers. They tend to have higher test scores, they tend to have more extracurricular activities, and finally, they tend to have fewer problems with transcripts :)

Here is more input from Wiki s contributors:

  • I can only answer from our experience. Our son was homeschooled until High School. He was a year ahead of his age and continued that way through H.S. He is now in college with a 3.9 GPA.
  • I am from Oklahoma and was homeschooled from Kindergarten through Highschool. I am now 20 credits away from receiving my Associates degree. My brother applied to the OU and when he told them that he was homeschooled, they said "We find that homeschoolers do better in college courses. In fact, 30% of our applicants are homeschoolers." Administrations went on to say that they are more inclined to accept homseschoolers.
  • A relatively high percentage of home schoolers attend college when compared with the total High School Population. When compared with traditional schools academic honors classes, however, the comparison is significantly less. About 60% of home schoolers go to college when over 90% of honors graduates go to college.
  • This seems like a closer 1:1 comparison when you consider that "honors" classes in the modern venacular simply refers to students that are not in remedial classes and parents are at least moderately involved.
  • [I would like to say to the person above, "honors" may mean just that in a public school in middle America, however in private schools on the east coast honors means the same thing as ap in most mid. American high schools.]
  • Although most institutions agree that home schoolers are academically prepared for college level work, those in higher education seem to also agree that home schoolers are less likely to adapt to the structure of higher education which could explain the lower attendance level.
  • Of course, this is just an assumption that they are making, for almost no research has been done on homeschoolers. A previous version of this answer said that sending kids to high school and getting involved with them is the best way to guarantee their success in college. That statement is incorrect. Statistically, it seems to be the best way to guarantee that they will go to college. Attendance and success are far from the same thing.
  • Until more research is done into this topic, the success issue will have to remain an open question.