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Answered 2015-03-05 13:43:40

Stars cannot fuse any other elements heavier than iron simply for the fact that it does not produce energy. However, what comes next mainly depends on how much mass is contained within the star itself. If the mass of the star is 1.4 times the size of our sun, the electron degeneracy pressure (what holds up the dying star. the lower limit to size--electrons in star are squeezed together so tightly, further contraction is impossible) cannot hold the star, so the electrons are "squeezed" together, creating neutrons. The star will shrink until neutrons are packed as close together as possible and a neutron is the result. Neutron stars do not glow like white dwarfs but can be detected.

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Answered 2020-06-12 01:46:39

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Nuclear fusion affects stellar evolution by essentially halting all mitosis and miosis that any cells in a stellar evolution could experience, and they stunt the growth of the object.


This is caused by fusion of light elements in stars, which releases heat.


In G-type stars, this would be the white dwarf stage. More massive stars could continue to fuse ever heavier elements, until the fusion products consist mainly of iron, and the stellar core collapses into a neutron star or a black hole.


Yes. Animals are composed of chemicals. Chemical evolution typically refers to stellar nucleosynthesis, the creation of elements by nuclear fusion in the cores of stars, and the synthesis of elements heavier than iron via star bursts--supernova. Biochemical evolution would refer to the formation of more complex molecules, such as the spontaneous generation of amino acids from less complex molecular arrangements.


The process is called stellar nucleosynthesis and is based on nuclear fusion reactions.


"Stellar" means "related to a star", so you can use it in expressions such as "stellar wind", "stellar atmosphere", "stellar fusion", etc.


Energy is liberated through fusion reactions, producing heavier and heavier elements. There are two transient elements heavier than iron which are produced by standard stellar nucleosynthesis, but these are short lived and decay into lighter elements. Iron is the heaviest element forged in the heart of a star via standard stellar evolution. All elements heavier than iron are the byproduct of a supernova, wherein atomic nuclei are smashed together with such force energy is consumed in the nuclear reaction. This is why there tends to be an abundance of stable isotopes as light as iron, but elements heavier than iron are much more rare. Lead is an exception to this general rule as it is the end product of a long radioisotope decay sequence.


No Atoms do not grow.I stellar explosions atoms of heavier elements are formed by thermodynamic fusion processes from lighter elements.We are all made of star dust!


The accepted modern theory of elemental formation states: The lighter elements are a bi-product of nuclear fusion from stellar masses (stars).


Nuclear physics. As a star ages, the fusion of lighter elements into heavier elements changes the composition of the star's core, which in turn affects the dynamics of its interior. Convection patterns change, the core's energy production changes, and so on. This ultimately affects the way a star looks in our telescopes.


All stars "burn" by the process of nuclear fusion. When fusion has been completed, the star dies. That can occur in several different ways and the interested party could look into the topic of stellar evolution. Neutron stars, black holes and white dwarfs are examples of end stages of stellar evolution. Some stars never really reach the stage of fusion and such large objects are called brown dwarfs. If Jupiter were not a planet, it might be deemed a brown dwarf.


The chemical elements (excepting hydrogen and helium, possible also beryllium and lithium and of course the tranuranium elements) are formed by stellar nucleosynthesis followed by helium fusion.


In the most common stellar fusion, helium gas is formed from the fusion of hydrogen nuclei.


No - only MOST elements. The first element to form right after the Big Bang was hydrogen; all others formed from hydrogen, through nuclear fusion - some helium in the first minutes of the Big Bang, and heavier elements later, in stars.


Our sun produces mostly helium by fusion, but it also uses fusion to make lithium, beryllium and boron. Temperature and mass determine how far a star can go with fusion. "Solar fusion" only refers to the fusion going on in Sol, the star nearest Earth (our star, the sun). Stellar nucleosynthesis is how elements are produced in stars, and in much larger & hotter stars fusion is responsible for elements as heavy as unstable zinc, or stable iron.


Our sun produces mostly helium by fusion, but it also uses fusion to make lithium, beryllium and boron. Temperature and mass determine how far a star can go with fusion. "Solar fusion" only refers to the fusion going on in Sol, the star nearest Earth (our star, the sun). Stellar nucleosynthesis is how elements are produced in stars, and in much larger & hotter stars fusion is responsible for elements as heavy as unstable zinc, or stable iron.


That depends on the temperature and pressure. Under different conditions different elements can fuse, starting at the lowest temperature and pressure deuterium and tritium fuse to make helium. In the end at the highest temperature and pressure a variety of reactants fuse to produce a mixture of nickel and iron, then fusion stops. The full list of fusion reaction equations is several hundred equations long and is best found in a book on stellar evolution.


No. Fusion has long since ceased by the time a stellar remnant becomes a black dwarf.


Elements heavier than iron are formed through the fusion reaction in stars when a supernova occurs. The lighter elements up through iron are formed in "regular" stellar fusion, and this is what powers most stars throughout their lives. A lot of energy is created in the fusion reactions, and this is why stars "burn" the way they do. But after iron, fusion switches from exothermic to endothermic. That means energy must be put into the fusion reaction to create these heavier elements, and only when a super abundance of energy is available, like during the collapse of a star in a supernova, is there sufficient energy to drive those fusion reactions. All the trans-iron elements up through uranium are created in the supernova.


Stellar nucleosynthesis is the process by which stars operate. Stars are massive nuclear fusion engines, and they consume hydrogen, the most abundant element in the universe, and fuse it into helium. They do this throughout most of their lives, and then fuse helium and heavier nuclei to make heavier elements up through iron later in their lives. Stellar nucleosynthesis is the basic "life story" of stars. But what about those elements heavier than iron?All the trans-iron elements are formed in a supernova event because those heavier-than-iron elements do not liberate energy when being fused. It takes energy to make them happen, unlike the fusion processes that create elements up through iron. The endothermic fusion reactions that create the heavier elements are only possible when the star collapses after exhausting its fuel, and the collapse compresses and heats the material and provides enough energy for the fusion of the heavy elements. A big explosion follows, as you know. And only stars moderately large (a bit bigger than our sun) have sufficient mass to go supernova and create these heavy elements. You'll find links below for more information.Star fusion is where a star heats up to cause the atoms the smash into each other creating a new mineral which with have a smaller mass that the first. the excess mass is just PURE ENERGY.


It is stellar nucleosynthesis that forms elements inside stars. Most stars are giant nuclear fusion machines. They make heavy elements by fusing ligher elements together. This creates all elements up through iron. Elements heavier than iron cannot form in stellar nucleosynthesis. That's because more energy is required to fuse heavier elements together to create the really heavy elements than is liberated in that kind of fusion. The only way these heavier elements can form is when a star dies in a super nova. It is this massive "last gasp" that allows the crushing pressures (and high temperatues) needed to make the trans-iron elements. So all elements heavier than iron were made in super novae.


The sun produces its thermal energy through nuclear fusion. Gravity forces the stellar matter into a smaller and smaller sphere until the pressures and temperatures at the center of the stellar mass becomes so hot that the star's center supports sustained nuclear fusion reactions, usually combining Hydrogen into Helium. Larger stars go on to combine Helium into Carbon, Carbon into Nitrogen, Nitrogen into Oxygen, Oxygen into Fluorine, and so on. . In stellar nuclear fusion, the sum of the mass of the elements before the fusion reaction occurs is larger than the sum of the mass of the product elements. This means that some mass has been lost in the process. This "lost" matter has not actually been lost, but has been converted into electromagnetic energy. It is this fusion-driven matter-to-energy conversion process that causes the sun to produce energy.


The Big Bang created over 99.9% of the atoms in the current universe, but these are limited to Hydrogen and a little bit of Helium.Stellar fusion created most of the Helium and the elements from Lithium through Nickel and Iron.Supernova explosions created all the rest of the elements, including quite a few transuranic elements.


Main Sequence - star is stable because of Hydrostatic Equilibrium. Fusing Hydrogen to Helium in core. Stars spends about 90% lifetime as main sequence.This is were I found the answer - http://www.maa.mhn.de/Scholar/star_evol.html