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The world has seen many wars, but the two world wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating.
Now, break it down: You have two clauses here joined by a conjunction. (1) The world has seen many wars... (2) ...the two wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating. And, the conjunction "but." (I added the comma above for grammatical accuracy.)
There is no prepositional phrase in the first clause; you have a simple subject, predicate, object construction.
The second clause contains the prepositional phrase. Easiest way to find it is to identify the part of speech of each word:There are eleven:

  1. the
  2. two
  3. wars
  4. in
  5. the
  6. twentieth
  7. century
  8. have
  9. been
  10. particularly
  11. devastating

There are two definite articles, both "the." So cross off #'s 1 and 5. Number 2, "two," is an adjective here modifying the noun after it "wars," so check off #'s 2 and 3. Number 4, "in" is a preposition...Oh! there's your first hint: prepositional phrases begin with a preposition. A prepositional phrase is a phrase consisting of a preposition, its object, which is usually a noun or a pronoun, and any modifiers of the object. So, we need to look for those components. Typically, the prepositional phrase follows immediately after the preposition. Here we have "in the twentieth century. We know that "in" is the preposition, "the twentieth century" then becomes the object, "the" and "twentieth' modifying "century."

Let's keep looking though: "have," modal verb; "been," past tense verb, form of to be; "particularly," adjective, modifies "devastating;" "devastating," adjective, modifies "wars."

So, there you have it. The prepositional phrase and a way to find it.
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Denis Block

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Q: What the prepositional phrase in this sentence The world has seen many wars but the two world wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating?
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What is the prepositional phrase in this sentence The world has seen many wars but the two world wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating?

Let's work this out together:The world has seen many wars, but the two world wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating.Now, break it down: You have two clauses here joined by a conjunction. (1) The world has seen many wars... (2) ...the two wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating. And, the conjunction "but." (I added the comma above for grammatical accuracy.)There is no prepositional phrase in the first clause; you have a simple subject, predicate, object construction.The second clause contains the prepositional phrase. Easiest way to find it is to identify the part of speech of each word:There are eleven:thetwowarsinthetwentiethcenturyhavebeenparticularlydevastatingThere are two definite articles, both "the." So cross off #'s 1 and 5. Number 2, "two," is an adjective here modifying the noun after it "wars," so check off #'s 2 and 3. Number 4, "in" is a preposition...Oh! there's your first hint: prepositional phrases begin with a preposition. A prepositional phrase is a phrase consisting of a preposition, its object, which is usually a noun or a pronoun, and any modifiers of the object. So, we need to look for those components. Typically, the prepositional phrase follows immediately after the preposition. Here we have "in the twentieth century. We know that "in" is the preposition, "the twentieth century" then becomes the object, "the" and "twentieth' modifying "century."Let's keep looking though: "have," modal verb; "been," past tense verb, form of to be; "particularly," adjective, modifies "devastating;" "devastating," adjective, modifies "wars."So, there you have it. The prepositional phrase and a way to find it.


What is the prepositional phrase in this sentence The world has seen many wars but the two world wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating.?

Let's work this out together:The world has seen many wars, but the two world wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating.Now, break it down: You have two clauses here joined by a conjunction. (1) The world has seen many wars... (2) ...the two wars in the twentieth century have been particularly devastating. And, the conjunction "but." (I added the comma above for grammatical accuracy.)There is no prepositional phrase in the first clause; you have a simple subject, predicate, object construction.The second clause contains the prepositional phrase. Easiest way to find it is to identify the part of speech of each word:There are eleven:thetwowarsinthetwentiethcenturyhavebeenparticularlydevastatingThere are two definite articles, both "the." So cross off #'s 1 and 5. Number 2, "two," is an adjective here modifying the noun after it "wars," so check off #'s 2 and 3. Number 4, "in" is a preposition...Oh! there's your first hint: prepositional phrases begin with a preposition. A prepositional phrase is a phrase consisting of a preposition, its object, which is usually a noun or a pronoun, and any modifiers of the object. So, we need to look for those components. Typically, the prepositional phrase follows immediately after the preposition. Here we have "in the twentieth century. We know that "in" is the preposition, "the twentieth century" then becomes the object, "the" and "twentieth' modifying "century."Let's keep looking though: "have," modal verb; "been," past tense verb, form of to be; "particularly," adjective, modifies "devastating;" "devastating," adjective, modifies "wars."So, there you have it. The prepositional phrase and a way to find it.


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