Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Includes questions related to the comprehension, usage and identification of the parts of speech that combine with nouns and prounouns to form prepositional phrases, that connect words, phrases and terms and that are used to express emotion such as Yuck! or Wow!

8,301 Questions
Definitions
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

What is a conjunction?

A conjunction is any conjoining, connecting artifact, or can be the union formed by a joining or combining.

Astronomy - any apparent close approach of objects in the sky

Logic - A conjunction is a compound proposition that is true if-and-only-if all of its component propositions are true. It can also be the relationship among the components of such a proposition, usually expressed by AND or &/or.

Part of Speech - A conjunction is a word that links words, phrases, or clauses together. You would use it when you were writing a story or report. To remember all of the coordinating conjunctions, just remember FANBOYS [for, and, nor, but, or, yet, so]

Conjunctions can be any member of a small class of words distinguished in many languages by their function as connectors between words, phrases, clauses, or sentences (e.g. as, and, because, but, however) or can be any other word or expression that performs a similar function.

Conjunctions are traditionally categorized into several types: coordinating conjunctions, subordinating conjunctions and correlative conjunctions. Some examples of each follow.

* Co-ordinating conjunctions: and, or, nor, for, but, yet, so

* Subordinating conjunctions:because, since, while, before, after, unless

* Correlative conjunctions: if...then / either...or / neither...nor / both...and / whether...or /not only...but...also/ as...as

The coordinating conjunctions can be used to link sentences together where neither is subordinate to the other. Subordinating conjunctions introduce subordinate clauses. Correlative conjunctions come in pairs that must appear together in the same sentence.

Some conjunctions can also link phrases that are smaller than whole sentences. For example, the coordinating conjunctions and and or can be used to link almost any phrases so long as they are of the same type:

  • nouns: I like [cats] and/or [dogs].
  • noun phrases: I like [this cat] and/or [that dog]
  • verbs: The cat [scratched] and/or [bit] the dog.
  • verb phrases: The cat [scratched the dog] and/or [bit the mouse].
  • prepositions: The cat climbed [up] and/or [down] the tree.
  • preposition phrases: The cat climbed [up the tree] and/or [down the wall].
  • adjectives: I like very [energetic] and/or [playful] cats.
  • adjective phrases: I like [very energetic] and/or [extremely playful] cats.
  • adverbs: It climbed very [energetically] and/or [playfully].
  • adverb phrases: It climbed [very energetically] and/or [extremely playfully].
  • sentences: [The cat climbed up the tree] and/or [the dog barked].

A conjunction connects words, phrases and clauses. The 3 types of conjunctions are coordinating, subordinating, and correlative. Coordinating are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. Subordinating conjunctions include as, since, if, although, and because. And correlative conjunctions come in pairs: either/or, neither/nor..

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Area
Adjectives and Articles
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Nouns

What are 100 acres called?

hectare

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Sentence and Word Structure
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

What follows a preposition?

The preposition is followed by its object (and words that modify the object in the prepositional phrase).

A preposition is a word that occurs before a noun/pronoun in a clause. "Preposition" means, pre - before and position - the object's location. Hence, the word that follows a preposition should be a noun or a pronoun.

Some examples are as under:

  • The book is on the table (on- preposition; table-noun)
  • He is standing beneath the tree (beneath-preposition; tree-noun)

The object of a preposition is a word or phrase that the preposition refers to.

For example, in the sentence "Mary hid under the table", the word "under" is a preposition, and "the table" is its object.

The object of a preposition usually comes immediately after the preposition, but it may come before it. Compare these two sentences:

In whose name shall I book the table?

Whose name shall I book the table in?

In both sentences, the preposition is "in" and its object is "whose name" (the second form is referred to as a dangling preposition and is normally avoided).

Object of a preposition

There are five structures that can follow a preposition.

NOUN PHRASE She is interested in the book.

PRONOUN She is interested in it.

GERUND She is interested in doing it.

NOUN CLAUSE She is interested in what you said.

RELATIVE CLAUSE This is the house in which she lives.*

* This is only true in formal English.
In a sentence, a noun or pronoun typically follows a preposition.

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Adjectives and Articles
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Nouns

Is the word under a noun or adjective?

The word under is a preposition, an adjective, or an adverb. Example uses:

Preposition: I would be concerned under those circumstances.

Adjective: You will want to wear an under skirt with that dress.

Adverb: We finally found Junior hiding under the coats on the bed.

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Is passed experience correct usage?

No, it should be past experience

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Parts of Speech
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Is cool an interjection?

I think it could be considered an interjection if used in a way to show emotion.

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Adjectives and Articles

What kinds of telemarketing are there?

There are two types of telemarketing: outbound and inbound. Outbound telemarketing calls are those placed by salespeople to homes or businesses. Inbound telemarketing occurs when customers call in to businesses to place orders.

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Literature and Language
Synonyms and Antonyms
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Are Interjections and exclamations synonyms?

Essentially interjections and exclamations are the same thing. They are both parts of speech that exemplify some type of sudden emotion. Interjections are typically only a word or two long, while exclamations can be a sentence; basically, an interjection is simply a subcategory of exclamations.

Some common interjections/exclamations include alas, oh (dear/boy/my), uh, well, no duh, and so on.

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Grammar
Sentence and Word Structure
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

What is the punctuation rule for when a nonessential subordinate clause interrupts an independent clause?

The non-essential subordinate clause is marked off by two commas, which act as a pair of parentheses.

'My cousin is a doctor' (independent clause).

'My cousin, who lives in Manchester, is a doctor' (non-essential subordinate clause; the information 'who lives in Manchester' is merely descriptive).

'My cousin who lives in Manchester is a doctor' (essential subordinate clause; the information 'who lives in Manchester' distinguishes this cousin from my other cousins who live elsewhere, therefore there are no commas).

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Parts of Speech
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

What part is speech is but?

But is a conjunction, a word that connects sentences, phrases or clauses. All of the conjunctions are for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so. Remember it as the FANBOYS. Example sentence:

Rick has borrowed that book, but you may borrow it as soon as he returns it.

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Grammar
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Verbs

What does a prepositional phrase always have?

In most cases, a proper prepositional phrase must contain both the phrase itself and a complement, an additional word or phrase that immediately follws the prepositional phrase.

Complements are typically one of three things:

  1. noun phrase - the most common complement. Ideas such as on the table or under the bridge feature a noun phrase complement.
  2. adjective phrase - Ideas like on fireor for granted. It can also work with the preposition "as" as a what's called a predicative compliment: Joe's attempt to save the puppy was seen as honorable
  3. adverb phrase - These complements are rare, and they are generally found in common phrases, such as before long.

Complements generally occur AFTER the proposition - a long time ago is one example of an exception. It is also possible for prepositions to complement prepositions, but, even in that case, the phrase would still contain a dedicated preposition and complement combination.

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Nouns

What type of word is if?

It can be either a conjunction that introduces a condition a clause, or a noun. Examples:

Conjunction: We can go for a hike if it doesn't rain.

Noun: The one if will be that the funding is available.

See the Related Link below for more details.

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Parts of Speech
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Is over the rainbow a prepositional phrase?

Yes, "over the rainbow" is a prepositional phrase.

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Grammar
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Commas Colons and Semicolons

Should you put a comma before or after anyway?

It depends on what you're writing. Here are 2 examples, one with a comma before and one with a comma after.

Anyway, I didn't want to go.

She can't help you, anyway.

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Grammar
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Verbs

What is a prepositional phrase the snake slithered or under the bush or the cat meowed or watched the show?

Under the bush, ''under'' is the preposition.

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Is the word outside a preposition or adverb?

The term "outside" can be used as a preposition AND an adverb - depending on how the sentence is phrased.

For example:

I walked outside. (In this sentence, "outside" is an adverb because "I walked" can stand alone as an individual sentence.)

Outside of the house, the winds roared. (In this case, "outside" is a preposition because the rest of the sentence cannot stand alone.)

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Is had a preposition?

No. It is a form of "to have" used as a verb or helper verb.

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

When do you use preposition by?

By = indicating place - near, beside, next to:

Somebody is standing by my car, oh it's a policeman.

With a verb of motion by has the same meaning as past:

We drove past the cinema.

By = indicating means, method - a way of doing something:

He went out by the back door.

talking about a means of transport:

I always go to work by bus.

By followed by a passive verb:

The Mona Lisa was painted by Leonardo Da Vinci

By as a preposition indicating time:

The car will be ready by next week.

By in idioms:

by hand, by day, by night, by no means

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Grammar
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Is the word another a preposition?

No. Another is not a preposition. It is a pronoun or an adjective.

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Parts of Speech
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Is should a preposition?

Should is not a preposition, it's a verb.

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Grammar
Sentence and Word Structure
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

What are subordinate and insubordinate clauses?

An Independent clause is independent or main clause expresses a complete thought and can stand by itself as a sentence.

An Subordinate clause is a subordinate (or dependent) clause does not express a complete thought and cannot stand by itself as a complete sentence.

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

What is the missing preposition in the following sentence Nothing can take the anguish of losing a loved one?

Nothing can take - the anguish of losing a loved one

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Grammar
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections
Commas Colons and Semicolons

Do you use a comma before the word although?

that would totally depend on the particular sentence in which it's beingn used - not enough info to say one way or the other

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Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

What is a preposition?

In grammar, a preposition is a part of speech that introduces a prepositional phrase, a group of words that modify a noun or verb by using a noun, pronoun, or gerund (the object of the preposition). In "the man with the car" the word car is used to further specify which man is being addressed. In "he talked about what we should do" the object of the preposition "about" is the entire clause "what we should do."

Some common prepositions are:

about, above, across, after, against, among, around, as, at, before, behind, below, beneath, beside, besides, by, down, during, for, from, in, inside, into, near, of, off,on, out, outside, over, through, to, up, under, with, without and but.

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Grammar
Sentence and Word Structure
Prepositions Conjunctions and Interjections

Make a sentence with the phrase to be caught napping?

I was caught napping.

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