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2011-11-03 20:34:33
2011-11-03 20:34:33

The last year of the 95% copper cents was 1982. Midway through 1982 the US mint replaced the 95% copper coins with copper plated zinc cents, so there are some 1982 cents that are copper, others are zinc. However, all Lincoln cents prior to 1982 are 95% copper, and all circulation Lincoln cents dated 1983 and later are copper plated zinc.

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The last actually US cents were struck in mid-1982. Coins from that year exist in both bronze and copper-plated zinc varieties.


1932 was the last year gold coins were struck for circulation.


It was 1964 when the last coins in the US were made from 90% silver.



1964 was the last year for 90% silver coins and 1970 was the last for 40% silver coins. Special Bicentennial (1776-1976) collectors coins were made in 40% silver. From 1992 to date proof collectors coins have been struck in 90% silver.


1933 was the last year for circulating US gold coins.


The US Mint continues to produce half dollar coins today although they are seldom seen in circulation.


US coins have been struck Copper, Nickel, Gold, Silver, Steel, Zinc, and Bronze. There have been so many different combinations that it would take a pamphlet to list all the different variations.


The US Mint still produces silver coins for collectors. The last year silver coins were produced for circulation was 1964 except for the Kennedy half dollar. These half dollars, minted from 1965 through 1970 contained 40% silver instead of the 90% contained in silver dimes, quarters, half dollars and dollar coins minted prior to 1965.


Quarters and most other silver US coins contained 10% copper; the last coins made of that alloy were dated 1964. The US has never made solid silver circulating coins. Pure silver is far too soft for use in coins, so it was always alloyed with copper for hardness.


Sorry, No US one dollar coins dated 1942. Last year issued 1935


Look at the coin again, no US dollar coins were made in 1936, 1935 was the last year.


2-cent coins were made of the same bronze alloy as 1-cent coins: 95% copper and 5% tin/zinc. Their weight was exactly twice that of a bronze cent, as well - 6.22 gm.


The US has always used copper in most of its coins. Silver and gold coins had at least 10% copper in them to make the alloy hard enough to resist wear. Large cents were made of pure copper, and bronze cents were 95% copper. Even the lowly "nickel" is actually 3/4 copper.


in the US silver coins were last used in 1964, the reason behind the overhaul of coins of which several were heavily made with silver, was available quantities of this precious metal were rapidly decreasing and keeping up with demand for new coins increasingly difficult


ALL us minted coins by stated value for a given year


Quite simply, there were no US dollar coins minted that year.


They have never been all silver, but dimes, quarters, half dollars and silver dollars made before 1965 are 90% silver. The plain and simple answer is: 1964 was the last year


Bronze US cent coins were made from 1864 to 1962 with the exception of 1943 when they were made of zinc plated steel. So a bronze cent would be valued on it's date,condition and rarity not by it's material content.


No US dollar coins were struck in 1949. 1935 was the last year for a US silver dollar. Silver halves were minted in 1949 along with quarters and dimes.


There are new coins all the time. The State quarters, for example, and the presidential dollar coins.


1991 was the last year for a documented case of polio in the US.


The US Mint still produces silver coins for collectors. The last year silver coins were produced for circulation was 1964 except for the Kennedy half dollar. These half dollars, minted from 1965 through 1970 contained 40% silver instead of the 90% contained in silver dimes, quarters, half dollars and dollar coins minted prior to 1965.



1964 for dimes, quarters, and 90% silver half dollars, and 1970 for 40% silver half dollars.



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