Tanakh and Talmud
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Moses

What was the text of Dan Galilee's biography of Moses and Joshua?

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2018-03-12 18:58:29
2018-03-12 18:58:29

This article will give short biographies of Moses and Joshua, and will answer some questions about them.

Moses was an Israelite, a great-great grandson of Jacob. He was born 245 years after the death of Abraham. The time when Moses was born was when the Pharaoh had ordered his people to kill all Israelite male infants because he (Pharaoh) was afraid that the Israelites would become too strong for him (Exodus ch.1-2).

Moses' mother didn't want him to die. So she made a basket for him and put him in it to float in the Nile reeds. He was found by Pharaoh's daughter, who took pity on him (Exodus ch.2) and raised him as her own son.

Moses was forced to flee after killing a cruel Egyptian taskmaster, and went to Midian, where he wedded the daughter of Jethro.

He eventually achieved the highest level of prophecy (Deuteronomy ch.34) and was called upon by God (Exodus ch.3). He brought the Israelites out of Egyptian slavery (Exodus ch.12). He received the Torah from God (Exodus 24:12) and later recorded it in writing (Deuteronomy 31:24). He went up on Mount Sinai for 40 days and nights (Deuteronomy ch.9-10) and brought down the Two Stone Tablets with the Ten Commandments (Exodus 31:18). He brought the Israelites into the covenant with God (Exodus ch.19 and ch.24), and he oversaw the building of the Tabernacle (Exodus ch.35-40). He was the humblest of men and the greatest of prophets (Numbers ch.12).

  • How did Moses know he was an Israelite?
1) In those days, Israelite custom was to nurse babies for up to four years. Since it was his own mother who nursed him (Exodus 2:8-9), his family had plenty of time to teach him before he was returned to Pharaoh's daughter (Exodus 2:10) to live in the palace.

2) Moses was not a prisoner in the royal palace. He came and went as he pleased (Exodus 2:11 and 2:13) and sought out his people (ibid).

  • Did Moses ever sin or make a mistake?
The claim to infallibility is a sure sign of megalomania and prevarication. The Hebrew Bible, because of its Divine origin, kowtows to no man, and prominently spotlights the faults of even its greatest protagonists. In this regard it is unique in ancient literature.

Moses' sin is mentioned (Numbers 20:12 and 24) again and again (Numbers ch.27, Deuteronomy ch.32). He struck the rock which was, by a miracle of God, made into a source of water (Numbers ch.20). He was supposed to speak to the rock instead (ibid). Striking the rock served to slightly diminish the miracle.

It should be self-understood that this criticism of Moses is only in proportion to his greatness. In the final analysis, he remained the most godly person who ever lived (Deuteronomy ch.34).

  • Why was Joshua chosen as leader after Moses?
Joshua had been Moses' right-hand man since his youth (Numbers 11:28) and was his chief disciple; constantly found in the tent of Torah where Moses taught (Exodus 33:11), so as not to ever miss a single word of the Torah being taught. He could be trusted to reach correct decisions (Numbers ch.13-14); and was successful in battle too (Exodus ch.17).

As Moses approached the time when he would have to hand over the helm of leadership, Joshua turned out to be the best choice to carry on, and God named him as Moses' successor (Numbers ch.27).

  • What are the contents of the Book of Joshua?
  1. God tells Joshua to be strong
  2. Joshua sends two spies to Jericho
  3. The Israelites enter Canaan
  4. The Israelites conquer Jericho miraculously
  5. The Israelites are defeated at the city of Ai
  6. The punishment of Achan who violated a national oath
  7. The second battle of Ai
  8. The treaty with the Gibeonites
  9. The battle against the attackers of Gibeon
  10. The conquering of most of Canaan
  11. The division of the land among Israelite tribes
  12. The apportioning of the Levite cities
  13. The apportioning of the Cities of Refuge
  14. The altar built by Reuben and Gad
  15. Joshua's speech to the Israelites
  16. Joshua's death
  • Why did Joshua kill the Canaanites?
God promised Israel (Canaan) to the Israelites (Genesis ch.28, Exodus ch.3), and commanded them to take the land (Deuteronomy ch.1 and many other passages).

Note:

1) The Canaanites were exceptionally wicked (Leviticus ch.18, Deuteronomy ch.18).

2) Israel (Canaan) originally belonged to the Semites (after the Flood) and was gradually seized from them by the Canaanites (Rashi commentary, Genesis 12:6). This was one of the reasons why God gave the land to Abraham and his descendants (Genesis ch.13), since he was a Semite (Genesis ch.11).

3) The Israelites did not simply slaughter the Canaanites. They fought them in proper battle (Joshua ch.10) with miraculous assistance from God (Exodus ch.23).

4) They warned the Canaanites concerning God's command to take Canaan (Jerusalem Talmud, Shevi'it 6:1), and gave them a chance to leave the land (ibid). The Girgashites took the warning seriously and departed to Africa (ibid.), while the Gibeonites made a treaty with the Israelites (Joshua ch.9). The rest of the Canaanites insisted on fighting, and attacked the Israelites with a massive army (Joshua ch.11).

5) Whenever fighting, the Israelites never completely surrounded any town. They offered conditional peace, and then (if peace was rejected) left one area open for escape so that whoever wanted to flee could do so (Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Laws of kings and war ch.6).

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2015-11-06 13:09:44
2015-11-06 13:09:44
  • Moses

Moses was born 245 years after the death of Abraham. The time when Moses was born was when the Pharaoh had ordered his people to kill all Israelite male infants because he (Pharaoh) was afraid that the Israelites would become too strong for him (Exodus ch.1-2).
Moses' mother didn't want him to die. So she made a basket for him and put him in it to float in the Nile reeds. He was found by Pharaoh's daughter, who took pity on him (Exodus ch.2) and raised him as her own son.

Link: More about Moses

Moses was forced to flee after killing a cruel Egyptian taskmaster, and went to Midian, where he wedded the daughter of Jethro.
He eventually achieved the highest level of prophecy (Deuteronomy ch.34) and was called upon by God (Exodus ch.3). He brought the Israelites out of Egyptian slavery (Exodus ch.12).

Link: The Exodus

Moses received the Torah from God (Exodus 24:12) and later recorded it in writing (Deuteronomy 31:24). He went up on Mount Sinai for 40 days and nights (Deuteronomy ch.9-10) and brought down the Two Stone Tablets with the Ten Commandments (Exodus 31:18). He brought the Israelites into the covenant with God (Exodus ch.19 and ch.24), and he oversaw the building of the Tabernacle (Exodus ch.35-40). He was the humblest of men and the greatest of prophets (Numbers ch.12). Link: Problems that Moses faced and overcame

  • Joshua

Joshua had been Moses' right-hand man since his youth (Numbers 11:28) and was his chief disciple; constantly found in the tent of Torah where Moses taught (Exodus 33:11), so as not to ever miss a single word of the Torah being taught. He could be trusted to reach correct decisions (Numbers ch.13-14); and was successful in battle too (Exodus ch.17).
As Moses approached the time when he would have to hand over the helm of leadership, Joshua turned out to be the best choice to carry on, and God named him as Moses' successor (Numbers ch.27).

See also the other Related Links.

Link: What difficulties did Joshua face?

Link: God's promise

Link: Contents of the Book of Joshua

Link: Why did they conquer the Canaanites?

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i think it is because it says on the text


In the original Hebrew text it is Moshe (משה).


A footnote is a small explanatory paragraph of text placed at the foot of a page to illustrate or expand on a portion of text on that page. A biography is a book chronicling someone's life.


they folow the teaching of moses and the profets in the Torah


The Hebrew word Torah is frequently translated as Law. When someone says "the Torah", they are typically referring to the 5 books of Moses, Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy. The Jewish tradition holds that this text was given to (or dictated to) Moses on Mount Sinai by God (perhaps not the final verses of Deuteronomy). Jewish tradition also holds that God also told Moses how to interpret the text, and that Moses passed on this "oral Torah" to Joshua who passed it on, down through the generations to the present. So, the word Torah has a wider meaning than just the revealed text. The word is also used to refer to the interpretive traditions -- in effect, the culture -- that surrounds that text. So, Jews say that the Talmud is a written record of this oral Torah, but it does not stop there. In its broadest sense, Torah is everything that humanity has learned that is true and good. Of course, we might disagree about that, but at its best, the argument about what is true and good can itself be a continuation of or contribution to Torah.


A sacred text reflects the God word revelation to God prophet. Accordingly, Torah is the sacred text revealed by God to Moses, the Bible is the sacred text revealed by God to Jesus, and Qur'an is the sacred text revealed by God to prophet Muhammad (peace be upon them all)


According to the plain text in Exodus, he was 80 years old.


Exodus 20:15 is a good place to start, and actually, you could keep going from there practically to Moses' death at the end of Deuteronomy. The majority of the text consists of Moses receiving, and passing on what he hears to all the people.


Nathan Goldberg has written: 'THE COMMENTARY OF RABBI DAVID KIMHI ON THE BOOK OF JOSHUA (HEBREW TEXT)'


The Hebrews had journeyed from the wilderness of Sin (described as being between Elim and Sinai), when Moses sent Joshua with an army to fight the Amalek, as he watched from a hill top. While Moses held his hand above his head Joshua prevailed, but if he lowered his hand, the Amalek would prevail (Exodus 17:9-13). Eventually Moses' assistants placed a pile of rocks under his arm and his hand stayed steady until the going down of the sun. This would be an absurd 'game' for Yahweh to play on his Chosen People, but it is also hard to imagine as entirely a later fabrication. The tale is much more likely to be an adaptation of an ancient myth involving gods or supernatural powers. There is substantial evidence in the Bible that Joshua was originally worshipped as a sun God, before his story evolved into that of an Israelite hero. The narrative of the miracle of striking the rock is a probable later insertion into the text, but in any case, the Hebrews left the mythical wilderness of Sin - the land of the moon god - then Joshua the sun god had a miraculous triumph over the Amalek, but only until the sun went down.


As we see in the Five Books of Moses (the Torah), Moses wrote in Biblical Hebrew. See also the Related Link.Accuracy of the Torah and untrustworthiness of its critics


There is no suggestion in the text that the snake represented anything except a real snake.


The Torah states (Exodus 24:12) that it is the word of God, penned by Moses (Deuteronomy 31:24).


Based on internal evidence and tradition, Joshua himself wrote much of the book except for, of course, the account of his death and several accounts later added to it. Joshua 24 records that Joshua wrote the words that were added to Moses' books of law: 25 So Joshua made a covenant with the people that day, and set them a statute and an ordinance in Shechem. 26 And Joshua wrote these words in the book of the law of God, and took a great stone, and set it up there under an oak, that was by the sanctuary of the LORD. 27And Joshua said unto all the people, Behold, this stone shall be a witness unto us; for it hath heard all the words of the LORD which he spake unto us: it shall be therefore a witness unto you, lest ye deny your God.


The Torah (five books of Moses).The first five books of the Tanakh (Jewish Bible).



Miriam saved her brother Moses. This well-known story shows that the survival of the leader of the Exodus, Moses, depended on the courage and ingenuity of one young woman, his sister Miriam. Miriam's role as a leader of the Hebrew women was obviously more extensive than is shown in the biblical text. Despite her personal charisma and power, her story has to a large extent been subsumed into the story of her brother Moses. As well, Miriam went on to travel with Moses and Aaron and the Israelites for almost 40 years in the desert.


A:It is too strong a term to say that people "know" that Moses wrote the first five books of the Bible. It is true that many believe he did, and they believe they have cause to believe this. Exodus 17:14 obliquely refers to God telling Moses to write about the war with the Amelek. Similarly, Exodus 24:4 says that Moses wrote the words of God. Several later books of the Bible refer to Moses as the author. These references must be treated with caution. The statements in the Book of Exodus prove nothing, because they could have as easily have been written by the real author (assuming this was not Moses) in order to convince his readers that the book was of great antiquity and reliability. Any textual evidence must be evidence that another author would not have intended to have inserted. Such evidence is found, for example, in Deuteronomy 34:7, which describes the death of Moses, which Moses could not have written. Those who wish to believe that Moses was the author have several answers, one of which is that Moses wrote Deuteronomy, but Joshua added the last few verses after his death. This falls over badly in the text that follows (Deuteronomy 34:10): "And there arose not a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses ..." This can only have been written long after the nation of Israel came into existence. By his carelessness on this one passage, the real author lets us know that Moses did not write Deuteronomy.Scholars say that Moses was not the author of the first five books of the Bible. In fact, over 90 per cent of scholars say that there was no Exodus from Egypt as described in the Bible. Without the Exodus, there was no biblical Moses. People will continue to believe that Moses wrote these books, the Pentateuch or Torah, but the overwhelming evidence is otherwise.



Presuming the question is about methods of Biblical interpretation then the second method after the literal is the allegorical or non-literal method. This method, used by many down through the centuries lends itself to many and varied interpretations, some more, some less in line with what the text actually says. This is different from Biblical typology in that typology, where Joshua is a type of Christ for example has significant warrant in the Biblical text itself and in the name Joshua itself as well as in his work. The allegorical method does not need to be anchored in the clear meaning of the text as is the literal method.


Because Moses played a big part in the Israelites getting away from slavery. Their used - to - be slave owners were the Egyptians.In the Old testament book of Exodus you can read the history of Moses and the Israelites. Moses was used by God to lead the Israelites out of their bondage to the Egyptians. Read the book of Exodus in the Bible and it will explain.Jewish AnswerMoshe (Moses) is important within Judaism because he was the greatest of the prophets, no person before or after him had the same relationship with HaShem (The Creator) as he did.Note: The Jewish Bible is the 'Tanach'. The Christian Old Testament is not considered a valid religious text within Judaism.


It was around 1300 - 1200 BCE.AnswerAccording to Jewish tradition the Torah was given to Moses by God on the sixth of Sivan in 1312 BCE (and the following forty days). AnswerAccording to dating of the text by Orthodox rabbis, the revelation of Torah to prophet Moses (peace be upon him) had occurred in 1312 BCE; another date given for this event is 1280 BCE. AnswerMoses occurred when human went in search of himself means who is he like Rama in Hinduism . According to them about 5000 years ago .Moses teaches how to separate soul from body and Jesus teaching is how to free from Karma.


The Torah, Specifically, the Tenakh, also called the five books of Moses. Christians know this text as the books Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy


Jewish tradition holds that the Torah was given by God (Exodus 24:12) and was conveyed to the Israelite (Jewish) people by Moses (Deuteronomy 31:24).


Ctrl + 2 will double space lines in text like this... text text text text text text text text text text



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