Transportation Accidents

What would happen if a friend lets you borrow his insured car and you get into an accident but you do not own a car or have insurance?

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2005-11-15 03:23:58
2005-11-15 03:23:58

I believe most insurances will cover the damages if the car is insured and you have a license, but if you do not have a license the insurance will not cover anything you are both liable. Your friend is liable for loning you the car without a license and you are liable for driving it.

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almost all states require liability insurance. the fact that the friend had 'non owner' does not mean that it was ok to drive an uninsured vehicle. the law requires the vehicles, not the drivers, to be insured.

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It should, if you let someone borrow your car, coverages should apply.

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generally the person who owns the car at fault involved in the accident is financially responsible. hopefully you have insurance and your friend is not excluded from your policy for some reason. if your friend is not excluded then your insurance company should pay

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ANSWER:Sorry you can not. It's just like driving a car, if you have a friend in your car and you had an accident, the insurance company can not take care of that person because he or she is not insured in your policy..

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Assuming your friend has insurance, they would file a claim against the other insurnace company. If your friend doesn't have insurance, you'll have to pursue your firend civillay to recover damages. Insurance follows the driver, not the car, so it doesn't matter which state the accident was in.

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The rules and laws of insurance vary from state to state but generally speaking it is the automobile that is insured not the driver. So if your friend allows you to drive her insured car and you are involved in an accident you are covered under her policy(((IF her insurance policy does not stipulate restrictions banning unlicensed drivers from operating the vehicle))) in which case her insurance may not cover damages done to her vehicle or injuries to the unlicensed driver.

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Do you have car insurance? Yours will cover it. Your friend if he is a true friend, will cover the deductible.

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Depends. If said friend has insurance then in most cases their insurance will cover the damages due to vicarious liability. If the friend does not have insurance, you are then responsible for any damages caused.

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In the US insurance has nothing to do with speeding. If your state has mandatory insurance, the fact that your car is insured is good enough but the officer may want to see proof of insurance. Here it is the vehicle that is insured, not the driver. In UK you should not let anyone drive your car on the public road without checking they are insured. You can be fined if you let them drive without insurance.

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no No. The person who is borrowing the car must also have insurance.

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There is more than one answer to this question. Because you did not state who was at fault in the accident. If the other driver was at fault, it is that person or their insurance company that is responsible for the repairs on your car. If it is the friends fault, then it is the friend that is responsible. Even if the friend did or did not know you had did not have insurance.

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Your friend is. If she is over 25 she is normally covered. Because you claim on youe insurance, technically it will be an at fault accident and your premium may go up. You should talk to your insurer.

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The people responsible for an automobile accident are those who are operating the involved vehicles at the time of the accident - unless the cause is mechanical failure or some other event outside the control or any of the operators. The person responsible for paying for the resulting damages may be the vehicle owners or the person who bought the vehicle insurance (usually, but not always, the same person). When operator negligence is involved, the operator may be responsible for paying the damages, even though the operator is not the insured person.

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It would be a very foolish move to put a friend on your car insurance because if they have an accident you will have to pay any expenses. This also includes letting a friend use your car.

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First of all, it depends who it is from. If it is from a rental company, i dont know. but if it is from a friend i think you are liable for the damages.

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No. Your friend is most likely not a named insured on your homeowners insurance policy. Your homeowners insurance policy is specific to you and your property. It would also not cover the losses of a tenant.

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As long as she has the correct insurance that allows the car to lent to a friend then it should cover you.

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You need to involve parents or a lawyer, as appropriate.

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First of all a friend does not borrow your car without your permission- if they used it without your permission they really arent your friend and they technically stole your car- Unauthorized use of a motor vehicle- Their insurance will cover them only if you file a complaint with the police stating that the person did not have your permission to use the car. Otherwise your insurance will cover the loss and your rate may jump or you may get cancelled. Your call- depends on how much the claim is and how good the friend is

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If you let a friend borrow a car who had no insurance and you had no insurance, essentially two violations have been committed. He is responsible, but you are too. It is unlikely that a court would award you with damages.

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The driver of the vehicle would be considered as secondary. Say you own a car, and are insured with company X. You let a friend borrow your car, and they have insurance with company Y. If there is an accident that exceeds the limits of the policy for company X, then company Y would pay up to their policy limit to cover the remainder of the balance for damages. If the driver does not have their own insurance, then potentially both the driver and the vehicle owner could be sued and be responsible for damages.

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Only if the friend gets into an "at fault" accident.

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Yes. It is your car, you are responsible.Owners LiabilitySince you state that the vehicle and the insurance is in your name. Then presumably your insurance will have to pay the bill. That means the accident will go on your insurance claims record and can effect your insurance rates for the next 3 to 5 years.Remember that a vehicle owner and the driver are both equally, severally and jointly 100% liable financially for any damages or injuries arising from the permissive use of your vehicle.


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