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Math and Arithmetic
Physics

When an object moves with inconstant velocity does its average velocity differ from its instantaneous velocity?

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Wiki User
February 16, 2008 10:24AM

Generally it is a Yes. Instantaneous velocity is the exact velocity at a particular time in the course of the movement. However, average velocity is the average of all the instantaneous velocity over a period of time. It is also known as speed in everyday life. As a result, the movement of an object over a time period under varying velocity denotes a varying instantaneous velocity which could be different from the average velocity. It is however, possible that the instantaneous velocity equates to the average velocity at a certain point over the duration of movement. For example, a ball is traveling at instantaneous velocity of 99m/s at t=1s , 100m/s at t=2s and 101m/s at t=3s. the average velocity over the 3s period is hence 100m/s which coincides with the instantaneous speed at t=2s.