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German measles (rubella)

When should you receive the rubella shot?

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2005-10-13 11:09:00
2005-10-13 11:09:00

You sould have your immunity tested before you have the shot. You may be naturally immune as rubella is a very mild disease for children. If you are hoping to get pregnant you should have the shot and not get pregnant for a month afterwards. If you are pregnant, have the shot straight after the birth and don't get pregnant again for a month. Some women have been pregnant and had the shot (by mistake) and their babies have not been affected, but I wouldn't risk it.

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Yes, there is a shot for rubella. It is not that comnon to get the shot these days.

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Women without immunity should receive immunization against rubella provided that they avoid pregnancy for a period of three months following immunization.

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Flu shot, Chicken pox shot, TDEP shot(tetanus,diptheria, and another virus)

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Yes, the rubella test (igg) should be positive during pregnancy, which means that you have taken the vaccination prior. Negative result (igg) doesn't mean that you are infected with rubella, however this means that you doesn't have Rubella antibodies in your blood stream. If your result comes out negative, then you should perform another test for Rubella igm, positive results will confirm your infection with this virus.

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All non-immune women of childbearing age should be vaccinated against rubella and chickenpox before pregnancy. Pregnant women should be tested for immunity to rubella at their first prenatal visit.

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12 months, unless they're traveling to an area of epidemic, in which case they might get a monovalent measles, mumps or rubella earier.

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The current recommendation is to receive a tetanus shot every ten years.

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Hmm nothing much if you're not pregnant. It's just that when you're bearing a child for the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, if you were to get infected by Rubella, chances of your child having Rubella for life is high. If you had the shot, you wouldn't get affected by Rubella and your future child won't face any problems at all. It's best to go safe :)

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Rubella is known to cause birth defects when diagnosed in the first trimester, however terminating a pregnancy is a personal decision which should be discussed with your doctor.

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A repeat injection should be given at about 10 or 11 years of age.

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When released, the newborns get a shot in a vein in their forehead.

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Yes, and it's usually grouped with the immunizations for mumps and rubella (German measles) in the MMR shot.

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nursing diagnosis for rubella

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because in make you immune to measles, mumps and rubella

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No, it is not. However, congenital rubella syndrome is. This occurs when a pregnant woman contracts rubella early on in her pregnancy. The rubella may or may not affect the infant.


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