answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2016-06-28 14:31:58
2016-06-28 14:31:58

Not exactly.

The first law of thermodynamics, i.e. the law of conservation of energy, also accounts for heat as one of the many forms that energy can take. There is no one law called "the law of thermodynamics", but there are several "Laws of Thermodynamics" (note the plural form "LAWS").

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2016-06-21 22:20:10
2016-06-21 22:20:10

The First Law of Thermodynamics is another name for the Law of Conservation of Energy.

001
๐Ÿฆƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0

Related Questions


Energy can't be created or destroyed. The First Law of Thermodynamics is also known as the Law of Conservation of Energy.


First Law of Thermodynamics is also known as Conservation of Energy. Second Law of Thermodynamics means that useful energy is continuously being converted into unusable energy - there are irreversible processes in our Universe, with respect to energy. Read the Wikipedia articles for a more thorough discussion.


That law is known as the Law of Conservation of Energy. It is also known as the First Law of Thermodynamics.


The first law is also known as law of conservation of energy. It say that the energy can neither be created nor be destroyed but can only be transferred. Its is given by this equation dQ = dU + dW .


You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.You can't create energy out of nothing (First Law of Thermodynamics); this is an experimentally established fact (i.e., no exceptions are known). Nowadays, the law of conservation of energy (or First Law of Thermodynamics) is often derived from Noether's Theorem, but that is some advanced math.You can convert one type of energy to another, but see also the Second Law of Thermodynamics.


The study of the relationship between mechanical work, heat and other forms of energy and energy transfer is known as thermodynamics. Thus, thermodynamics is the study of heat, temperature and the conversion of mechanical work into heat and vice-versa.


That is known as the "Law of Conservation of Energy". It is also known as the "First Law of Thermodynamics".


It always applies. There are no known processes in which the Law of Conservation of Energy (i.e., the First Law of Thermodynamics) doesn't apply.


It's called the Law of Conservation of Energy.


That is called Conservation of Energy. It is also known as the First Law of Thermodynamics.


That is known by two different names: (1) Law of Conservation of Energy, (2) Second Law of Thermodynamics.


I think the word you're looking for is "thermodynamics."


A violation of the first law of thermodynamics would be the creation or destruction of energy. There are no such examples known. Nuclear fusion or nuclear fission both produce energy by transforming matter (which by Einstein's theory of relativity, is concentrated energy).


You didn't specify what you mean with "the following".To the best of our knowledge, conservation of energy ALWAYS applies. There are no known cases when you can create energy out of nothing, or simply make it disappear.


That is known as the "Law of Energy Conservation". It is also known by the alternative name, "First Law of Thermodynamics".


it is known as 2 thing the first law of thermodynamics and the law of conservation of energy


the first law of thermodynamics also known as the law of the conservation of energy states that energy cannot be created or destroyed during a chemical reaction but can only be transformed or converted from one form to another.


That law is known as the Law of Conservation of Energy; also as the First Law of Thermodynamics.


Perpetual energy is energy that is never ending. Some scientists say that there is a way to redefine the laws of thermodynamics, creating what is known as hypothetical machines that produce indefinite amounts of energy.


This law is known mainly with two different names: "Law of Conservation of Energy", or "First Law of Thermodynamics".


Yes. There are no known exceptions - otherwise it would not be considered a law


The Law of Conservation of Energy, also known as the First Law of Thermodynamics.


That probably refers to the First Law of Thermodynamics, also known as the Law of Conservation of Energy. It means that the total amount of energy in a closed system (for example, in the Universe) can't increase or decrease.


That is called the Law of Conservation of Energy. It is also known as the First Law of Thermodynamics. Basically, there is a physical magnitude called "energy", the amount of which doesn't change over time.


There is always an energy loss. There is never a 100% effective transfer of power. Such is known as the Second Law of Thermodynamics. In brief 'enthropy is always increasing.'



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.