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When was Last copper cent mint date?

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Answered 2009-01-09 02:41:37

The last copper (actually bronze) cents were made in mid-1982. The mints gradually changed over to copper-plated zinc as the remaining stocks of bronze blanks were used up.

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The "S" mint mark is used by the San Francisco mint and is located just below the date on the 1941 Lincoln cent.


The price of copper increased during the early 1980s, and by 1982 it cost the Mint more than 1 cent to mint each cent. Trial strikes in different metals were made but a combination of price and lobbying by zinc producers convinced the Mint to switch from solid bronze to copper-coated zinc. The change was made in the middle of 1982, so coins with that date may be made of either composition.


The last year for copper Canadian pennies was 1996.


Without knowing details like the date, mint mark, and condition, the best possible answer is one cent.


The price of copper increased during the early 1980s, and by 1982 it cost the Mint more than 1 cent to mint each cent. Trial strikes in different metals were made but a combination of price and lobbying by zinc producers convinced the Mint to switch from solid bronze to copper-coated zinc. The change was made in the middle of 1982, so coins with that date may be made of either composition.The best way to tell them apart is to use a scale capable of weighing at the gram level. A bronze cent weighs about 3.11 gm, while a zinc cent comes in at about 2.5 gm.


From 1793 to date the mint has NEVER used a "P" mintmark on any one cent coin.


It's worth 2 cents for its copper content.


The last Australian 1 cent coins were put into general circulation in 1990. There were "Mint Packs" released in 1991 for collectors. The last Australian 2 cent coins were put into general circulation in 1989. There were "Mint Packs" released in 1990 & 1991 for collectors. The Australian 1 and 2 cent coins were progressively removed from circulation in 1994.


It is called a Lincoln Cent and it is valued from $1 to $75,000 depending upon the mint mark, the condition of the coin and any mint errors.


The first true copper penny issued by the US mint was minted in 1793, commonly called a "large cent" due to it's size. The first predominantly copper "small cent" was issued in 1864, after the 1856-1863 cents were a 88-12 copper-nickel alloy that gave them a nickel-like appearance. In 1982, the US mint began using a copper coated zinc alloy for pennies, ending the run of the solid copper penny.


If you're referring to a U.S. cent, they were all made of bronze from mid-1864 to 1942 and again from 1944 to the middle of 1982(*). That means there are hundreds of possible coins to choose from so more information is needed - the date, and if the coin is dated 1908 or later, whether it has a mint mark. To find the mint mark on a 1908 or 1909 Indian cent, look on the back under the wreath to see if it has a small "S". On Lincoln cents, look under the date for a D or S. Any cent that doesn't have a mint mark is normal, it was simply made in Philadelphia. (*) To fill in the gaps, cents were made of steel in 1943 to save copper for the war effort, and the composition was changed to copper-plated zinc in 1982 because copper had become too expensive.


The mint mark on the Lincoln cent is under the date on the obverse of the coin, it can only be a "D" or "S" no other mint marks are used.


Two Proof sets were issued in 1960 the only difference is the Lincoln cent, one set has a large date cent and the other is a small date cent. Retail value of the large date is $23.00 the small date is $33.00 the numeral 0 is smaller then normal for the small date.



The mintmark for all Lincoln cents is under the date.


The mint is the facility where it was made, so I assume you're referring to the mint MARK, which is the letter that indicates the facility. The mint mark position on a 1909 Indian head cent is on the back under the wreath. On a Lincoln cent, it's under the date. Most 1909 cents were made in Philadelphia so they don't have mint marks. Only a relatively small number were in San Francisco, and they carry an S mint mark.


If it has an S mint mark and a whitish color, it's made of copper and silver. If it has a D mint mark above the date or no mint mark (Phila.) it's actually made of copper and nickel. Please see the Related Question for more.


In 1946 the US Jefferson Nickel contained 75% copper and 25% mickel.


No - there are three types ... 392,021,000 with no mint mark 57,154,000 with D mint mark 57,154,000 with S mint mark for 1919 USA 1 Cent. The mint mark (if present) is below the date.


Between changing the composition of the US one-cent coin (often referred to as a "penny," even though the word has never appeared on the US coin) and experimenting with the size of the date, there are 7 different types of 1982 pennies: * 1982 copper, small date * 1982-D copper, small date * 1982 copper, large date * 1982-D copper, large date * 1982 copper-plated zinc * 1982-D copper-plated zinc * 1982-S copper proof It's easy to tell between the different mint marks; just look below the date. The plated zinc cents are slightly lighter, and don't give the distinctive "ring" of a copper (actually a copper-zinc alloy) cent. The only way to tell between the date sizes is to study pictures of the two, and notice the distinctions in how they look. Note that there was only one proof type, minted only in San Francisco.


All 3 cent pieces issued by the US Mint had dates. If yours is worn so the date is not on it anymore then you will have to be know whether it is a silver 3 cent or a nickel 3 cent. The nickel 3 cent is about the size of a dime and the silver 3 cent is smaller than a dime. Without a date the value of these coins would be about $1-$2 for the silver 3 cent and about 25-50 cents for the nickel 3 cent.


With no mint mark, 25c to $5 depending on condition. With an S mint mark below the date, $1.50 to $33.


It changed in mid-1982. When the price of copper increased the Mint was forced to make cents out of copper-plated zinc instead of bronze. The mass of a bronze cent is 3.11 grams, while a zinc cent has a mass of 2.5 gm.


A Circulated 1983 US Cent is worth its face value.Starting in 1982 The US Mint changed the composition of cents from Copper to Copper-Plated Zinc due to the rise in cost of Copper.



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