Chemistry

Which is warmer a cup of warm water or a bathtub of warm water?

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2009-08-08 23:46:29
2009-08-08 23:46:29

If they were the same temperature then neither, they would both be the same warmth. the difference would be the energy they give off, the cup would have a lot less energy and would cool faster in a room with a lower temperature than it. the bath tub would cool a lot slower, and a lot more warm energy would be released into the air making the air around it a lot warmer than the small cup would. that is if infact the cup is a normal sized cup and the bath tub a normal size.

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