Genetics

Which ratio of dominant to recessive phenotype did Mendel find in?

123

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2015-06-25 16:47:52
2015-06-25 16:47:52

Mendel worked with sweet peas. Not all organisms have such straight forward genetics.

001
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2015-06-25 15:37:50
2015-06-25 15:37:50

Mendel found the 3:1 ratio of dominant to recessive phenotype.

001
๐ŸŽƒ
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


The expected phenotype for a Mendal F1 monohybrid cross is 3:1. Looking at heterozygous parents (F1) who share the same dominant trait, e.g. Straight tail.Crossing two heterozygous parents from the F1 generation results in an F2 generation that produces a 75% chance for the appearance of the dominant phenotype, of which two-thirds are heterozygous, and a 25% chance for the appearance of the recessive phenotype, giving the ratio 3;1.Inheritance pattern of dominant and recessive phenotypes when each parent is homozygous for either the dominant or recessive trait. All members of the F1generation are heterozygous and share the same dominant phenotype, while the F2generation exhibits a 3:1 ratio of dominant to recessive phenotypes.


25% homozygous dominant50 % heterozygous (with a dominant phenotype)25% homozygous recessive


Phenotype: 75% T 25% t Genotype: 25% pure dominant 25% pure recessive 50% heterozygous


To determine the genotype of an individual that shows the dominant phenotype you would cross that individual with one that is homozygous recessive. A monohybrid cross of two individuals that are heterozygous for a trait exhibiting complete dominance would probably result in a phenotype ratio is 3 dominant 1 recessive.


Rr x Rr will yield you 1/4 homozygous dominant phenotype (RR), 1/2 heterozygous dominant phenotype (Rr) and 1/4 homozygous recessive phenotype (rr). As for the wording, the homozygous dominant will show the dominant trait, the heterozygotes will follow suit and the homozygous recessive will exhibit only the recessive trait.



Gregor Mendel was able to determine traits by the ratio in which they appeared. For instance, he determined that a recessive trait will show up 25 percent of the time if one parent has it.



All of the F1 generation are heterozygous, therefore 100% exhibit the dominant phenotype. The F2 generation has a ratio of 1 homozygous dominant: 2 heterozygous: 1 homozygous recessive. This results in a phenotypic ratio of 3 dominant: 1 recessive.


The phenotypic ration in F1 generation will be 3 : 1. Three individuals showing dominant trait and one individual with recessive trait. However, the genotypic ratio will be 1:2:1.That is one homozygous dominant, two heterozygous dominant and one homozygous recessive individuals.


3:1 homozygous dominant, heterozygous dominant, heterozygous dominant and homozygous recessive.


In a monohybrid cross with one parent homozygous dominant and the other homozygous recessive The phenotype of the F1 offspring will be 100% that of the parent with the dominant allele. A cross of two of the F1 offspring will be 75% phenotypically like the dominant allele and 25% will be hommozygous recessive or 3 to 1


For a punnet square counting only one trait: Count all of the ones that have a capital letter. This is the number with the dominant phenotype. All of the ones with both lowercase letters are the recessive phenotype.


He hoped comparing the ratios would help explain it. Not sure if this is correct.


A monohybrid cross of two heterozygotes would be expected to produce the phenotypic ratio of 3:1 (3 dominant: 1 recessive).


Mendel observed phenotypes for seven contrasting characters segregating in to three is to one ratio mathematically and thus he propounded the principle dominance and recessive characters


Genotypes (phenotype) 25% homozygous dominant (free earlobes) 25% homozygous recessive (attached earlobes) 50% heterozygous (free earlobes) 75% phenotypically dominant (free earlobes) 25% phenotyically recessive (attached earlobes) Ratios Genotype 1:1:2 Phenotype 3:1


In dominant epistasis a F2 cross yeilds a typical 12:3:1 ratio. Of the two genes controling the phenotype one is termed the epistatic gene and must be present in homozygose recessive form before the second genes the hypostatic gene, alleles will be expressed in the phenotype. If it helps to think about it one gene is "stronger" than the other and both alleles for the strong gene must be recessive before the second gene gets a chance to alter phenotype.


If the parents were AA and AA for example then the phenotype ratio will be 1 A (the dominant allele). The genotype will be 1Aa.


These are the phenotypic ratios of each outcome: Dominant A and B: 9/16 Dominant A and recessive B: 3/16 Recessive A and dominant B: 3/16 Recessive A and B: 1/16




The genotypes of this cross are:AA - 25%Aa - 50%aa - 25%The phenotypes of this cross are:Dominant trait (A) - 75%Recessive trait (a) - 25%A ratio of dominant to recessive phenotypes - 3:1


the phenotype ratio is the physical appearance


It depends on the parents. The parent could have two dominant genes which would give a 0% chance of the offspring being recessive. The only way that the offspring could have a recessive characteristic is if the both parents have one dominant and one recessive gene, a 25% chance. The chance that both parents would pass on the recessive gene (if they have one dominant and recessive gene) is also 25%, because there is a 50% chance for each parent.



Copyright ยฉ 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.