Who invented the typewriter?

The first typewriter, a invention made by the Austrian carpenter Peter Mitterhofer in 1864, can be seen at the technical museum in Vienna (Austria).

Christopher Latham Sholes also invented a typewriter. Sholes was a U.S. mechanical engineer who invented the first practical modern typewriter, patented in 1868. Sholes invented the typewriter with partners S. W. Soule and G. Glidden, that was manufactured (by Remington Arms Company) in 1873.

Interestingly, they put all the letters for the word 'typewriter' into the top line, to make it easier for demonstrators.

The actual concept of a typewriter goes back at least to 1714, when Englishman Henry Mill filed a poorly-worded patent for "an artificial machine or method for the impressing or transcribing of letters singly or progressively one after another."

The very first typewriter proven to have actually worked was built by the Italian, Pellegrino Turri in 1808 for his blind friend Countess Carolina Fantoni da Fivizzano.

Sholes applied for a North American Patent in 1873 and his machine introduced the qwerty keyboard. The machine was actually produced by the Remington Arms Company.

The first typewriter was invented and patented by Christopher Latham Sholes in 1867. His design was improved, modified and adapted by other engineers in the late 19th Century.