answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2006-06-24 22:46:14

I believe whomever caused the accident is At Fault, whether their car was damaged or not. * The evidence compiled in the accident investigation will determine the responsible party. To determine who is at fault in a vehicle accident investigators use a method referred to as "chain of causation" and begin the investigation with the vehicle that was last in motion. This does not necessarily mean that the driver of said vehicle is the one responsible for the accident. It is quite possible that the driver of the vehicle that was not damaged will be the one determined to be responsible for causing the accident.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions


If with "one impact from the last car" you mean that the rear car hit the middle car and then the middle car, as a result, hit the front car, the rear car's insurance would be responsible for all damages. If the middle car first hit the front car and then the rear car hit the middle care, the rear car's insurance would only be responsible for the damages to the middle car. i.e. where was the first impact?


Only if it's her car, or the son was intoxicated by something he obtained from his mother.


I was in a 3 car accident. An uninsured motorist hit the car in front of me, the second vehicle (who has insurance) then hit my car. Doesn't the car who hit me become responsible for my damages?AnswerYes, the at fault party is responsible for your damages. AnswerKeep in mind, in multi vehicle accidents, usually, the responsible party's insurance co. prorates the amounts paid (up to the policy's limit) among the claimants, meaning that at the end you may still be owed money, which the only way to collect is if you sue the person at fault for the accident.


Only if the co-signer insists on that arrangement. However, the cosigner should be fully informed of their vulnerability when they take on such a responsibility. They will be fully responsible for paying off the loan if the primary borrower defaults, fully responsible for making certain the car is fully insured and they will be legally vulnerable should there be an accident resulting in damages.Only if the co-signer insists on that arrangement. However, the cosigner should be fully informed of their vulnerability when they take on such a responsibility. They will be fully responsible for paying off the loan if the primary borrower defaults, fully responsible for making certain the car is fully insured and they will be legally vulnerable should there be an accident resulting in damages.Only if the co-signer insists on that arrangement. However, the cosigner should be fully informed of their vulnerability when they take on such a responsibility. They will be fully responsible for paying off the loan if the primary borrower defaults, fully responsible for making certain the car is fully insured and they will be legally vulnerable should there be an accident resulting in damages.Only if the co-signer insists on that arrangement. However, the cosigner should be fully informed of their vulnerability when they take on such a responsibility. They will be fully responsible for paying off the loan if the primary borrower defaults, fully responsible for making certain the car is fully insured and they will be legally vulnerable should there be an accident resulting in damages.


No, you can only be liable for the loan. If the car was totaled and did not have insurance then you can be held responsible for the balance on the loan. Any accident or damages that occurred would be the responsibility of the driver/owner of the vehicle. All your signature did was say that you will pay the loan if the borrower fails to do so.



No. If you had an accident with your husbands car and you were at fault with only PLPD insurance, the damages to your vehicle would not be covered.


If you have an accident with an uninsured vehicle, you and your insurance company are still liable for all damages, even though the other vehicle has no insurance. The only thing that will happen to the other driver is a citation for driving with no insurance.


If you were at fault, your insurance co will cover the damages to the other vehicle ONLY, not your....and vise virsa.


If a person is responsible for an injury, such as in a car accident, you would first go to that person's insurance for the damages. If insurance is exhausted or denies the claim, you can then go directly to the responsible party for payment. If they do not pay voluntarily, you would need to file a civil suit. In the case of an auto accident, if you have uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage, you company may cover your damages and handle the suit against the responsible party on your behalf.


If the accident is your fault, your liability coverage will pay for the other person's damages. You will be out of luck as no coverage will be afforded for the damages to your vehicle or any injuries to you or your passengers.


Absolutely, this person can and will sue you. Just because he/she wasn't licensed doesn't mean that you have the right to get in an accident with him/her. The only thing that will happen to the other person is get a citation for driving without a license, or whatever the case may be. You are still responsible for all damages.


yes you should get reembursed for the damages and you can sue for pain and suffering. but only if it wasn't your fault


The driver is responsible for whatever goes on in the car. If he/she is distracted he shouldn't be driving but should immediately pull over. If he/she has used the poor judgment to allow an irresponsible person in the car and is subsequently distracted, the driver is still responsible. In the end, no matter what happens, the driver is responsible.


only if the lien holder caused the collision


That is an insurance form that is commonly used by the state BMV to show that you are willing to be financially responsible for any damages to another driver or his vehicle. This is normally needed only if you have had your license suspended due to lack of insurance after having had an accident.



Punitive DamagesPunitive Damages? You have to first understand that "Punitive" is "Punishment". Punitive damages can be awarded against a defendant for a violation of your civil or legal rights, your liberties, if they somehow sought to deny you due legal process in law or you could prove that the accident was an intentional or reckless act.If the at fault party caused the accident intentionally, violated your rights in some way or violated the law in the insurance settlement process then you may have grounds to seek punitive damages.If the at fault party were simply at fault in an accident that was not intentional and without substantive violation of your rights, liberties or legal process then you would have no grounds under which to seek "punishment" or punitive damages against them. They would only be liable for actual damages. A punitive award would not be justified.Sometimes an accident is just an accident. You could sue but unless you could prove some reckless disregard or intentional cause such as road rage then it is not likely you could win a punitive award.Good Luck and Happy Motoring


Probably not, as most policies only cover drivers not listed on the policy if they were given permission to drive. If you gave your unlicensed daughter permission to drive, then you can be issued a ticket. However, if the accident was not your daughter's fault, then the at fault party is responsible for the damage they caused to your vehicle, regardless if the other party was licensed or not.


If it was your fault then your freind is liable for the damages. If it was the other guys fault then his insurance will pay for it. Keep in mind, while legally it is the owners responsibility for the damages, he can sue you if he wanted to.


It's not necessary for a waiver as the co-signer would not be responsible. A co-signer is only responsible for repayment of the loan, if the primary borrower defaults.


A company owns a truck that is used to move semi-trailers and this company is self insured has leased a driver from another company and the driver has an accident on the truck owners property that involves only the truck who would be responsible for the damages. The company who owns the truck and their insurance or the company who leased the driver ?


No. If it is your car, your insurance is responsible. If the partner has an accident, your insurance may drop you from your policy for violating the terms. The terms should say somewhere in there that you are responsible and will be the only person to opperate your vehicle. I have seen people take their friends to court and win small lawsuits for damages to their car. So, your partner would have to pay out of pocket for damages if you want to avoid insurance problems. It is best to add him/her to your policy if they are going to drive your car.


Only if the crash was a result of a mechanical defect in the car, and you knew of the defect before loaning the car to them. If the crash resulted from their actions while driving (or another person's), you are not liable. If the person driving your car was at fault, you will be responsible for any damages.


Whatever your friend does in that car whether it be DUI or an accident you are responsible for all damages and expenses not to mention your insurance may not cover anything at all and will more than likely drop your insurance or move to high risk class. If a driver gets stopped by police and found out without license, you are NOT responsible...you are only responsible if you give them permission to drive your car.



Copyright ยฉ 2021 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.