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Answered 2012-11-28 16:19:17

George Washington made Thanksgiving a annual holiday

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Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President, issued the first official proclamation that made Thanksgiving an annual national holiday.


President Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday in the USA in 1863.



As President of the United States, George Washington proclaimed the first nationwide thanksgiving celebration in the US.


George Washington declared Thanksgiving a national holiday in 1789. However, the Continental Congress (president John Hanson) made the first actual national proclamation on March 16, 1776. The following year, a national day of prayer and thanksgiving was observed on December 16, 1777. The date of Thursday, November 26, 1789 was the date used by Washington, following the precedent of Thursday, November 28, 1782. The annual observance was established by Abraham Lincoln in 1863, and observed each year since then.


President George Washington issued the first official government proclamation of Thanksgiving in 1789. President Abraham Lincoln made it a yearly official national holiday in 1863.


As President, on October 3, 1789, George Washington made the proclamation


George Washington [February 22, 1732-December 14, 1799] declared Thanksgiving a national holiday. He issued his proclamation on October 3, 1789. He asked that the celebrations be held on November 26th.But Thanksgiving as a national holiday just didn't take off. Its observance required the efforts of two more presidents to become a reality. Abraham Lincoln [February 12, 1809-April 15, 1865] issued a similar proclamation on October 3, 1863. The Lincoln Proclamation was more successful and longer lasting than the Washington Proclamation. But it was 32nd U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt [January 30, 1882-April 12, 1945] who finally succeeded in making Thanksgiving a permanent fixture in the nation's life. Thanksgiving became a federal holiday, with the passage of 55 Stat 862 of December 26, 1941.


A holiday is a day on which individuals aren't expected to follow usual or even any work schedules. The day is supposed to honor a particular event or person. So Thanksgiving was made a holiday through the national proclamation of 16th U.S. President Abraham Lincoln [February 12, 1809-April 15, 1865]. The Lincoln Proclamation of Thanksgiving Day was issued on October 3, 1863. Subsequently, under the efforts of 32nd U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt [January 30, 1882-April 12, 1945], Thanksgiving Day became a federal holiday [55 Stat 862] in 1941.


Surely not. The cornucopia ("horn of plenty") is an ancient symbol of food and abundance, arising out of Greek mythology. It has become associated with the holiday we observe as Thanksgiving. But the Pilgrims didn't know they were having something called "Thanksgiving" at that first feast in 1621. They didn't say "This is the first Thanksgiving." It was just a big holiday feast of celebration. Commemoration came later.The Wikipedia entry for Thanksgiving tells us that the first official Thanksgiving Proclamation made in America was issued by the Continental Congress in 1777. Later on, in 1789, it became a national holiday.



The first proclamation was issued by George Washington during his first year as President. It sets aside Thursday, November 26 as "A Day of Publick(sic) Thanksgiving and Prayer." Signed by Washington on October 3, 1789 and entitled "General Thanksgiving,"On October 3, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for the observance of the fourth Tuesday of November as a national holiday.In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday to the third Thursday of November (to extend the Christmas shopping season and boost the economy). After a storm of protest, Roosevelt changed the holiday again in 1941 to the fourth Thursday in November, where it stands today.


The "first" Thanksgiving proclamation was issued by the Charlestown, Massachusetts Council on June 29, 1676. It was celebrated after the genocide of Native American Indians.


King George III issued the proclamation of 1763.


No, the Pilgrims did not have a harvest feast the following year (1622), because the harvest was so poor. In fact, they did not begin to prosper until around 1625. The harvest feast was not considered a "day of thanksgiving" by the English--to them, a day of thanksgiving was a religious observance. The Pilgrims did have a day of thanksgiving in 1623, not for the harvest, but for rain, which ended a long drought. Over the next 150 years, harvest feasts were held sporadically throughout the American colonies, in good years. It was not until 1789 that George Washington declared "a day of public thanksgiving and prayer", to give thanks to God for the establishment of a self-governing nation of people. Even then, Thanksgiving was not an annual holiday. In 1863, Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation setting the date of the Thanksgiving holiday that we now observe.


George Washington [February 22, 1732-December 14, 1799], as the first U.S. President, issued a proclamation on October 3, 1789. By that proclamation, he asked the nation to observe a national day of Thanksgiving. He set the date for November 26th.


Slaves were not immediately freed when the Proclamation was issued because slave owners could not be made to actually free their slaves. The Proclamation was issued in 1863.


The first U.S. President, George Washington [February 22, 1732-December 14, 1799], was first to issue a proclamation of a national Day of Thanksgiving. The Washington Proclamation was issued on October 3, 1789. The second U.S. President to issue a proclamation to the same effect was 16th U.S. President Abraham Lincoln [February 12, 1809-April 15, 1865]. The Lincoln Proclamation was issued on October 3, 1865. The 32nd U.S. President, Franklin Delano Roosevelt [January 30, 1882-April 12, 1954], didn't issue a proclamation. He instead saw to it that the day became a federal holiday by law [55 Stat 862] of December 26, 1941.


Richard Nixon signed Fathers' Day into law in 1972. Lyndon Johnson issued a proclamation recognizing it in 1964. Woodrow Wilson and Calvin Coolidge came out in favor of the holiday but neither issued an official proclamation about it. The holiday in the US has been mostly promoted by retailers of men's clothing and greeting card companies. It is the biggest day of the year for collect phone calls.


The Continental Congress issued the First National Proclamation of Thanksgiving in 1777. George Washington declared Thanksgiving Day as a national holiday in 1789 and again in 1795.John Adams declared Thanksgiving Days in 1789 and 1799.No Thanksgiving proclamations were issued by Thomas Jefferson but James Monroe declared a Thanksgiving Day in 1814 and twice in 1815.There were no more national Thanksgivings until 1863 when Lincoln designated one on the final Thursday of November. All the following Presidents annually declared this date as Thanksgiving day until 1939 when there were five Thursdays in the month and Franklin Roosevelt decided to declare it on the fourth Thursday. In 1940 and 1941 he proclaimed the third Thursday as Thanksgiving. Since a Presidential Proclamation is not legally binding, 23 states celebrated on the third Thursday, 22 celebrated on the fourth, and Texas took both days off!In 1941, Congress passed a joint resolution fixing the traditional last-Thursday date for the holiday beginning in 1942. A Senate amendment to that resolution changed the date to the fourth Thursday. President Roosevelt signed this bill on December 26, 1941, making the date of Thanksgiving a matter of federal law.


The Emancipation Proclamation was issued twice. First one was in September 1862 and again in January 1863.


President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first Veterans Day Proclamation.


Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation.


The Emancipation Proclamation was issued 1 January 1863. It was issued during the American Civil War. This took place from 1861-1865.


On October 3, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for the observance of the fourth Tuesday of November as a national holiday. In 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday to the third Thursday of November (to extend the Christmas shopping season and boost the economy). After a storm of protest, Roosevelt changed the holiday again in 1941 to the fourth Thursday in November, where it stands today.



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