US Presidents

Who presides if the President of the US is on trial to be impeached?

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2012-09-30 19:27:23
2012-09-30 19:27:23

The president remains in his position during the trial. The Chief-Justice of the United States presides over the trial in the Senate,

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Trial is held in the house and Supreme Court justice presides.


The Senate overseen by the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides over an impeachment trial


The vice-president of the US normally presides over the senate, including impeachment trials. In the special case that the president is impeached, the Chief Justice of the US presides over the trial.


The Chief Justice presides over the Senate trial if a US President has been impeached.


If the president is impeached, the US Senate holds a trial. The Chief-Justice of the United States presides over the trial. If the president is convicted by a 2/3 vote of the voting senators, he is removed from office and the vice-president is sworn in as the new President. If he is not convicted by the required 2/3 majority, that is the end of the affair.


When the president is tried for impeachment charges, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides at the trial.


The US Senate hold the trial and serves as the jury in the event that the President is impeached by the House of Representatives.


The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides over such a trial. That is only if the President is being impeached. If any other federal official, justice or judge is impeached it is the Presiding Officer of the Senate. That may be the Vice President of the S, the President pro tempore, or some other presiding officer that the Senate may designate.


The Chief Justice of the US presides over Senate impeachment trials of a president.


The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides over the Senate trial if a US President has been impeached. Under ordinary circumstances, the Vice-President presides over the trial, but impeachment of the President would present a conflict-of-interest for the Vice-President. For more information, see Related Questions, below.


Yes. If the President is being tried for impeachment in the Senate, the Chief Justice of the United States (Supreme Court) presides over his (or her) trial. For all other impeachment trials, a committee presides over the trial, but the President of the Senate (US Vice-President), or someone he or she designates, makes decision about points of procedure.


The Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court presides over such a trial.


The Chief Justice of the United States presides over the Senate in trials for impeachment. Impeachment trial of the President has only occurred twice in American history, first for Andrew Johnson and more recently for Bill Clinton. They were both acquitted.


Under current Senate rules the Chief Justice of the US presides over the trial.


The Chief Justice of the US presides in the US Senate; certain members of the US House of Representatives, where the president was impeached, serves as sorts of prosecutors called managers. The Senate is the jury and 2/3 votes are required to convict sand remove the president.


After the House of Representatives has voted to impeach a president, the actual trial is conducted by certain members of the House chosen by that body to act as the prosecutor in much the same way that a prosecutor or district attorney conducts trials against people accused of a crime. The Senate serves as the jury in the trial and the Chief Justice of the US serves as the judge who presides over the trial.


As prescribed by the United States Constitution, the Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court presides over the Senate an impeachment trial of an American President.


Congress would follow normal procedures if a Justice of the US Supreme Court were to be impeached. The House of Representatives would vote on impeachment, and trial would be conducted in the Senate. The President of the Senate or an appointed "Impeachment Trial Committee" presides over the Senate trial. This procedure is used for the removal trial of all officials other than the President, and became official practice in 1986 when the Senate amended its rules and procedures for impeachment trials. The only time the Chief Justice participates in Senate impeachment trials is if the President of the United States is on trial. For more information, see Related Questions, below.


If the House of Representatives votes to impeach (bring charges against) the President, he (or she) would go on trial in the Senate. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court presides over the trial.


The president must be formally charged with a crime (impeached) by the House of Reps. and then must stand trial in the US Senate. If convicted, he/she is removed. Impeached does not mean removed. We have impeached two presidents, but have never removed one.


The president must be formally charged with a crime (impeached) by the House of Reps. and then must stand trial in the US Senate. If convicted, he/she is removed. Impeached does not mean removed. We have impeached two presidents, but have never removed one.


Andrew Johnson was the first US president to be impeached. He was not convicted.


The US senate hold the trial if the president, or other high-ranking official is impeached by the House of Representatives. 2/3 of the senators are required to convict.


No. The power of impeachment and trial belongs to Congress. The House of Representatives impeaches; the Senate conducts the trial. When the US President is tried in the Senate, however, the Chief Justice of the United States (Supreme Court) presides. Under all other circumstances, the Vice-President presides over Senate trials.


All impeachment trials are overseen by the Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court.



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