San Antonio

Who was the Spanish governor of san antonio Texas in 1820?

123

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered
2011-10-27 21:14:08
2011-10-27 21:14:08

Antonio María Martínez

001
😂
0
🎃
0
🤨
0
😮
0
User Avatar

Related Questions


The address of the Alamo Public Telecommunications Council is: 501 Broadway, San Antonio, TX 78215-1820


Spanish exploration in the Southwest really didn't lead to European settlement in Texas. The Spanish explored in the 1500's, but Texas wasn't settled until the 1820's. The two are not related.


José Antonio Conde died in 1820.


Francisco Antonio Mourelle died in 1820.


José Antonio Cabrera died in 1820.


Yes, he became the first governor when it separated from Massachusetts in 1820. William King who was in office in 1820 and 1821.


Yes, he was once the governor of The Missouri Territory from 1813 to 1820.


Antonio Valladares de Sotomayor died in 1820.


Antonio Álvarez Jonte died on 1820-10-18.


Hardin Richard Runnels (born August 30, 1820 in Mississippi; died December 25, 1873 in Bowie County, Texas) succeede Elisha M. Pease as the sixth Governor of Texas, serving between December 21, 1857 and December 21, 1859, including the whole of 1858.


Elisha M. Pease (born January 3, 1812 in Enfield, Connecticut; died August 26, 1883 in Lampasas, Texas) succeeded James W. Henderson as the fifth Governor of Texas, serving between December 21, 1853 and December 21, 1857. Following the end of Pease's term as Governor, Hardin Richard Runnels (born August 30, 1820 in Mississippi; died December 25, 1873 in Bowie County, Texas) became the sixth Governor of Texas, serving between December 21, 1857 and December 21, 1859.


Hardin Richard Runnels (born August 30, 1820 in Mississippi; died December 25, 1873 in Bowie County, Texas) succeede Elisha M. Pease as the sixth Governor of Texas, serving between December 21, 1857 and December 21, 1859. Following the end of Runnels' term as Governor, Sam Houston (born March 2, 1793 in Rocksbridge County, Virginia; died July 26, 1863 in Huntsville, Texas) became the seventh Governor of Texas, serving between December 21, 1859 and March 18, 1861.


William Findlay until 19 December 1820 followed by Joseph Hiester for the balance of the year.


The Mexican government starts to offer land to the Americans in Texas because colony. This was in the year 1820.


Mil ochocientos veinte


Mexico owned Texas before it was bought by the U.S. in 1820


He came to Texas, during the year of the 1820's, and he was the one who had discovered Texas.



William Wyatt Bibb (born October 2, 1781 in Amelia County, Virginia; died July 10, 1820), the first Governor of Alabama, served between December 14, 1819 and July 10, 1820.


The majority of immigrants to Texas during the 1820's were from the South. These people did not want to give up their slaves. Other people who came to Texas during that period were Eastern Europeans from Sweden, Denmark, and Ireland.


In 1820, Spain held the land that would become Texas. They encouraged Americans to settle in Texas because not enough Mexicans had taken the opportunity to settle there. When Mexico gained their independence, they continued the immigration policy that the Spanish had put in place.


David Holmes (born March 10, 1769 in York County, Pennsylvania; died August 20, 1832 near Winchester, Virginia), the first Governor of Mississippi, served as Governor between December 10, 1817 and January 5, 1820. Following the end of Holmes' term as Governor, George Poindexter (born 1779 in Louisa County, Virginia; died September 5, 1853 in Jackson, Mississippi) became the second Governor of Mississippi, serving between January 5, 1820 and January 7, 1822.


Moses Austin began his 800 mi journey to Texas in 1820.


William King (Democratic-Republican) was Maine's first governor. He was in office from March 15, 1820 until May 28, 1821.


Shadrach Bond (born November 24, 1773 in Frederick, Maryland; died April 12, 1832 in Kaskasia, Illinois), the first Governor of Illinois, served between October 6, 1818 and December 5, 1822, including the whole of 1820.



Copyright © 2020 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.