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Whites and free blacks from the North

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Myra Hodkiewicz

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Q: Who were most often the the teachers in freedmens bureau schools?
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Who were most often the teachers in the freedmens bureau schools?

Whites and free blacks from the North


Who were most often the teachers in freedmens bureau schools?

Whites and free blacks from the North


Who were most often the teachers in the freedmen's bureau schools?

whites and free blacks in the north


Who were most often the teachers in freed and bureau schools?

In freedmen's and bureau schools, the teachers were typically northern whites, missionaries, and former abolitionists who were committed to educating freed slaves. They were often driven by a sense of moral duty and a belief in the importance of providing education to African Americans. The Freedmen's Bureau also recruited some African American teachers to help educate newly freed slaves.


Who most often teachers in Freedman's bureau schools?

The Freedman's Bureau was created to help former slaves transition into White society. Very often white middle class people, who were teachers, traveled South in order to help Blacks gain an education.


Who were most often the teachers in freedmen bureau schools?

Teachers in the Freedmen's Bureau schools came from a wide variety of backgrounds. They were evangelicals and free-thinkers, male and female, black and white, married and single, Northerners and Southerners. Most were southern whites, about a third were blacks, and only about one-sixth were northern whites. There were more men than women. The black teachers were the ones most likely to stay.


Who were most often teachers in Freedman's Bureau schools?

The Freedman's Bureau was created to help former slaves transition into White society. Very often white middle class people, who were teachers, traveled South in order to help Blacks gain an education.


Who were most often the teachers in Freedmen's Bureau schools?

Teachers in the Freedmen's Bureau schools came from a wide variety of backgrounds. They were evangelicals and free-thinkers, male and female, black and white, married and single, Northerners and Southerners. Most were southern whites, about a third were blacks, and only about one-sixth were northern whites. There were more men than women. The black teachers were the ones most likely to stay.


Who were most often the teachers in the freedmen bureau schools?

Teachers in the Freedmen's Bureau schools came from a wide variety of backgrounds. They were evangelicals and free-thinkers, male and female, black and white, married and single, Northerners and Southerners. Most were southern whites, about a third were blacks, and only about one-sixth were northern whites. There were more men than women. The black teachers were the ones most likely to stay.


Who were often the teachers in freedmen bureau schools?

Teachers in the Freedmen's Bureau schools came from a wide variety of backgrounds. They were evangelicals and free-thinkers, male and female, black and white, married and single, Northerners and Southerners. Most were southern whites, about a third were blacks, and only about one-sixth were northern whites. There were more men than women. The black teachers were the ones most likely to stay.


Who were most often the teachers in freedmen in bureau schools?

Teachers in the Freedmen's Bureau schools came from a wide variety of backgrounds. They were evangelicals and free-thinkers, male and female, black and white, married and single, Northerners and Southerners. Most were southern whites, about a third were blacks, and only about one-sixth were northern whites. There were more men than women. The black teachers were the ones most likely to stay.


Who were most often the teacher in freedman's bureau school?

In Freedman's Bureau schools, teachers were typically Northern white men and women, as well as some African Americans. They were often missionaries or volunteers who came to the South to help educate newly freed slaves after the Civil War.