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Why did they choose Pong as the first video game and not The Odyssey?

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2011-09-13 23:28:36
2011-09-13 23:28:36

im very unsure but i think pong was the first made video game it took i think 1-2 years to get another one im not that old but im just giving you info on what i remember on G4

AnswerI wanna know, who are "they"? There was no choice about what the first video game would be. There just were no Video Games, and then there was one. The Odyssey was the first home TV video game system, and basically it was 'pong' as you would think of pong. It was a paddle game that looked just like pong on screen, it just wasn't called pong. It was invented by Ralph Baer around 1966, but not marketed until 1972 when The Odyssey was released by Magnavox, and that was the first home video game. Later that same year, Nolan Bushnell (Soon to be founder of Atari) released Pong. He claimed it was not a copy of Baer's game, but it seems obvious that it was.

Note also .. while The Odyssey (Pong) was the first home video game system, it was not the first video game, or first electronic game. The origins are not entirely clear, but the eariest known electronic game was "Tennis For Two", invented by a New York physicist named Willy Higinbotham around 1958, which was similar to pong. It was never marketed, but was on display and playable for two years.

Then, in 1962 the first 'computer game' was invented by a guy named Steve Russell at MIT. It was called "Spacewar", and was programmed into the PDP-1 computer (an early computer that cost $120,000.). It was a 2-player space battle game that played similar to Asteroids.

I learned these things from the book "High Score! The Illustrated History Of Electronic Games" by Rusel Demaria & Johnny L Wilson.

Ted Whitten

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Related Questions


The first Video game has been debated for several years. It depends on your definition of a video game. Most people believe it is pong but video games date far before pong, the answer is the 1966 game Odyssey.


The first video game company is debatable and there is no straight answer as many people have different definitions as to what the criteria is for something to be considered a video game. But the first company to produce a home game system was Magnavox who created the Odyssey. The Odyssey predates pong and was released officially in 1972 while home pong systems did not hit the market until 1975.


In 1972 that Magnavox released the first home video game console which could be connected to a TV set---the Magnavox Odyssey, invented by Ralph H. Baer. The Odyssey was initially only moderately successful, and it was not until Atari's arcade game Pong popularized video games, that the public began to take more notice of the emerging industry. By the autumn of 1975 Magnavox, bowing to the popularity of Pong, cancelled the Odyssey and released a scaled down console that only played Pong and hockey, the Odyssey 100.


The first video game ever made was PONG! Pong was a revolutionary 2D version of tennis/ping pong, hence the name, PONG, from ping PONG.


pong The first video game was Tennis for Two not Pong


Tennis was a game on the Magnavox Odyssey, the first video game system that was released in September of 1972. PONG was a game on the Atari 2600, which was released in October of 1977. Therefore, Tennis came first


No. The first video game was Pong.


Ralph Baer created Pong, as the first video game.


It was not until 1972 that Magnavox released the first home video game console, the Magnavox Odyssey, invented by Ralph H. Baer. The Odyssey was initially only moderately successful, and it was not until Atari's arcade game Pong popularized video games, that the public began to take more notice of the emerging industry. By the autumn of 1975 Magnavox, bowing to the popularity of Pong, cancelled the Odyssey and released a scaled down console that only played Pong and hockey, the Odyssey 100. A second "higher end" console, the Odyssey 200, was released with the 100 and added onscreen scoring, up to 4 players, and a third game - Smash. Almost simultaneously released with Atari's own home Pong console through Sears, these consoles jump-started the consumer market.


Pong. It's an electric ping-pong game.


From what I recall the first video game was Pong, but I could be wrong.


The first video game was Pong and it came out in 1975.


Pong is widely accepted as the first 'video game.'


It is most commonly believed and accepted that the video game "Pong" was first. But it is not certain.


the first video game ever made was pong pong was originally not a game but a communication device used in wars



tennis for two then pong


The first video game was pong. But the first console was Atari.


In 1972, the first commercial video game console that could be played in the home, the Odyssey was released by Magnavox and designed by Ralph Baer The Magnavox Odyssey is the world's first video game console. It was first demonstrated in May 1972 and released that fall, predating the Atari Pong home consoles by several years. The Odyssey was designed by Ralph Baer, who had a working prototype finished by 1968. This prototype, known as the "Brown Box", is now at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C.


If you mean Video Games, Pong Stick


It was one of the first, along with atari.


pong (the first was space war)


The first game that you could go out and buy was Pong, but there were many (recorded) games before Pong, but you could not buy them.


Pong was the first commercial video game. In 1958, the first video game was developed using an oscilloscope and was called "Tennis for Two".


In popular opinion it's Pong, however another game called Naughts and Crosses was made earlier. Most people state that N&C isn't really a video game so Pong must be the first. I belive Pong is the first myself.



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