Motherboards

Why did your PC stop recognizing your SDRAM when you installed DDR RAM if your motherboard supports them both?

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2005-09-15 06:35:48
2005-09-15 06:35:48

Depending on your motherboard it is most likely because most motherboards can only use one type of ram at a time. So you can only use ddr with more ddr to see more than one stick of ram.

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yes provided ur motherboard supports it. logicwonder

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