answersLogoWhite

0


Best Answer

Because when they return home, Scout has a mysterious blanket draped over her shoulders, one that does not belong to their family.

User Avatar

Wiki User

12y ago
This answer is:
User Avatar
More answers
User Avatar

AnswerBot

2mo ago

Atticus tells Scout to ignore Jem in the treehouse because Jem made a bad decision to disobey Atticus's instructions, and ignoring him is a consequence of his actions. Atticus wants to teach Jem about responsibility and the importance of following rules.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

14y ago

Because when Jew and Scout came inside, Scout had a blanket on her so Atticus thought they went somewhere to get it.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

11y ago

Atticus knows Jem is just seeking attention - if Scout ignores Jem, he will eventually come down.

This answer is:
User Avatar

User Avatar

Wiki User

12y ago

he was probably fapping...

This answer is:
User Avatar

Add your answer:

Earn +20 pts
Q: Why does Atticus tell Scout to ignore Jem in the treehouse?
Write your answer...
Submit
Still have questions?
magnify glass
imp
Related questions

What does Atticus tell scout to do when she hears ugly words at school?

Atticus advises Scout to ignore the ugly words and not let them bother her. He believes that paying attention to such words only gives them power, and that true courage is in standing up for what is right regardless of what others say.


What does atticus tell scout to do when she hears ugly talk?

Atticus tells Scout to ignore ugly talk and not let it bother her. He advises her to consider the source and remember that people may say hurtful things out of ignorance or fear. Atticus emphasizes the importance of staying true to one's values and principles.


What does did dill tell Atticus he does at the lake with Jem and scout?

Dill told Atticus that they were just having lunch.


What does Atticus tell scout will be hers when she is older?

Atticus tells Scout that she can have more confidence in herself and her judgments as she gets older. He also mentions that she can count on him for guidance and support.


What did scout make Uncle Jack promise not to tell Atticus?

uncle jack promises to not tell atticus that scout got in a fight, Scout is worried that atticus' feelings mite get hurt wen he knows that his family is talking bad stuff about his


What chapter does Atticus tell Scout to obey Calpurnia?

Atticus tells Scout to obey Calpurnia in Chapter 3 of "To Kill a Mockingbird." This happens during a conversation where Scout questions Atticus about why Calpurnia is considered a part of the family. Atticus explains the importance of respecting Calpurnia and following her instructions.


What page does Jem tell Scout Atticus wouldn't like her bragging about him?

77


What did mrs.caroline tell scout to stop doing with atticus?

Mrs. Caroline asked Scout to stop reading with Atticus. She believed that Scout had already learned to read at home and should focus on other subjects in school.


What does Atticus tell Jem and Scout about their misbehavior?

Because they don't know what its like to be in her position.


How much does Atticus tell Scout about Radley house?

Atticus tells Scout very little about the Radley house, as he wants to respect the privacy of the reclusive Radley family. He also wishes to instill in Scout a sense of empathy and understanding for others' perspectives. Atticus encourages Scout to be compassionate and respectful towards Boo Radley and his family.


What does Miss Caroline tell Scout to tell her father?

1) stop teaching scout to read 2) stop teaching scout to wriite


How does he answer Scout when she asks how to tell whether or not someone is black How does Scout respond to his explanation What does th?

Atticus tells Scout that you can tell a person's race based on their physical appearance, such as the color of their skin. Scout responds by questioning this explanation and expressing confusion over why skin color should matter in determining a person's identity. This moment highlights Scout's innocence and Atticus's attempt to educate her about the racial prejudices ingrained in society.