answersLogoWhite

Top Answer
User Avatar
Wiki User
Answered 2013-03-12 10:18:55

Stem burns are severe than that of boiled water because steam possess the heat require to convert water from liquid to steam i.e. Latent heat and the heat possessed by the steam for boiling.whereas the hot water lacks the latent heat and only possess the heat applied.

001
๐Ÿ™
0
๐Ÿคจ
0
๐Ÿ˜ฎ
0
๐Ÿ˜‚
0
User Avatar

Your Answer

Related Questions


Steam often causes worse burns than boiling water because as the steam condenses on the skin, it releases the latent heat of vaporization, which is very significant for water. Thus, more heat is transferred to one's skin, exacerbating the burns.


stem because it would actually burn your skin and like melt it off in a way and burning water only leaves a big mark on your skin. Steam often causes worse burns than boiling water because as the steam condenses on the skin, it releases the latent heat of vaporization, which is very significant for water. Thus, more heat is.released It depends on the lenght of exposure, but steam will generally burn more severely because steam is hotter (sometimes much much hotter) than boiling water, hence why it is steam in the first place.Added:Steam causes more severe burns as compared to boiling water because steam contains more heat (i.e 40.6 kJ/mol condensation heat) then boiling water, both at the same temperature 100 oC.From that condensation is momentanous when in contact with skin, after being liquefied it behaves the same as boiling water: still 100 oC and cooling down is slower than condensation.


Steam burns are painful because they damage the skin just like any other burn. Steam burns hurt because the water in steam keeps the heat trapped in the skin.


A fire burn consumes your skin as fuel and would keep going until the fuel is gone or it is deprived of oxygen. A steam burn is just water or a liquid that has a lot of thermal energy that it wants to transfer to something that is colder (like your skin). A fire burn would persist, while a steam burn would just get it's thermal energy sapped out and condense into a liquid.


As the steam comes in contact with the skin, it becomes water, and releases more energy (about 2188 joules per gram) on contact than water at the same temperature.


No. That's the temperature at which water turns to steam. If it comes in contact with your unprotected skin, it will burn you, i.e. cook the skin.


In theorie... no... in practice... yes. The steam has 6 times the amount of heat energy. If the 1 gram of steam would be applied to the same surface area of skin as the 1 gram of water, and all the steam would give off its heat till it has the same temperature of the skin, it would have given off about 6 times the amount of heat as the liquid water. This would result in a way more severe burn. But steam wil spread its heat over a way larger surface area, it wont condens easily on your skin (because a skin temperature of 30oC isn't exactly cold) and it doesnt stick to your skin like liquid water does. So i would rather have the 1 gram of steam poured over me than the 1 gram of water.


This is so because when a 100 degree steam comes in contact with our skin it converts into water , energy required to convert in water is taken from our skin in form of latent heat which causes far more severe burns than putting our hand in 100 degrees water :) . dont try this experimentally .


Because gases or vapours like steam are much poorer conductors than liquid water. The heat energy given to the skin area takes longer to dissipate (or go away), so the damage to your skin is greater.


Steam carries more energy than boiling water. When water is at its boiling point, it requires additional energy to boost it into a gaseous state. When the steam comes in contact with a cooler object and condense back to a liquid, it releases that energy as heat. If that object is human skin, that heat will cause a burn. - - - - - It would be very rare to have steam with the same temperature as boiling liquid water. The only way to keep water liquid past 100 degrees C is to put it under pressure. By contrast, once you have formed steam you can raise it to just about any temperature you want - there are many industrial processes that require steam at 600 degrees F. Hence, at least part of the reason burns from steam are more severe than burns from boiling water, is the steam is hotter.


steam causes severe burns because of change of state i.e. liquid to gas with effects our skin. where as boiling water is only liquid which is hot but it does not effect the skin more than water.Thus higher the temperature of steam as compared to water. cause more severe burns than boiling water


AnswerSteamAdded:Steam causes more severe burns as compared to boiling water because steam contains more heat (i.e 40.6 kJ/mol condensation heat) then boiling water, both at the same temperature 100 oC.From that condensation is momentanous when in contact with skin, after being liquefied it behaves the same as boiling water: still 100 oC and cooling down is slower than condensation.


Steam causes more severe burns as compared to boiling water because steam contains more heat (i.e 40.6 kJ/mol condensation heat) then boiling water, both at the same temperature 100 oC.From that condensation is momentanous when in contact with skin, after being liquefied it behaves the same as boiling water: still 100 oC and cooling down is slower than condensation.


Steam causes more severe burns as compared to boiling water because steam contains more heat (i.e 40.6 kJ/mol condensation heat) then boiling water, both at the same temperature 100 oC.From that condensation is momentanous when in contact with skin, after being liquefied it behaves the same as boiling water: still 100 oC and cooling down is slower than condensation.


Because when in contact with human skin steam condenses into boiling water. This causes the serious damages seen in steam burns.


depends on skin. you can have tough skin or week skin


It requires energy to change the state of water from liquid (water) to gas (steam), so even thought they are at the same temperature, the same amount (1 gram) of steam holds more energy than 1 gram of liquid water at the same temperature. If the steam came in contact with a person's skin, it would lose energy, some of it absorbed by the person (causing damage), and it will not reduce temperature until it is condensed, because all of the energy lost was due to the state change.


It depends on the lenght of exposure, but steam will generally burn more severely because steam is hotter (sometimes much much hotter) than boiling water, hence why it is steam in the first place. Boiling water can only get so hot before it all becomes steam.Added:Steam causes more severe burns as compared to boiling water because steam contains more heat (i.e 40.6 kJ/mol condensation heat) then boiling water, both at the same temperature 100 oC.From that condensation is momentanous when in contact with skin, after being liquefied it behaves the same as boiling water: still 100 oC and cooling down is slower than condensation.


When boiling water hits the skin it burns; but immeiately starts to cool down having given up some of its heat to the body. When steam hits the skin it starts to condense; giving up its latent heat of vapourisation and remains at 100 degrees until condensed. So in this case more heat is given up to the skin, hence the burn is more severe.


yes, your skin is it like water it burn at 100 f


Steam has more heat capacity than boiling water by its condensing to liquid and after that it'll conduct heat better as being liquified.Added:Steam causes more severe burns as compared to boiling water because steam contains more heat (i.e 40.6 kJ/mol condensation heat) then boiling water, both at the same temperature 100 oC.From that condensation is momentanous when in contact with skin, after being liquefied it behaves the same as boiling water: still 100 oC and cooling down is slower than condensation.


Although water boils at 100 degrees Celsius, steam can be much hotter than that. This is why steam burns can cause so much more damage to the skin than hot water burns.


Getting hot oil or steam or something like that onto your skin


Previous answer was "It can be at a higher temperature" that's true but not nearly the whole story. A magicaly property of water-steam is the huge amount of energy involved in the "Latent Heat of Vaporization", that's the energy required to vaporize water to steam after the fluid is at boiling temperature (nominal 212F). To heat water takes about 1 BTU/lb-Deg F so heating water from 112 to 212 takes about 100 BTU, once at 212 F it take another about 1,000 BTU to vaporize it, no change in temperature, still at 212 F. So going the other way, such as with a steam burn your skin must remove that same 1,000 BTU just to condense the steam before the temperature drops at all. So answer is not just the temperature but the huge amount of energy in the steam that holds that temperature. With water, by the time 100 BTU/lb are transferred to your body, water is down to 112 F, if you get hit with steam, your body must absorb 1,100 BTU/lb of steam before you get to that condition. Get it? 11-time more energy so a very much worse burn.


When steam contacts skin it immediately converts from vapor to liquid. When this conversion takes place, amount of energy released is much greater than water at its boiling point. This is due to the difference between the specific heat and the heat of vaporization of water. For every gram of water that condenses on your skin, it is subjected to 720 joules of energy, versus 37 for water in the liquid state at the same temperature. The steam releases almost 20x more energy than the same amount of water. Add to this the fact that steam is a gas, and it will expand to the entire volume of its container, meaning it will "attempt" to burn your entire body as opposed to what little of your body the water can touch.



Copyright ยฉ 2021 Multiply Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. The material on this site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply.