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Why does the current change at an extension plug when connected to a lamp?

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2007-05-31 15:11:29
2007-05-31 15:11:29

Are you saying that you plug in a lamp and another lamp on that extension cord goes dimmer? If so then the extension cord wire is of a smll guage size and causing a voltage drop from the outlet to the cord output.

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A: Because both item are connected is series. Any resistance connected in series will carry the same current no matter of the resistance value or the number of resistors. However for an incandescence lamp the value will change when turn on and change when it is hot, That is because lamps have different property then resistance when cold and hot

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Assuming you are referring to house lamps, these are always connected in parallel with each other. Each lamp will draw a current, the value of which depends on the wattage of the lamps. As each lamp is added, the supply current will increase by the amount of current drawn by that lamp.

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A: The current is not a function of voltage available but rather the power needed to light the lamp. To answer your question a 100 watts lamp will require 1.83 times more current for a lamp rated as 100 watts at 120 volts.It is a basic ratio 220:120AnswerI disagree with the previous answer. The power rating of a lamp only applies when the lamp is subject to its rated voltage -which is why both values are shown on the lamp (e.g. 60 W / 120 V).So, if you subject a lamp to less than its rated voltage, it will not achieve its rated power. In fact, the decrease in power will be significantly greater than the corresponding decease in voltage. It will certainly not 'compensate' by drawing more current!However, to directly answer your question, the current drawn by a lamp connected to a 220-V supply will indeed be greater than the current drawn by the same lamp connected to a 110-V supply.


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