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Will a Mercury 845gl motherboard support 1gb ddr ram and which ddr 1 or 2?

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2008-03-18 14:22:45
2008-03-18 14:22:45

hi, 845 gl can only support ddr1 ram-400mhz and sd ram but any one of this. not both support it at a time.

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I have this motherboard with 1GB RAM but it is DDR. If a Motherboard supports DDR it cant support DDR2.


The motherboard chipset or memory controller probably doesn't support it.


What memory your motherboard can use will depend entirely on your motherboard. There is no way for someone to answer a generic question like this.I can add a personal note that I did upgrade my dad's laptop to contain one 1GB stick as well as the 512MB it came with. Of course, I have no idea what motherboard it has (or even what manufacturer it is).


buy single 1GB ram and put it in single slot ... it works fine... I'm using 1gb ddr1 ram PC 333 on Intel 845 motherboard... its wrking fine...


Yes, as long as the motherboard is not picky about the RAM, it should work fine, but the motherboard will throttle the RAM to PC2100 speed if that is the fastest it supports.


The best 1gb graphic card for your computer depends not merely on the motherboard of Intel DG43NB but also other factors. The brand does not really matter as long as compatible with your computer.


My friend, there is a thing, the main part of the system known as motherboard and there are certain "limitations" to every board...So what I wanna say is if you increase the RAM you will surely find some change in speed but the maximum amount of RAM that can fix on to a motherboard varies like you cant keep 2gb for a motherboard which can support 1gb ram ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- The above data has some extra info too but I thoughtr you should know this!!! SIMPLY THE ANSWER IS YES


Windows XP doesn't directly determine what type of memory can be used; it depends on the motherboard. If the motherboard is compatible with Windows XP and the motherboard supports this memory module, then you can use it with Windows XP.


Most of card are but you need to specify which board and card including model names.


Im afraid this is not possible. This motherboard takes DDR and / or SD ram, not DDR2.Both SD and DDR can not be used at the same time. IMHO DDR would be the better choice.Max allowed would be 2Gb (ddr 266 or ddr 200 buffered)Max allowed is 1Gb, unbuffered.Hope this helpsBe safe


I think the 1gb 2rx16 is best!


PC 2700 Memory, for a 1GB DIMM, costs around $14. There are also places offering a 2GB kit (2x 1GB DIMMs) for around $37. You should make sure that the memory you buy is the correct specification for your motherboard, or it may not work.


1GB has way more memory. 1GB is 1000 MB. so 512 MB is about half of 1GB


Whatever memory your motherboard can support but a 64bit version of Windows is needed to manage more than 4GB of RAM. Generally people use 32bit version ram for all the Windows Operating Systems. So for that it is enough to have 1GB ram. I think 1 GB ram is more than enough for it. In case If you prefer to choose a 32 Bit version of Windows 7 Then you have to upgrade your hardware to 1GB or more than that.


32mb=2^25, 1gb=2^30, so 1gb = 32*32mb.


A computer can hold memory depending on how strong the motherboard and the processor is. For example you have a Pentium 1 computer, obviously you cannot afford to put a 1GB memory on it.


1gb is the same as 1024mb.


1gb is greater than 1kb


1GB is greater than 1632KB.


1GB is bigger than 1MB


4GB is bigger than 1GB. 4GB = 4000MB 1GB = 1000MB 1 is smaller than 4...



1000kb = 1mb 1000mb = 1gb 1,000,000kb = 1gb


4.23GB is greater than 1GB. By a factor of 4.23.



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