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Answered 2009-05-03 18:03:30

No, the custodial parent does not have topay anything to the other parent. The NON-custodial parent will still have to pay something as their contribution to the support of the child(ren) , but because of the difference in incomes it may be fairly small.

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While not the norm, yes, it can happen, and is based on the non-custodial's parenting time. However child support calculation is complicated and involves many factors. Consult an attorney in your area for an informed opinion.


Yes, if there's anything left in the estate after the higher priority creditors (if any) are paid.


In Florida, what is taken into consideration is the custodial AND non-custodial parents income. An affidavit is filed in court (for the hearing), to accurately provide the financial information on both parents. Those numbers need to be verified and are used to determine the custodial parents' financial obligation for all expenses regarding the childrens' needs AND the non-custodial parents' obligation for the same. Usually 49% and 51% respectively. For example: Custodial parents' income is higher than non-custodial. 4 teenagers in High School (no daycare) with higher than normal expenses for food, clothing etc. No medical issues require a total of $1200/month to raise. Custodial parent- 49%= $588 (doesnt have to be paid because you have kids) Non-custodial parent-51%= $612 (you are "awarded" this amount) IF SHE EVEN PAYS


A custodial parent may have to pay child support if his income is significantly higher than that of the non-custodial parent based on the non-custodial parent's "parenting time" percentage.


Usually the custodial parent when all of the rules are met by the custodial parent and the qualifying child to be claimed as a QC dependent.Go to the IRS gov web site and use the search box for Publication 17 go to chapter 3Qualifying ChildResidency Test Rule 3Children of divorced or separated parents or parents who live apart. In most cases, because of the residency test, a child of divorced or separated parents is the qualifying child of the custodial parent. However, the child will be treated as the qualifying child of the noncustodial parent if all four of the following statements are true.Custodial parent and noncustodial parent, The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the year. The other parent is the noncustodial parent.Equal number of nights, If the child lived with each parent for an equal number of nights during the year, the custodial parent is the parent with the higher adjusted gross income.You can click on the below related link for more information and examples.


If the custodial parent or grandparent's income is significantly higher than yours, you may be granted support based on your parenting time percentage with the child, but that would be an unusual situation.


It is not the custody agreement that determines who is qualified to claim the children as a qualified child dependents on a income tax return.Go to the IRS gov web site and use the search box for Publication 17 go to chapter 3Qualifying ChildResidency Test Rule 3Children of divorced or separated parents or parents who live apart. In most cases, because of the residency test, a child of divorced or separated parents is the qualifying child of the custodial parent. However, the child will be treated as the qualifying child of the noncustodial parent if all four of the following statements are true.Custodial parent and noncustodial parent. The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the year. The other parent is the noncustodial parent.Equal number of nights. If the child lived with each parent for an equal number of nights during the year, the custodial parent is the parent with the higher adjusted gross income.You can click on the below related link for more information and examples.


No, sole custody fathers can also be ordered to pay child support if their income is significantly higher. This is common in California.


The person might be able to obtain an interrogatory for discovery of income from the family court, but that is not likely. The income the custodial parent makes is not relevant in accessing the amount of child support That is based on the income and assets of the person who has been ordered to pay the support. I'm thinking you have to make a motion in court to request income records. The income of both parents must be known to determine the amount the noncustodial parent has to pay, since it's usually based on the ratio of the noncustodial parent's income to the total of both parents' incomes. As has been noted, child support is based upon the income and assets of the biological parent who has been ordered to pay the support. The income of the custodial parent is not relevant, as the monies are for the support of the children. One issue pertaining to the financial support of the child/children is how it relates to dependant deductions pertaining to the tax codes. Actually both incomes are used to determine the amount of child support. It is done by percentages. Both parents are responsible for paying for their children. If the father makes more than the mother he will be responsible for the higher percentage on the amounts spent on the necessities of the child. I've worked in the legal field for almost 30 years. There are some differences in the laws among the states, but they basically follow the Uniform Child Support Laws. My daughters lived the majority of the year with my ex. My income was much less. I did not have to pay child support. My ex had to pay me support when the girls lived with me during the summer months.


According to most recent United States census data, 68% of fathers with child support responsibilities meet them as compared to 57% of mothers. So actually, the percentage of "deadbeat moms" is higher than "deadbeat dads". However, fewer mothers are non-custodial parents, not that this fact affects percentages of parents with obligations who meet them.


There are a couple of reasons why someone might still be paying child support in Pennsylvania after the child reaches his/her majority. The judge could have ordered the noncustodial parent to continue child support until the child reaches the age of 22 or is no longer enrolled in and attending higher educational classes. The noncustodial parent may not have paid the full amount of child support each month or may not have paid child support at all for some time before the child reached his/her majority. In that case, the noncustodial parent must continue paying child support until the arrears plus interest have been fully paid.


There are special rules for children of divorced or separated parents, as well as children of parents who never married. In most cases the custodial parent (the parent having custody of the child for the greater part of the year) may claim the dependency exemption for the qualifying child. For this purpose, "custody" means that the child lives in the parent's main home.Custodial parent and noncustodial parent The custodial parent is the parent with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the year. The other parent is the noncustodial parent.If the parents divorced or separated during the year and the child lived with both parents before the separation, the custodial parent is the one with whom the child lived for the greater number of nights during the rest of the year.A child is treated as living with a parent for a night if the child sleeps:*.At that parent's home, whether or not the parent is present, or*.In the company of the parent, when the child does not sleep at a parent's home (for example, the parent and child are on vacation together)Equal number of nights If the child lived with each parent for an equal number of nights during the year, the custodial parent is the parent with the higher adjusted gross income.December 31. The night of December 31 is treated as part of the year in which it begins. For example, December 31, 2009, is treated as part of 2009.For more information go to the IRS gov web site and use the search box for Publication 17 go to chapter 3


In most states when the non custodial parent is not working the child support is figured as if they were working. Sometimes it is figured at minimum wage and a 40 hour work week. Sometimes higher if the non custodial parent was making substantially more than minimum wage before.


No. Child support is paid by non custodial parent, not step parent. Income of a New Spouse: Contrary to common belief, Illinois law permits judges to consider the income of a second spouse when establishing or modifying child support awards. The door swings both ways, too. A custodial parent who remarries a well-to-do spouse may suffer a reduction in child support to be paid by the non-custodial parent.19 Likewise, a non-custodial parent who remarries a spouse of substantial means may be required by the court to pay a higher child support than if the marriage had not taken place. http://www.illinoisdivorce.com/family_law_articles/etsblishing_child_support.php


It's a possible, in some instances the stipulation for payment for higher education is specified in an original support agreement. Also, the custodial parent can petition the court to modify the support order pertaining to that issue. Concerning any order modification, the judge will take into account the income of both parents, the possibility of grants, student loans, the student's employment possibilities and so forth, when rendering a decision.


Joint Custody and Child SupportJoint legal custody has no effect on child support. With joint physical custody there is still a payment of child support from the higher income parent to the lower income parent, usually determined by a sliding scale based on time with each parent (procedures vary among states). Because both parents provide for the child directly, the payment between parents may be less, but the financial support to the child is the same or higher than with sole custody.


Most women do not make as much money as men so if both your parents are working their earnings add up much higher than yours (single earner.) If you are talking about emotional support a young woman would always be more loyal to her own parents than to her in-laws.


No. Child support is mainly based on combined employment income of the 2 biological/adoptive parents. If either income changes higher or lower you can ask for an adjustment of child support.


The parent who is considered the custodial parent.


The one with the high income alhough this more often applies to fathers since they usually have the higher income.


The original child support order should contain the specified time the child support should cease. In most cases it will be the state emancipation age. However, several states have laws which can allow child support to continue while the child is pursuing higher education or until 21 years of age. Intervention by the court to cease support payments is not needed unless there are mitigating circumstances not included in the original agreement. Such as the child getting married, moving from the custodial parents home, joining the military etc. Most of these actions are mandated under state laws but may need to be brought to the attention of the court.


In Wisconsin, it depends on who has physical placement of the child. It may also depend on who has the higher income of the both parents. It is possible that even with joint custody you will still have to pay child support to the other parent. Joint custody simply means both parents have equal rights in making decisions for the well-being of the minor child/children. The person with whom the child resides the majority of the time is the person who generally receives support to be used for the child's needs. If the time is equally divided the court will decide if and how any child support will be allocated, based upon income levels of the parents and the needs of the child.


IBS = Inborn Skills These are skills your foal is born with. IBS is impacted by blup of the parents and GP of the parents. The higher the GP and blup, the higher the IBS.


Neither state currently has that provision, as California does, this does not preclude a legislative change in the future to address the number of motions to modify support for fathers being laid off. Massachusetts addressed it by doubling their rates two years ago. An argument for this can be presented to the court under a rebuttable presumption, but that can be a two way street, resulting in a lower and not higher payment. see links



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