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Answered 2005-12-09 05:09:03

It will definetely be covered if the person had a drivers license and insurance on their own vehicle...but it should be covered as long as their vehicle was sitting when your vehicle was wrecked...but also since you were in the vehicle at the time of the accident it should be covered as long as they had a license

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It depends, if the policy is a named driver policy and you are not listed as a driver then no you are not covered.


Yes. If the passenger is hurt in an accident caused by the driver, the passenger is fully entitled to sue the driver. In fact even if the passenger is a spouse of the driver, the passenger can sue.


As long as you are listed as a driver on the policy and an accident occurs in a covered vehicle, then yes you will be covered under the terms and conditions of the policy just as any other driver on the policy.


The passenger must first look to his or her own PIP (or no-fault) coverage for medical/wage loss/replacement services coverage. If the passenger does not have insurance then he or she looks to his or her household: does the passenger live with someone with auto insurance? If yes, then the passenger is covered by the resident relative's PIP. The driver's insured status does not dictate the passenger's status. However, if the driver is "an excluded" - I take it you mean he or she was not named on the policy as a driver - the passenger may have difficulty bringing a liability claim. Did the driver have the owner's permission to use the vehicle? If so, then he or she would be covered as a permissive user. However, if the driver was a young driver resident of a household - a kid using mom and dad's car - and the parents did not tell the insurance company there was a chance the kid would use the car - then you may run into coverage problems. Sometimes people try to save money by not listing a young driver on the policy. The insurance company can deny coverage in that instance.


for the driver - there will no coverage. For the passenger the same as well. It is your responsibility as a passenger, to be sure that the vehicle you are driving in is INSURED, always.


For insuring purposes it just depends on whether there was an active policy covering the driver (licensed or not) at the time of the accident. So long as there is active coverage and the driver is not excluded and meets the definition of a covered driver under the terms of the insuring contract, the accident would still be covered.AnswerA licensed driver would take complete responsibility in it while an unlicensed dude would be directly put in jail for illegal driving after paying 4 damages


If you are driving a car in the state of Illinois, then you need to carry insurance on the vehicle. Uninsured motorists can get insurance at affordable rates if they know where to look. There is a minimum amount of coverage that the driver needs to have on their insurance. This amount is not high so that drivers can get insurance coverage at an affordable rate. However, if a driver wants to take a risk and let someone else drive their car, they need to carry uninsured motorist insurance on their policy. The minimum amount for this coverage is $20,000. This covers the driver of the car if they were in an accident and were not covered under an insurance policy. In the event of a car accident and the driver of your car or the other car were not covered under their own insurance policy, the uninsured motorist coverage would protect not only yourself but the other drivers in the accident. The coverage will pay for any medical necessities that are incurred during the accident and any wages that are lost. The coverage will only pay up to the amount that you have on your insurance policy. Anything over this amount will be the responsibility of the driver. If the accident was the fault of the other driver, then their insurance will cover up to the amount listed on their policy and then your insurance will cover the remaining amount. An uninsured policy is different than an underinsured policy. An underinsured driver has insurance, but they may not have enough coverage to pay for the expenses if the driver were in an accident. An uninsured motorist has no insurance at all. The only way that an uninsured motorist can usually drive a vehicle is if there is a family member who has taken out the uninsured motorist coverage on their insurance. An uninsured policy is not expensive to get, but it would be best for the driver to obtain their own policy as soon as possible.


There is no way to tell other then verifying his coverage after an accident.


InsuranceSo long as That driver was not excluded from coverage, then Yes, that driver would be covered under a standard Texas Auto Policy.


If they are added to your policy as a scheduled driver yes they will be considered a covered driver.


It all depends on the policy. If the unlicensed driver is a named insured and the policy is active then they will be covered. If the unlicensed driver is excluded from coverage then naturally there is no coverage for them. If the unlicensed driver is not a named insured and also not excluded, Then technically they still are not a covered driver, although, coverege may still apply under the owners auto policy depending on the circumstances of any accident and the owners liability under permissive use rules if the vehicle owner allowed an unlicensed driver to operate the vehicle.


If you mean are your medical bills covered -- and assuming your state requires medical coverage on auto insurance policies -- then, no, you wouldn't be covered by any policy of the driver's since, of course, no policy exists. However, if you have your own auto policy, that policy would then become primary. After that, your health insurance would be primary. Unfortunately for the uninsured driver, if you do have to go through your own health insurance, there's a big possibility that they will go after the driver for any payments they make, particularly if a driver is legally required to carry auto insurance in your state (again, insurance that included medical coverage).



If a motorist is injured by an uninsured motorist and the driver has uninsured motorist coverage the insurance carrier will provide coverage, if certain information is obtained on the uninsured driver. If a driver has Medical payment coverage or PIP coverage he or she and any passengers will be covered by the drivers auto policy Medical payment coverage.


You will need to get a coverage that you can afford but at the same time will pay for the accident, because according to Texas state law, the driver responsible for the accident will have to pay for the accident. Insurance is a must have and you should compare the rates from multiple companies and get the one with better coverage.


== == If no other vehicles were involved in this accident, the insurance company of the motorcycle driver has to cover the medical bills of the passenger who was injured.


Not necessarily. Full coverage does not describe who is covered, but what is covered. In fact, full coverage is not an industry standard term. Most people that use that term, mean that they are carrying comprehensive and collision coverage. Those are the coverages that repair your vehicle after an accident. Every insurer is different in terms of who must be listed on your policy to be covered. Please check with you agent to be certain how your policy works. Source: Insurance Agent 8 years.


fasten his or her seatbelt, make sure they are covered by third party insurance in case of a accident and most importantly make sure driver is licensed and sober :)



Although it depends on your insurance, the driver is covered if driving with your permission.


Being named as an excluded driver means that you are not covered as the driver, and are not allowed to drive that vehicle. It doesn't mean that you can't be a passenger in the vehicle. If you were a passenger and were injured your injuries should still be covered under the insurance (whether or not the driver was your employer). If you were working at the time you may be eligible for workers compensation, also, but at the least your injuries should be covered.


if you have collision coverage file under that then your company will subrogate the uninsured driver...if no collision coverage you can file a state report, and/or small claims action.....


If your friend was at fault- then your insurance policy will pay first. Always remember the insurance follows the vehicle, NOT the driver. If the costs of the accident exceed your policy limits, your friend's policy will respond next.


If you are a licensed driver but not listed on the policy the vehicle will not be covered. If you are not licensed it will be covered.


Rental car coverage is an add-on, check your policy to see if you are covered - if there was another vehicle involved in the accident and the driver was at fault, his or her insurance should pick up the tab.